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John Gosden

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November 6, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
The topic of the day, every day, in United States horse racing, is how to fix it. A good start toward a solution stands about 6 feet 6, hails from England, trains horses there and is at Santa Anita this week, intending to gather up large numbers of dollars to take home and convert to pounds. Which he did at last year's Breeders' Cup. If personality drives the bus, you want John Gosden's hands on the steering wheel. Gosden is Cary Grant in Ernie Els' body. He is the Big Easy with a sly smile, a wry wit and a charismatic charm.
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SPORTS
November 6, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
The topic of the day, every day, in United States horse racing, is how to fix it. A good start toward a solution stands about 6 feet 6, hails from England, trains horses there and is at Santa Anita this week, intending to gather up large numbers of dollars to take home and convert to pounds. Which he did at last year's Breeders' Cup. If personality drives the bus, you want John Gosden's hands on the steering wheel. Gosden is Cary Grant in Ernie Els' body. He is the Big Easy with a sly smile, a wry wit and a charismatic charm.
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SPORTS
July 30, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
In the early morning, as a set of horses is about to leave his barn, trainer John Gosden checks them individually and gives each exercise rider specific instructions. "He'll try to go faster, but a minute and change (for five furlongs) will do," Gosden says to one rider. After giving similar orders to a few other exercise riders that file past, Gosden stops a horse, making an adjustment in the girth. A couple of horses later, Gosden says to a rider: "We want a strong finish out of this one.
SPORTS
October 26, 2008 | BILL DWYRE
Saturday's Breeders' Cup Classic ended with Bo Derek watching at the finish line and Curlin showing that he is no longer a perfect 10 either. In a horse race as anticipated as any in years, Curlin did not win the $5-million Classic, did not live up to the superlatives. In a two-year, 15-race career that had made him one of the most famous and beloved thoroughbreds ever and brought more than $10 million in winnings, Curlin had never finished out of the money. But shortly before 4 p.m., on a sweltering afternoon at a Santa Anita Park dressed for a party and throwing a great one, Curlin was eased across the finish line by jockey Robby Albarado in fourth place.
SPORTS
January 2, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
John Gosden was furious, which was unusual. It was the fall of 1983 and the young trainer was at Belmont Park, trying to win the horse-of-the-year title with a gawky, sore-legged giant named Bates Motel. Gosden was not unhappy with the track.
SPORTS
November 17, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Eddie Delahoussaye, dismounting Saturday after riding Zoffany to victory in the $118,600 Citation Handicap at Hollywood Park, was asked by trainer John Gosden if the 5-year-old horse might be able to handle 1 1/2 miles in his next start. The question probably should have been: "Can Zoffany run 1 1/8 miles?"
SPORTS
April 24, 1986 | GRAHAME L. JONES, Times Staff Writer
Clever Song, ridden by Fernando Toro, won the 44th running of the Premiere Handicap in course-record time Wednesday afternoon as Hollywood Park opened its 47th spring-summer meeting before a crowd of 25,662. The 4-year-old colt by Clever Trick out of Garden Song covered the mile and a sixteenth on a firm turf course in a blazing 1:38 4/5. It was two seconds faster than the track record and just 4/5 of a second off the world record set by Told in the Penn National at Grantville, Pa.
SPORTS
July 5, 1987 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Some days, it just doesn't pay to get out of the starting gate. Trainer Charlie Whittingham's horses have been getting out of the gate this holiday weekend at Hollywood Park, but just barely and not promptly. Friday, in the $160,500 Silver Screen Handicap, Temperate Sil, the 3-5 favorite, broke badly and finished fifth in a six-horse field.
SPORTS
June 5, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Nearly seven months after last year's Russell Handicap at Santa Anita, the result finally is official. An appeal by the owner of The Noble Player, who finished first but was disqualified by the stewards, was denied Tuesday by the California Horse Racing Board, giving the $38,800 win to Trakady, who ran second. The Noble Player, owned by Robert Sangster of England, was not eligible for the Russell, which was restricted to horses that hadn't won $25,000 in any previous race.
