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John Guare

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | PATRICK PACHECO
Anecdotes are the meat of any dinner party, and, in the fall of 1983, New Yorkers were feasting on a juicy story about a charming young black man who managed to win the confidence of certain prominent New Yorkers by posing as the son of Sidney Poitier. On successive nights, "David Poitier" duped two couples by claiming to be a college friend of their children.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Philip Brandes
It's not every play that spawns a pop culture trope on the order of “Six Degrees of Separation.” Yet there's far more to John Guare's 1990 drama than platitudes about human connectedness, as Stella Adler Lab Theatre's revival reminds us with perceptive staging and solid lead performances. Guare breached norms and boundaries of race, class and ethics with this tightly constructed play about Paul (Charles Ohaeri), a young black homosexual who charms his way into the homes and lives of well-to-do Manhattanites by claiming to be the son of actor Sidney Poitier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2009 | CHARLES McNULTY, THEATER CRITIC
A few things have changed since John Guare's "Six Degrees of Separation" first held the mirror up to New York's social-climbing nature nearly two decades ago. The 5th Avenue setting graduated from million- to billion-dollar deals, the Japanese lost their yen for tourist treasures, and international Ponzi schemes came to replace the more personalized (and relatively small-potato) con games of yore. But as the Old Globe production of Guare's 1990 play makes clear, life is pretty much the same in the deluxe condos of the rich and rapacious.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2009 | CHARLES McNULTY, THEATER CRITIC
A few things have changed since John Guare's "Six Degrees of Separation" first held the mirror up to New York's social-climbing nature nearly two decades ago. The 5th Avenue setting graduated from million- to billion-dollar deals, the Japanese lost their yen for tourist treasures, and international Ponzi schemes came to replace the more personalized (and relatively small-potato) con games of yore. But as the Old Globe production of Guare's 1990 play makes clear, life is pretty much the same in the deluxe condos of the rich and rapacious.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1996 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If you asked 50 people in the theater to name the top 10 American playwrights, all of them would have John Guare on their lists," Gregory Mosher, the former artistic director of Lincoln Center Theatre, contends.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1993 | ROGER D. FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a front corner table of Mortimer's on Lexington Avenue, playwright John Guare (silver haired, bow-tied, eyes twinkling with mischief) and actress Stockard Channing (blond-streaked and engagingly caustic in tortoise shell sunglasses) playfully jab at one another over baked apples and crab cakes. "We've known each other for 23 years," remarks Channing wryly as a photographer shoots away. "Has it been 23?" asks Guare with mock surprise. "I guess so."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Get Outta My Face: On the same day that "Six Degrees of Separation" garnered four Tony nominations, the convicted con artist who served as its inspiration was ordered by a New York judge to stay away from the playwright. David Hampton was told not to go near playwright John Guare after complaints that he threatened Guare's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989
"Wrap" artist Christo and playwright John Guare are among 10 cultural figures have been elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, an organization chartered by Congress in 1913 as the nation's honor society of the arts. Christo, 53, whose full name is Christo Javaceff, creates art by wrapping fabric and plastic around things such as islands, buildings and bridges. He was born in Bulgaria and is a naturalized American.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
"This is not a part you can afford to get sloppy with," says William Atherton, who is playing opposite Gregory Harrison and Brian McNamara as the foreboding Latin teacher Jerome in "Child's Play." (Robert Marasco's 1970 Tony-winner opens Monday at the Coast Playhouse.) "It's very dark, very intense," he says of the thriller set in a Catholic boys' school. "Afterward, you feel like, 'Whoa, I've been through something.' " And he has been through a lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2002 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Playwright John Guare was worried. He owed the Signature Theatre a play, and he didn't have one. Just some notes, some scenes and a lot of research. "It all was sort of laying there in disarray," he says. "I didn't know how to pull it together." Then came Sept. 11. Guare, who lives downtown, not far from the World Trade Center site, says, "I looked out my window and saw the nightmare. I went out on the street and saw people covered with white ash like they'd turned to stone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2001 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is always a moment when watching a play by John Guare that a question floats through your head: Where is this thing going? Guare, perhaps more than any other American playwright, dares himself to go down a rabbit hole to see if he'll get to the other side. That certainly seems to have been the case with his 1977 play, "Landscape of the Body," though by the time it's over, you are astonished to realize that Guare knew where he was going all along.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Manhattan in August. The shrinks have abandoned their patients, cruelly. O, to "get out of this neurotic city!" So says one of playwright John Guare's New Yorkers searching for meaning, some balm in Gilead, in "Bosoms and Neglect." It remains a painful comedy after all the years since its three-performance Broadway plotz in 1979. And it's still richly, genuinely strange. The strikingly designed South Coast Repertory revival directed by David Chambers has much the same quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1996 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If you asked 50 people in the theater to name the top 10 American playwrights, all of them would have John Guare on their lists," Gregory Mosher, the former artistic director of Lincoln Center Theatre, contends.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
Watching Fred Schepisi's effective 1993 filming of the John Guare play is a bewildering experience, but bewilderment is the appropriate response to what Guare and Schepisi give you. What seems to start out as a burlesque against the rich--a satire of class-consciousness--ends up mutating into something stranger and richer and much more ambiguous.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1993 | ROGER D. FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a front corner table of Mortimer's on Lexington Avenue, playwright John Guare (silver haired, bow-tied, eyes twinkling with mischief) and actress Stockard Channing (blond-streaked and engagingly caustic in tortoise shell sunglasses) playfully jab at one another over baked apples and crab cakes. "We've known each other for 23 years," remarks Channing wryly as a photographer shoots away. "Has it been 23?" asks Guare with mock surprise. "I guess so."
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
Watching Fred Schepisi's effective 1993 filming of the John Guare play is a bewildering experience, but bewilderment is the appropriate response to what Guare and Schepisi give you. What seems to start out as a burlesque against the rich--a satire of class-consciousness--ends up mutating into something stranger and richer and much more ambiguous.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE
John Guare's "Muzeeka" at the Attic Theatre in Hollywood wears the patina of its age. Written in 1968, it is a young man's work, obvious in its embrace of popular dramatic devices of the time, and in its repudiations of mainstream society and the Vietnam War. In contrast, it bears connections to Guare's most recent work. "Four Baboons Adoring the Sun" centers on archeological digs in Sicily; "Muzeeka's" anti-hero is obsessed with the Etruscans.
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