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May 17, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
John Green, bestselling and prize-winning author of young adult novels including "The Fault In Our Stars" and "Looking for Alaska," gave the commencement address at Butler University on May 11. It's witty, smart, thoughtful, and going viral; if you start hearing people in your life saying "happy birthday, sir," you can thank him. There's a YouTube video of the entire graudation ceremony -- Green begins speaking about an hour in -- and he's...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
Having already gone through the social media wringer when he was cast in the young-adult franchise "Divergent," Ansel Elgort thought he had a pretty good idea about how passionate and protective readers can be about their favorite books. Then he won the role of Augustus Waters, the love interest in the movie adaptation of John Green's bestselling romance "The Fault in Our Stars," and the 20-year-old actor realized he had crossed into an uncharted realm. For the first few hours after the news broke last May, Elgort's Twitter following mushroomed, and many of the newcomers weren't shy about sharing their opinion about his casting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013
Following his State of the Union address, President Obama did a Google+ hangout with five engaged citizens -- including writer John Green. Green is the bestselling author of the young adult books "The Fault in Our Stars," "Will Grayson Will Grayson," "Paper Towns," "An Abundance of Katherines" and "Looking for Alaska. " He's also a popular video blogger, with his brother Hank. Their vlogbrothers channel has also launched a record company, a stage show that went to Carnegie Hall, and a lot of awesome.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By James Barragan
During the Q&A session of a Saturday panel at the L.A. Times Festival of Books, "The Fault In Our Stars," author John Green revealed two favorite lines that he's written. Both are from his first book, "Looking for Alaska. " The first is from the character Miles "Pudge" Halter feeling inadequate in the face of the girl he admires, Alaska Young: "If people were rain, I was drizzle and she was a hurricane. " The author revealed two additional secrets about that line. He almost cut it out of the final version of the text, thinking it was too cheesy, and the original version compared people to 'precipitation" instead of "rain.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By James Barragan
During the Q&A session of a Saturday panel at the L.A. Times Festival of Books, "The Fault In Our Stars," author John Green revealed two favorite lines that he's written. Both are from his first book, "Looking for Alaska. " The first is from the character Miles "Pudge" Halter feeling inadequate in the face of the girl he admires, Alaska Young: "If people were rain, I was drizzle and she was a hurricane. " The author revealed two additional secrets about that line. He almost cut it out of the final version of the text, thinking it was too cheesy, and the original version compared people to 'precipitation" instead of "rain.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
You could say that John Green fans are excited about hearing the author of "The Fault in Our Stars" talk. Two hours before his Saturday panel was set to begin at the L.A. Times Festival of Books, more than 20 fans had already lined up in front of the door to Bovard Auditorium for the sold-out session set to begin at 12:30 p.m. Event volunteers said fans were waiting even before attendees for an earlier panel about Cesar Chavez at the same...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By James Barragan
The atmosphere at John Green's panel was sort of like a high school classroom. And Green was the coolest kid on campus. The skinny, nerdy-looking author with glasses was treated like a rock star during his panel at the L.A. Times Festival of Books on Saturday, with the crowd - some of whom had waited in line since 9 a.m. for a 12:30 p.m. session - giving him a roaring ovation when he walked onstage. He delighted his audience, which ranged from teenagers to gray-haired baby boomers, in speaking about the autobiographical nature of some of his books, his love of romance novels, his beef with the Internet, and a concept he created in which people who identify as “nerdfighters” team up to spread positivity throughout the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Gwenda Bond
John Green's career as a book world phenom began auspiciously: His funny but tragic 2005 debut novel, "Looking for Alaska," became a cult young adult hit and landed the American Library Assn.'s Printz Award for YA novel of the year. This was followed by 2006's "An Abundance of Katherines," a heavily footnoted romantic comedy shortlisted for the Printz and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and 2008's "Paper Towns," which nabbed an Edgar Award. But it was 2012's "The Fault in Our Stars," featuring a heart-wrenching romance between intellectual teen cancer patients that cemented Green's status as a YA superstar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Nicole Sperling
PITTSBURGH - Most movie sets orbit around one key individual. Usually, it's the director or the star. Occasionally, it's a heavyweight producer. Seldom is it the writer of the movie's source material. But John Green is not just any writer. On a crisp day in early October as cameras rolled on Fox 2000's film adaptation of his 2012 novel "The Fault in Our Stars," a bestselling love story about two wry, cancer-stricken teenagers, the 36-year-old author was exerting a strong gravitational pull.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
While watching one of his recent YouTube videos, it's immediately clear that John Green isn't just an author. He's a multimedia darling playing to 1,000-seat auditoriums of screaming fans. Some of the crowds showing up for his mostly sold-out, 17-city tour in support of his latest young-adult novel are subscribers to the Vlogbrothers, the video blog Green runs with his brother that draws seven million viewers per month. Others rank among his 1.17 million Twitter followers. Many have read his new bittersweet tragi-comedy, "The Fault in Our Stars," about two teenagers fighting cancer and falling in love.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By James Barragan
