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John Gottman

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NEWS
September 25, 2000 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Discord is a staple of married life. Last week's column explored the research of psychologists and marriage experts John Gottman and Robert Levenson. (In a 14-year study, they found that two kinds of couples were more likely to divorce: those who fought fiercely and frequently in the first seven years of marriage and those in midlife who dodged conflict, ostensibly to keep peace during the child-rearing years, and whose relationships had, as a result, grown distant and icy.
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NEWS
September 25, 2000 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Discord is a staple of married life. Last week's column explored the research of psychologists and marriage experts John Gottman and Robert Levenson. (In a 14-year study, they found that two kinds of couples were more likely to divorce: those who fought fiercely and frequently in the first seven years of marriage and those in midlife who dodged conflict, ostensibly to keep peace during the child-rearing years, and whose relationships had, as a result, grown distant and icy.
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HEALTH
March 30, 1998 | SHARI ROAN
This book is a compilation of highly publicized research from these University of Washington scientists. The authors describe two types of batterers and explain which kind of batterer is more amenable to counseling and help. They describe how women can prepare themselves psychologically to leave an abusive relationship. Neil Jacobson and John Gottman take a hard line on batterers, saying that legal sanctions must be applied to offenders, whether or not they also choose psychotherapy.
HEALTH
March 30, 1998 | SHARI ROAN
This book is a compilation of highly publicized research from these University of Washington scientists. The authors describe two types of batterers and explain which kind of batterer is more amenable to counseling and help. They describe how women can prepare themselves psychologically to leave an abusive relationship. Neil Jacobson and John Gottman take a hard line on batterers, saying that legal sanctions must be applied to offenders, whether or not they also choose psychotherapy.
HEALTH
November 24, 1997 | HARA ESTROFF MARANO, PSYCHOLOGY TODAY
Walk into any bookstore in America, head for the psychology section, and there, shelved side by side--until sales do them part--you'll find two of the gurus of marriage and relationships, John Gottman, PhD, and John Gray, PhD. Gottman, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, virtually invented the science of observing how people behave within relationships.
NEWS
July 2, 2001 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For three decades, relationship research psychologists have been able to pinpoint behaviors in couples that lead to successful, fulfilling and enduring relationships and conversely, behaviors that are corrosive, insidious and deleterious to the bonds of love. Over the last dozen years, such relationship data have spurred an explosion of therapeutic approaches, relationship education courses and 911-emergency-like interventions for the divorce-bound.
NEWS
March 13, 2000 | HARA ESTROFF MARANO
Great relationships, whether friendships or romances, don't fall out of the heavens. They depend on sophisticated but human-scale social skills that everyone can learn. * Practice makes perfect, even for the socially secure. Stop turning down party invitations and start issuing invitations. Plan outings with friends or acquaintances. * Think positively. * Focus on others. The socially competent observe others and listen actively. "You don't have to be interesting.
NEWS
September 18, 2000 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one gets married thinking they're destined for Splitsville. But the chance of a first marriage ending in divorce over a 40-year-period is 67%, according to research. With such dire statistics casting a pall over the state of marriage, research psychologists have made it their mission to understand what happens when good marriages go bad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1998 | CAROL JAGO, Carol Jago teaches at Santa Monica High School and directs the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. E-mail: jago@gseis.ucla.edu
I knew something was missing from Superintendent Ruben Zacarias' seven-point plan for improving Los Angeles public schools, but I couldn't quite put my finger on what. Then I read psychologist John Gottman's study on successful marriages and the last puzzle piece fell into place. Researchers at the University of Washington found that in order for a marriage to last, husbands should simply do what their wives say.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the questions forever nagging humankind: What makes a good marriage good? In seeking the elusive answer, researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle have consulted the experts: couples in fabulously high-functioning, happy marriages.
HEALTH
November 24, 1997 | HARA ESTROFF MARANO, PSYCHOLOGY TODAY
Walk into any bookstore in America, head for the psychology section, and there, shelved side by side--until sales do them part--you'll find two of the gurus of marriage and relationships, John Gottman, PhD, and John Gray, PhD. Gottman, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, virtually invented the science of observing how people behave within relationships.
NEWS
February 21, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Husbands, forget all that psychobabble about "active listening" and "validation." If you want your marriage to last a long time, the newest advice from psychologists is quite simple: Be willing to do what your wife says. A widely recommended form of marital relationship advice has been active listening, in which one partner paraphrases the other partner's concerns--"So what I hear you saying is . . ."
MAGAZINE
June 24, 2001 | MATTHEW HELLER, Matthew Heller last wrote for the magazine about the death of Herbalife founder Mark Hughes
If you'd joined Laura Doyle and her husband, John, for dinner a few years ago, the atmosphere might have been a little tense. "I might have felt anxious about what John was going to say," explains Laura. "I might have wanted to jump in and correct him." Back then, Laura had a superiority complex, a "femino-centric" view that "everything female is the right way and everything male is the wrong way."
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