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John Greenlee

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NEWS
September 9, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
Since the last big California drought from 1988 to 1993, lots of people have wondered if it was possible to replace that monotonous, consumptive contrivance called a lawn. After all, that bright green lawn is a carry-over from wetter English and East Coast gardens. To keep them going in California's climate requires water, fertilizer, and a weekly mow and blow by noisy, polluting machines.
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NEWS
September 9, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS
* California meadow sedge, Carex pansa: dark green, tolerates half-day of shade. * Texas meadow sedge, Carex perdentata: yellow-green, will tolerate shade and needs a half-day in desert. * Cajun sedge, Carex retroflexa texensis: medium green, tolerates shade, more yellow-green in full sun. * Baltimore sedge, Carex senta: virtually identical to C retroflexa above but slightly neater. * Pennsylvania sedge, Carex pennsylvanica pacificum: dark green, best in sandy, well-drained soils.
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NEWS
September 8, 1999
Horticulturist John Greenlee specializes in using special meadow grasses to replace conventional, high-maintenance lawns.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
Since the last big California drought from 1988 to 1993, lots of people have wondered if it was possible to replace that monotonous, consumptive contrivance called a lawn. After all, that bright green lawn is a carry-over from wetter English and East Coast gardens. To keep them going in California's climate requires water, fertilizer, and a weekly mow and blow by noisy, polluting machines.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS
* California meadow sedge, Carex pansa: dark green, tolerates half-day of shade. * Texas meadow sedge, Carex perdentata: yellow-green, will tolerate shade and needs a half-day in desert. * Cajun sedge, Carex retroflexa texensis: medium green, tolerates shade, more yellow-green in full sun. * Baltimore sedge, Carex senta: virtually identical to C retroflexa above but slightly neater. * Pennsylvania sedge, Carex pennsylvanica pacificum: dark green, best in sandy, well-drained soils.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John A. Greenlee, an outspoken educator who presided over Cal State L.A. during a period of enormous growth, has died in a Pasadena hospital. W. E. Lloyd, a former publications editor for the sprawling campus perched above the San Bernardino Freeway east of downtown Los Angeles, said Greenlee was 81 when he died Monday of a heart attack. Greenlee came to Cal State in 1965 as acting president and assumed the presidency six months later.
MAGAZINE
January 31, 1999 | Susan Heeger
Look here, there's more meadow madness coming," says John Greenlee, tramping through his dewy garden in the post-dawn fog. He lifts a rose and takes a whiff. "A perfect moment. Just a moment. That's what you get here. Performance art." It's cold, not quite 7 a.m. We're in the "Rose Room," a part of his half-acre Pomona landscape that illustrates what he calls "a new paradigm for the American garden."
REAL ESTATE
October 31, 1993
The annual Fall Plant Festival will be held Thursday through Sunday at the Huntington Library, Arts Collections and Botanical Gardens at 1151 Oxford Road in San Marino. A garden lecture will be given at 2:30 p.m. each day in Friends' Hall, with a plant sale from 1 to 4:30 every afternoon on the Garden Terrace. A selection of bulbs, flowers, shrubs and fall foliage plants will be offered at the sale and will include such favorites as daffodils and irises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1996
Theodore C. Riggs of Thousand Oaks, a retired safety representative for GTE, died Friday in a Thousand Oaks hospital. He was 69. Riggs was born Nov. 11, 1927, in Chicago. In 1951, at the age of 24, he went to work for GTE. Riggs stayed with the company for 27 years, retiring in 1978. After he retired, Riggs worked 18 years as a self-employed handyman. He moved to Ventura County in 1986.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS
Friday: a tour of John Greenlee's grass nursery in Pomona, leaving at 9 a.m. from Descanso Gardens, 1418 Descanso Drive, La Canada Flintridge; (818) 952-4401. $25, with reservation required. Saturday: a children's garden workshop on cocoa and chocolate, 9-11:30 a.m., at the Huntington Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino; (626) 405-2127. $12, includes admission for accompanying adult. Preregistration required. Saturday and Sunday: the Los Angeles Rose Society show; 1-4 p.m.
NEWS
September 8, 1999
Horticulturist John Greenlee specializes in using special meadow grasses to replace conventional, high-maintenance lawns.
MAGAZINE
January 31, 1999 | Susan Heeger
Look here, there's more meadow madness coming," says John Greenlee, tramping through his dewy garden in the post-dawn fog. He lifts a rose and takes a whiff. "A perfect moment. Just a moment. That's what you get here. Performance art." It's cold, not quite 7 a.m. We're in the "Rose Room," a part of his half-acre Pomona landscape that illustrates what he calls "a new paradigm for the American garden."
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John A. Greenlee, an outspoken educator who presided over Cal State L.A. during a period of enormous growth, has died in a Pasadena hospital. W. E. Lloyd, a former publications editor for the sprawling campus perched above the San Bernardino Freeway east of downtown Los Angeles, said Greenlee was 81 when he died Monday of a heart attack. Greenlee came to Cal State in 1965 as acting president and assumed the presidency six months later.
HOME & GARDEN
September 14, 1991 | SHARON COHOON
Just as certain dresses don't look like much on the hanger, grasses don't look like much in nursery pots. So it's hard to visualize how to use them until you see mature plants in the ground. The best place for that is at John Greenlee's nursery in Pomona. Though he is a wholesaler, Greenlee allows group tours by appointment. Greenlee's descriptive catalogue is also handy to have on hand when you visit regular retail nurseries.
MAGAZINE
June 27, 1993 | ROBERT SMAUS
A grass that once fed herds of bison on the vast American prairie may yet become, as Pomona nurseryman John Greenlee puts it, "the turf of the '90s." Billowy buffalo grass already grows in residential gardens that require little moisture and even less mowing. And, as seen at the Pasadena home of landscape designer Robert Cornell, its subdued blue-green hue harmonizes well with many gray and silver dry-climate plants.
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