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NEWS
April 14, 1990
Dr. John Graham, 81, a pioneer in headache treatment and founder of the Headache Research Foundation at Boston's Faulkner Hospital. Chief of medical service at the Faulkner Hospital for 25 years, he introduced corticosteroids and developed the ergotamine-caffeine suppository to treat migraine headaches. He also identified side effects of the headache medicine Sansert and directed studies on beta-blockers and lithium. In Boston on Wednesday of a blood disorder.
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NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Sometimes, it's better to give if you want to receive. HumbleBundle, a San Francisco start-up that's sold millions of dollars of computer games over the last two years, is now entering the music scene. What's unusual about HumbleBundle is that it lets buyers name their price -- any price at all as long as it's at least a penny. That's right: one cent. The current sale involves six downloadable albums from They Might Be Giants, Jonathan Coulton, Christopher Tin, Hitoshi Sakimoto and MC Frontalot, with bonus tracks from OK Go. At that price, one would expect HumbleBundle to be bleeding cash.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
OK, here is the script--it's 1920, a White Russian aristocrat fleeing the Bolsheviks escapes to New York with his beautiful wife and new baby. He is a dashing former lieutenant in the Czar's cavalry and a man of great learning, speaking a dozen languages. In his homeland he served as a lawyer and judge. Despite these accomplishments, he is initially unable to find work in New York and is reduced to teaching horsemanship while his wife serves as a governess.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2010 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Police were initially baffled when someone killed a popular and friendly homeless man by dousing him with gasoline and setting him on fire in the Koreatown area of Los Angeles. But homicide detectives soon zeroed in on Ben Matthew Martin, a man obsessed with cleanliness who also had a history of run-ins with the homeless. Martin, they discovered, had worked at a barbershop near the crime scene and was known for yelling at street people who lingered in the area. In the summer of 2008, he was fired when his boss learned he had struck a homeless man with a bag of towels and kicked him in the back.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Sometimes, it's better to give if you want to receive. HumbleBundle, a San Francisco start-up that's sold millions of dollars of computer games over the last two years, is now entering the music scene. What's unusual about HumbleBundle is that it lets buyers name their price -- any price at all as long as it's at least a penny. That's right: one cent. The current sale involves six downloadable albums from They Might Be Giants, Jonathan Coulton, Christopher Tin, Hitoshi Sakimoto and MC Frontalot, with bonus tracks from OK Go. At that price, one would expect HumbleBundle to be bleeding cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | LISA HEINZERLING, Lisa Heinzerling is a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center
The Senate may vote as early as today on President Bush's nomination of John D. Graham as the country's regulatory czar. The power implied by the title is real: As head of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs within the Office of Management and Budget, Graham would be responsible for reviewing all major regulations proposed by agencies charged with protecting health, safety and the environment. Graham's record reveals a deep hostility to these protections.
BOOKS
October 4, 1992 | Judith Martin, Martin, who writes the Miss Manners syndicated column and books, is still having difficulty making the transition from ocean liner to airplane, especially when she tries to force her steamer trunk into the overhead bin
On the maiden voyage of the Queen Elizabeth 2 in 1969, Sir Basil Smallpiece, chairman of the Cunard Line, and his deputy, Lord Mancroft, summoned the American journalists aboard to a sailing-night cocktail party to explain the concept of manners. Not being used to good service ourselves, we were told, we would probably not be able to appreciate the very highest British standard that we would enjoy aboard the ship, but we should nevertheless be aware that it was there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2010 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Police were initially baffled when someone killed a popular and friendly homeless man by dousing him with gasoline and setting him on fire in the Koreatown area of Los Angeles. But homicide detectives soon zeroed in on Ben Matthew Martin, a man obsessed with cleanliness who also had a history of run-ins with the homeless. Martin, they discovered, had worked at a barbershop near the crime scene and was known for yelling at street people who lingered in the area. In the summer of 2008, he was fired when his boss learned he had struck a homeless man with a bag of towels and kicked him in the back.
TRAVEL
April 10, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Talk about a travel deal. How does $3 a night sound, meals included? Or less than $1 for a train trip between cities? Or a transatlantic cruise for less than 9 British pounds? If that's your idea of a bargain, hop in a time machine to circa 1860, just before the outbreak of the Civil War. And bring along your 2011-vintage paycheck. Yes, prices were low for antebellum tourists, but so were wages; a middle class U.S. family might live on $1,000 to $3,000 a year. Travel in those days also entailed dangers and discomforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | LISA HEINZERLING, Lisa Heinzerling is a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center
The Senate may vote as early as today on President Bush's nomination of John D. Graham as the country's regulatory czar. The power implied by the title is real: As head of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs within the Office of Management and Budget, Graham would be responsible for reviewing all major regulations proposed by agencies charged with protecting health, safety and the environment. Graham's record reveals a deep hostility to these protections.
BOOKS
October 4, 1992 | Judith Martin, Martin, who writes the Miss Manners syndicated column and books, is still having difficulty making the transition from ocean liner to airplane, especially when she tries to force her steamer trunk into the overhead bin
On the maiden voyage of the Queen Elizabeth 2 in 1969, Sir Basil Smallpiece, chairman of the Cunard Line, and his deputy, Lord Mancroft, summoned the American journalists aboard to a sailing-night cocktail party to explain the concept of manners. Not being used to good service ourselves, we were told, we would probably not be able to appreciate the very highest British standard that we would enjoy aboard the ship, but we should nevertheless be aware that it was there.
NEWS
April 14, 1990
Dr. John Graham, 81, a pioneer in headache treatment and founder of the Headache Research Foundation at Boston's Faulkner Hospital. Chief of medical service at the Faulkner Hospital for 25 years, he introduced corticosteroids and developed the ergotamine-caffeine suppository to treat migraine headaches. He also identified side effects of the headache medicine Sansert and directed studies on beta-blockers and lithium. In Boston on Wednesday of a blood disorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
OK, here is the script--it's 1920, a White Russian aristocrat fleeing the Bolsheviks escapes to New York with his beautiful wife and new baby. He is a dashing former lieutenant in the Czar's cavalry and a man of great learning, speaking a dozen languages. In his homeland he served as a lawyer and judge. Despite these accomplishments, he is initially unable to find work in New York and is reduced to teaching horsemanship while his wife serves as a governess.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2009 | Tom Hamburger and Christi Parsons
Harvard Law School professor Cass R. Sunstein, a widely admired intellectual and friend of President Obama, has spent years delving into the obscure issues of regulatory law and behavioral economics. Though he is generally described as left of center, Sunstein's academic interests in regulation have led him to raise questions about the constitutionality of liberal favorites such as workplace safety laws and the Clean Air Act.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | Associated Press
While passenger-side air bags have killed at least 38 children, a majority of Americans believe that the safety devices help more children than they hurt, according to a new survey. Nearly 60% of adults polled by the Center for Risk Analysis at the Harvard School of Public Health mistakenly believe that air bags are saving more children's lives than not, the researchers maintain.
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