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John Grisham

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Like Carl Hiassen, Francine Prose and Susan Straight before him, John Grisham is paying attention to the younger set. His new legal thriller, "Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer," is targeted at readers between 9 and 12, the age group otherwise known as tweens. The main character of this novel, 13-year-old Boone, is slightly older than that, but as a bicycle-riding junior high schooler, he is definitely still a kid. Certainly, he's far from law school, let alone the bar exam, so what's with that title anyway?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
John Grisham is the world's most successful author of legal thrillers (and one baseball novel, last year's "Calico Joe") with sales of more than 275 million copies to his credit. He talked by phone from his office in Charlottesville, Va., about "Sycamore Row. " His latest novel returns to Clanton, Miss., the setting of his most popular book, "A Time to Kill," later made into a film and a play that recently closed after a brief run on Broadway. What made you decide to return to small-town lawyer Jake Brigance and Clanton almost 30 years after "A Time to Kill"?
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Tribune newspapers
John Grisham is to literature what Cheerios are to a rushed breakfast, something you buy in bulk and consume without too much thought. Honestly, I'm relieved when a new Grisham book doesn't weigh more than I do. Yet his newest work, "Calico Joe," is as slender as a Dodgers shortstop. Coming in at under 200 pages, it is a breezy little baseball novel that will probably appeal to many men the way Nicholas Sparks' stories appeal to that other sex. Strangely, considering the subject matter, it is amazingly unevocative of the game itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By David Ng
John Grisham, the author of such Southern lawyer-in-peril bestsellers as "The Firm" and "The Pelican Brief," has seen seven of his legal thrillers turned into feature films. On Sunday, Grisham attended the opening of the first Broadway production based on one of his books, "A Time to Kill. " Published in 1989, "A Time to Kill" was Grisham's first novel. The story follows a young, relatively inexperienced attorney as he defends a father who killed the men who raped his daughter. The novel was made into a movie in 1996 with Matthew McConaughey, Samuel L. Jackson, Kevin Spacey and Sandra Bullock.  The stage version of "A Time to Kill" was produced at the Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., in 2011.
NEWS
August 28, 1995
Jay S. Garon, 71, New York literary agent who took on best-selling attorney-author John Grisham after 30 other agents refused. Born in Fall River, Mass., Garon attended UCLA and was a character actor in a few films, including "Dragon Seed" and "First Yank Into Tokyo." Moving to New York, he produced radio and television shows and a Broadway play, "Katake," before creating his literary agency in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2006 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
AS a novelist, John Grisham had an advantage in turning his hand to nonfiction for the first time in "The Innocent Man." He knows how to tell a story swiftly and cleanly; he knows that we want to read about people's lives, not just about the ills of the U.S. justice system. So he keeps his focus tightly on the two men, Ron Williamson and Dennis Fritz, who were convicted of raping and killing a 21-year-old cocktail waitress, Debra Sue Carter, in Ada, Okla., in 1982.
NEWS
February 6, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maybe "A Painted House" is the kind of novel John Grisham intended to write all along, before he broke through with his first legal thriller. To keep his fans and publishers happy, he felt he had to go on cranking out bestselling tales of lawyerly shenanigans, even as his interest in the genre waned. Maybe. It's worth a thought.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The big news for John Grisham fans is that his 10th novel--already a No. 1 national bestseller--doesn't confine itself to courtrooms and law offices. But much of it does concern a legal brouhaha--over the will left by Troy Phelan, an eccentric, reclusive Virginia tycoon who somewhat resembles Howard Hughes. Phelan, estranged from his three ex-wives and six children, summons them for the reading of a testament that he hints will make them all rich.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2004 | Dan Lewerenz, Associated Press
Marcia Tanner lives just a few blocks from where the Little League World Series is played, so she's familiar with bright lights and high drama. She got a different type of Little League drama on Thursday night. Three years after John Grisham filmed "Mickey" on the Little League Baseball complex in South Williamsport, Tanner finally got to see the finished product, starring Harry Connick Jr., on the big screen.
NEWS
June 3, 1996 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Grisham's timing for this novel--about elaborate and sneaky attempts to influence jurors hearing a landmark lawsuit against cigarette manufacturers--couldn't have been better. Just up the road from Biloxi, Miss., site of Grisham's fictional trial, a federal appeals court in New Orleans last month rejected a massive class-action suit on behalf of tens of millions of U.S. smokers, preserving Big Tobacco's unbeaten record in major litigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By David L. Ulin
If you believe print is on the way out, Laura Miller wants you to think again. In Salon this week , she uses Simon & Schuster's recent deal with ebook phenom Hugh Howey , author of the “Wool” series, to suggest that, contrary to the myth that self-publishing represents a leveling of the playing field, many presses are thrilled to take advantage of such low-hanging fruit. “By the time a self-published author has made a success of his or her book,” Miller observes, “all the hard stuff is done, not just writing the manuscript but editing and the all-important marketing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Oct. 21 - 27 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     This Morning John Grisham; James Dyson. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi and Jionni LaValle; Donna Karan; Halloween decor; Chris Kimball. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Rod Stewart; Dreama Walker, Krysten Ritter and James Van Der Beek. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael Ted Danson; Jack McBrayer; Little Big Town performs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2012
Calico Joe A Novel John Grisham Doubleday: 198 pp., $24.95
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Tribune newspapers
John Grisham is to literature what Cheerios are to a rushed breakfast, something you buy in bulk and consume without too much thought. Honestly, I'm relieved when a new Grisham book doesn't weigh more than I do. Yet his newest work, "Calico Joe," is as slender as a Dodgers shortstop. Coming in at under 200 pages, it is a breezy little baseball novel that will probably appeal to many men the way Nicholas Sparks' stories appeal to that other sex. Strangely, considering the subject matter, it is amazingly unevocative of the game itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Once an industry standard for new dramas, the two-hour premiere has become rare enough to acquire an alarming air; as with 10-minute film trailers or wildly enthusiastic blind-date suggestions, one quickly catches the underlying whiff of desperation. And indeed, NBC's new legal thriller "The Firm" is so front-loaded for success — John Grisham! Josh Lucas! Juliette Lewis! — that even two hours feel uncomfortably crammed, with back story and B-plot, family drama and legalese, potential conspiracies and sentimental posturing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2010 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
If only life moved along at the same clip as a John Grisham novel. Beginning writers should study him the way budding composers study Brahms or Pachelbel. He is a master at pacing, even if that doesn't always make up for some of his shortcomings. His latest, "The Confession," is again legal literature on meth. Travis Boyette is an evil, deathly ill parolee in Kansas with a secret he has to share with someone. The serial rapist picks everyman minister Keith Schroeder for his out-of-the-blue confession to the murder of a high school cheerleader in Texas a decade earlier.
BOOKS
May 14, 1995 | Garry Abrams, Garry Abrams is a free-lance writer
Nearly 3 million copies of this book, John Grisham's sixth novel, are said to be print--enough to stock every Wal-Mart and convenience store in America, not to mention a bookstore or two. Before it's all over, a few copies may even turn up at Joe's Bar & Grill down at the corner, next to the beer nuts. And all these places are exactly where Grisham's latest should be.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2010
Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer A Novel John Grisham Dutton Children's Books: 264 pp., $16.99
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