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John Good

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BUSINESS
February 9, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Good's timing was pretty bad. In May, 1989, the 27-year-old publisher founded a magazine to showcase the Orange County advertising industry. OC AdNews was a glossy, sophisticated publication aimed at promoting the county's creative talent to the many corporations headquartered locally. But Good hadn't planned on the recession, which has driven about 200 of the county's 420 ad agencies out of business and has put 4,000 people out of advertising-related jobs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In John Hammond's hands, a mess of blues is certainly good news. Though the songs he voices are nearly all unremittingly sad, there is such a richness of detail and depth of feeling expressed in his voice and playing that it makes woe seem worthwhile. And it pretty much took artistry of that magnitude to eclipse the good news that preceded his two shows Saturday night at the San Juan Capistrano Regional Library.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1988 | Howard Rosenberg
What a five-star farce! "Dear John" begins--and almost immediately the funny one-liners hit the fan. Premiering at 9 tonight on Channels 4, 36 and 39, it starts good, then gets very good before getting better. The somber protagonist of NBC's new comedy is teacher John Lacey (Judd Hirsch), who seeks solace in the One-to-One therapy club after his wife leaves him for his best friend. Instead of answers, though, he finds absurdity. The executive producers here are Peter Noah, Ed.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Good's timing was pretty bad. In May, 1989, the 27-year-old publisher founded a magazine to showcase the Orange County advertising industry. OC AdNews was a glossy, sophisticated publication aimed at promoting the county's creative talent to the many corporations headquartered locally. But Good hadn't planned on the recession, which has driven about 200 of the county's 420 ad agencies out of business and has put 4,000 people out of advertising-related jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In John Hammond's hands, a mess of blues is certainly good news. Though the songs he voices are nearly all unremittingly sad, there is such a richness of detail and depth of feeling expressed in his voice and playing that it makes woe seem worthwhile. And it pretty much took artistry of that magnitude to eclipse the good news that preceded his two shows Saturday night at the San Juan Capistrano Regional Library.
SPORTS
February 4, 1988 | JOHN WEYLER
Long before Paul Hogan had thrown his first shrimp on the barbie on national television, Mark Kerry was one of Australia's premier ambassadors of good will. He has been charming folks with a "G-day, mate" and an infectious grin since he was a 17-year-old backstroker on Australia's 1976 Olympic team in Montreal.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1992 | Anne Michaud, Times staff writer
Holt Interview: California AdNews in Newport Beach has scored a coup among communications publications: The cover story for its January/February issue is an interview with Dennis Holt, president and chief executive of Western International Media, the $1.2-billion-a-year media-buying company based in Los Angeles. Holt is also communications chairman for Rebuild L.A. The interview tells of Holt's early years growing up poor in South-Central L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
It's Paul McCartney to the rescue--of his former bandmate John Lennon's good name, which McCartney feels has been unjustly besmirched by Albert Goldman's new biography of the late ex-Beatle, which paints Lennon as an anorexic, LSD-popping waste case. "I urge people to boycott this book, which in my opinion is nothing more than a piece of trash," McCartney said in a statement released Thursday.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John St. John, the legendary Los Angeles homicide detective whose exploits over more than four decades in investigations such as the Black Dahlia and Freeway Killer murder cases led to the "Jigsaw John" television series, died Wednesday. St. John, 77, whose seniority before his retirement two years ago earned him the Los Angeles Police Department's detective badge No. 1, died of pneumonia and pancreatic cancer at a hospital in West Covina, the department said.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1993 | Anne Michaud / Times Staff Writer
Big Crowd: The Orange County Advertising Industry Exposition that was held last week drew more than 2,100 people--though its organizers had anticipated just 1,500. Free-lancers and owners of home-based businesses made up a large number of the attendees, said John Good, publisher of Newport Beach-based California AdNews, which coordinated the event. The local ad industry has been splintered during the recession by layoffs and business failures. Good said many people came looking for ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1988 | Howard Rosenberg
What a five-star farce! "Dear John" begins--and almost immediately the funny one-liners hit the fan. Premiering at 9 tonight on Channels 4, 36 and 39, it starts good, then gets very good before getting better. The somber protagonist of NBC's new comedy is teacher John Lacey (Judd Hirsch), who seeks solace in the One-to-One therapy club after his wife leaves him for his best friend. Instead of answers, though, he finds absurdity. The executive producers here are Peter Noah, Ed.
SPORTS
February 4, 1988 | JOHN WEYLER
Long before Paul Hogan had thrown his first shrimp on the barbie on national television, Mark Kerry was one of Australia's premier ambassadors of good will. He has been charming folks with a "G-day, mate" and an infectious grin since he was a 17-year-old backstroker on Australia's 1976 Olympic team in Montreal.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Entries for the annual Orange County Ad Club awards contest increased more than 50% this year, and organizers called it a sign of returning optimism. The number of companies represented also rose, from 125 last year to 175. "The two do show a resurgence of enthusiasm," said Linda Waters, a club board member. The club also lowered the cost of entering, she said, broadened its mailing list and met with many of the creative directors at local agencies to hear their suggestions for the contest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1989
Although Al Martinez's column "Dealing With Miss Ethel" (May 30) about his trauma with "Miss Ethel" at Tarzana Hospital was amusing, I must take issue with his inference that hospital volunteers are all 70-ish, simply have time on their hands, and are "not too bright!" Volunteer workers at hospitals are of all ages and offer untold (non-medical) assistance for no pay. It isn't that they simply have time on their hands, it is simply that "they have time" to work in gift shops, manage blood banks, provide clerical assistance, work at reception or admitting desks--in other words, assist in any of more than a dozen and a half areas.
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