The atmosphere at John Green's panel was sort of like a high school classroom. And Green was the coolest kid on campus. The skinny, nerdy-looking author with glasses was treated like a rock star during his panel at the L.A. Times Festival of Books on Saturday, with the crowd - some of whom had waited in line since 9 a.m. for a 12:30 p.m. session - giving him a roaring ovation when he walked onstage. He delighted his audience, which ranged from teenagers to gray-haired baby boomers, in speaking about the autobiographical nature of some of his books, his love of romance novels, his beef with the Internet, and a concept he created in which people who identify as “nerdfighters” team up to spread positivity throughout the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
You could say that John Green fans are excited about hearing the author of "The Fault in Our Stars" talk. Two hours before his Saturday panel was set to begin at the L.A. Times Festival of Books, more than 20 fans had already lined up in front of the door to Bovard Auditorium for the sold-out session set to begin at 12:30 p.m. Event volunteers said fans were waiting even before attendees for an earlier panel about Cesar Chavez at the same...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The 34th annual Los Angeles Times Book Prizes were awarded Friday night at USC's Bovard Auditorium. The winners in 10 categories included a first-generation Chinese American, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and one of the bestselling authors of all time (sort of). Not all the winners were present to accept their awards -- the mystery/thriller prize went to “The Cuckoo's Calling” by Robert Galbraith, a once-secret pseudonym of J.K. Rowling. The mega-bestselling author of the Harry Potter series is notoriously private and did not attend.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Gwenda Bond
John Green's career as a book world phenom began auspiciously: His funny but tragic 2005 debut novel, "Looking for Alaska," became a cult young adult hit and landed the American Library Assn.'s Printz Award for YA novel of the year. This was followed by 2006's "An Abundance of Katherines," a heavily footnoted romantic comedy shortlisted for the Printz and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and 2008's "Paper Towns," which nabbed an Edgar Award. But it was 2012's "The Fault in Our Stars," featuring a heart-wrenching romance between intellectual teen cancer patients that cemented Green's status as a YA superstar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The finalists for the 34th annual L.A. Times Book Prizes were announced Wednesday morning: 50 books in 10 categories are in the running to win the L.A. Times Book Prizes, to be awarded in April. Two authors will receive special recognition: John Green with the Innovators Award and Susan Straight with the Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement. Bestselling young adult novelist John Green will be presented with the Innovators Award for his dynamic use of online media to entertain and engage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Nicole Sperling
PITTSBURGH - Most movie sets orbit around one key individual. Usually, it's the director or the star. Occasionally, it's a heavyweight producer. Seldom is it the writer of the movie's source material. But John Green is not just any writer. On a crisp day in early October as cameras rolled on Fox 2000's film adaptation of his 2012 novel "The Fault in Our Stars," a bestselling love story about two wry, cancer-stricken teenagers, the 36-year-old author was exerting a strong gravitational pull.
SPORTS
October 17, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Thompson, former University of Oklahoma quarterback serving a two-year sentence for selling cocaine, testified this week in Oklahoma federal court that he, Jamelle Holieway and other members of the Sooner football team used cocaine. Thompson also said then-coach Barry Switzer suspected the Sooner players were taking the drug. Thompson was testifying in the trial of John Green and Lamont Harris, former Oklahoma athletes accused of supplying Thompson with cocaine in January of 1989.
SPORTS
October 16, 1990 | Associated Press
Former Oklahoma quarterback Charles Thompson testified Monday that he sold cocaine to an undercover FBI agent for a one-time teammate and a former member of the school's track team. Thompson, serving a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to a federal charge of conspiracy to distribute cocaine in April of 1989, testified during the trial of John Green, 25, a former teammate from Detroit, and Lamont Harris, 23, a Dallas resident who lettered in track from 1986 to 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Morning News' annual Tournament of Books has started its engines. On Tuesday, the ToB announced its lineup of contenders to be named the winner -- actually, the Rooster -- for 2014. Initially conceived as "a goof" that took the college basketball tournament model and filled brackets with books, the ToB has proved both long-lasting and inspirational. While it has been followed by dozens of book-bracket imitators that set up all kinds of reading competitions -- children's books, books about Los Angeles -- the race for the Rooster remains central.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Louis Bayard
When it came out in 2003, David Levithan's young-adult debut, "Boy Meets Boy," had the pinkish glow of wish fulfillment. Its gay-teen hero found love in a small-town utopia where parents embraced children's differences, jocks treated queers as peers, and a cross-dressing high school quarterback could double as head cheerleader. So much peace, love and understanding - at a time when homosexuality was illegal in 14 states, when "Don't ask, don't tell" and the Defense of Marriage Act were the laws of the land, and the murder of Matthew Shepard was fresh in memory.
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