SPORTS
November 21, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer John Gosden is back, if only for a fortnight or two. Once an Englishman abroad, while working here during most of the 1980s, Gosden went home in 1989, and now he has returned to California for an autumn invasion of Hollywood Park, where he had saddled 39 stakes winners while using Barn 66N as a base. Congenial as ever, Gosden stood under the paddock trees before last Sunday's Hollywood Derby, quoting Oscar Wilde and entertaining passersby with his familiar self-deprecating humor.
SPORTS
August 10, 1990 | JAY HOVDEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Del Mar always meant good times to John Gosden. The English trainer with the very American attitude spent 10 summers at the seaside track before returning to Britain in 1989. He left behind scores of friends and grateful horseplayers who admired Gosden's way with European imports. In addition to his enthusiastic support of the social circuit during the Del Mar season, Gosden made his mark by winning the training title there in 1985.
SPORTS
June 5, 1989 | JAY HOVDEY, Special to The Times
For most of his career, Sabona's bark has been a lot worse than his bite. But in Sunday's $320,800 Californian Stakes at Hollywood Park, the 7-year-old veteran finally came through with his race of a lifetime. Old Bones, as he is known around trainer Neil Drysdale's barn, has a habit of announcing himself wherever he goes with an anxious, high-decibel whinny that could shatter crystal and scare the tail off an innocent filly. Drysdale indulges the old boy's foibles, explaining that "strange ponies" make him squeal, and saddling him off in a corner of the paddock.
SPORTS
January 2, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
John Gosden was furious, which was unusual. It was the fall of 1983 and the young trainer was at Belmont Park, trying to win the horse-of-the-year title with a gawky, sore-legged giant named Bates Motel. Gosden was not unhappy with the track.
SPORTS
August 18, 1987 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Pete Escalante couldn't find a seat at Del Mar Racetrack Saturday, but the 62-year-old Rancho Penasquitos resident will remember standing in Section 16 for the rest of his life. He will also remember his six winners: Earthdust (paid $17), Select A Song ($32.80), Doctor's Tribute ($4), Julie The Flapper ($19.80), Breakfast Table ($13) and Sharrood ($7.80). Those six winners, in races two through seven, gave Escalante a Del Mar record $555,609.50 Pick Six ticket.
SPORTS
July 5, 1987 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Some days, it just doesn't pay to get out of the starting gate. Trainer Charlie Whittingham's horses have been getting out of the gate this holiday weekend at Hollywood Park, but just barely and not promptly. Friday, in the $160,500 Silver Screen Handicap, Temperate Sil, the 3-5 favorite, broke badly and finished fifth in a six-horse field.
SPORTS
August 18, 1987 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Pete Escalante couldn't find a seat at Del Mar Racetrack Saturday, but the 62-year-old Rancho Penasquitos resident will remember standing in Section 16 for the rest of his life. He will also remember his six winners: Earthdust (paid $17), Select A Song ($32.80), Doctor's Tribute ($4), Julie The Flapper ($19.80), Breakfast Table ($13) and Sharrood ($7.80). Those six winners, in races two through seven, gave Escalante a Del Mar record $555,609.50 Pick Six ticket.
SPORTS
July 12, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Great things were expected of Will Dancer, mainly because the French-bred colt covered 6 1/2 furlongs in 1:15 1/5 despite trouble in his first race in the United States. That winning performance on Jan. 2 prompted Charlie Whittingham, Will Dancer's trainer, to run him two weeks later in the 1 1/8-mile San Fernando Stakes at Santa Anita. The public was so impressed by Will Dancer's American debut that he was sent off a 7-5 favorite in the San Fernando, only to finish seventh in a 10-horse field.
SPORTS
March 30, 1987 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Like in the song, the days have dwindled down to just a precious few for Zoffany, who will soon be sent to an Australian stud farm, to be remembered as one of the most successful New Jersey-breds ever to race. Of course, New Jersey has been known more for turnpikes and tomatoes than thoroughbreds, even though two of its own, the filly Regret and Cavalcade, did win the Kentucky Derby. Irrespective of birthplace, Zoffany has had a distinguished career.
SPORTS
August 29, 1986 | Bill Christine
Although collectively they have won only four races this year, the five European horses in Sunday's Budweiser-Arlington Million are being described by overseas observers as the strongest group to run in the race. Three of the invaders--Maysoon, Pennine Walk and Teleprompter--are from England. Theatrical is from Ireland and Over the Ocean is from France.
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