Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Gutfreund
IN THE NEWS

John Gutfreund

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 17, 1991 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren E. Buffett's willingness to take over as chairman of Salomon Bros. marks the second time in four years that the Nebraska billionaire has rushed to help the troubled New York investment banking company and its brash chairman, John H. Gutfreund. At Gutfreund's request, Buffett's investment company lent Salomon $700 million in 1987 to buy up the firm's own shares and foil an apparent takeover attempt by corporate raider Ronald O. Perelman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 19, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Gutfreund Takes Fortune to Court: The former Salomon Inc. chairman is suing the magazine, saying it libeled him by incorrectly reporting that he was barred from the securities industry for life after the 1991 Treasury bond scandal. In a suit filed in New York County Supreme Court, Gutfreund's attorneys say he "has never been barred or suspended from the securities business, not even for one day."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Salomon Chairman Seeks Back Pay: John Gutfreund has asked a New York court to overturn an arbitration panel's decision denying him $55.3 million in back pay and other compensation. Gutfreund contends that the New York Stock Exchange panel's decision ignored the terms of his contract with Salomon Inc. and violated New York state law barring employers from withholding earned compensation.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NYSE Denies Gutfreund's $56.3-Million Claim: A New York Stock Exchange arbitration panel rejected John Gutfreund's claim against the company he once led, Salomon Inc. The three-member panel said Gutfreund's claims against Salomon and its Salomon Bros. Inc. subsidiary were "denied in their entirety." In addition, the panel said Gutfreund must pay $96,000 in forum fees. Gutfreund, toppled in the wake of Salomon's August, 1991, U.S.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NYSE Denies Gutfreund's $56.3-Million Claim: A New York Stock Exchange arbitration panel rejected John Gutfreund's claim against the company he once led, Salomon Inc. The three-member panel said Gutfreund's claims against Salomon and its Salomon Bros. Inc. subsidiary were "denied in their entirety." In addition, the panel said Gutfreund must pay $96,000 in forum fees. Gutfreund, toppled in the wake of Salomon's August, 1991, U.S.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1992 | Associated Press
Former Salomon Inc. Chairman John H. Gutfreund will pay a $100,000 fine and never again run a Wall Street firm to settle charges stemming from last year's government bond scandal, officials said Thursday. Gutfreund and two other former top Salomon officials consented--without admitting wrongdoing--to allegations that they failed to supervise adequately the firm's brokerage unit, which admitted making bogus bids in Treasury auctions.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first action against Salomon Bros. executives since a scandal that rocked Wall Street last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday filed civil fraud charges against two former government bond traders it accused of submitting false bids in U.S. Treasury securities auctions.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salomon Bros.' former chairman and chief executive, John H. Gutfreund, went to Washington in late June or early July to answer a Treasury undersecretary's questions about a possible "squeeze" in a May Treasury auction but denied knowledge of it and never mentioned that he knew of earlier wrongdoing by the firm, sources confirmed Thursday. A Salomon spokesman said he couldn't confirm the exact date of the meeting with Treasury Undersecretary Robert Glauber.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1989 | From Reuters
Salomon Inc. Chairman John Gutfreund says the big Wall Street investment bank is well on the road to recovery from its recent troubles, and denies Wall Street rumors that it is contemplating a leveraged buyout. In a turbulent recent history, the firm's earnings have declined steeply since their peak in 1986 and it has seen the departure of a number of key executives, the layoff of about 1,000 employees and an unwanted investment by corporate raider Ronald O. Perelman.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's nothing bigger than the $2.2-trillion market for U.S. Treasury securities, and that's a problem. Critics have argued for years that the Treasury market is too lightly regulated and that the 40 "primary dealer" brokerages and banks that dominate it operate too much as a private club. The Salomon Inc.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1992 | Associated Press
Former Salomon Inc. Chairman John H. Gutfreund will pay a $100,000 fine and never again run a Wall Street firm to settle charges stemming from last year's government bond scandal, officials said Thursday. Gutfreund and two other former top Salomon officials consented--without admitting wrongdoing--to allegations that they failed to supervise adequately the firm's brokerage unit, which admitted making bogus bids in Treasury auctions.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first action against Salomon Bros. executives since a scandal that rocked Wall Street last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday filed civil fraud charges against two former government bond traders it accused of submitting false bids in U.S. Treasury securities auctions.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salomon Bros.' former chairman and chief executive, John H. Gutfreund, went to Washington in late June or early July to answer a Treasury undersecretary's questions about a possible "squeeze" in a May Treasury auction but denied knowledge of it and never mentioned that he knew of earlier wrongdoing by the firm, sources confirmed Thursday. A Salomon spokesman said he couldn't confirm the exact date of the meeting with Treasury Undersecretary Robert Glauber.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government on Sunday punished Salomon Bros. by curtailing the Wall Street giant's right to bid on Treasury bonds and notes, but it rescinded a much harsher penalty just hours after announcing it. The Treasury first completely barred Salomon from Treasury auctions, an unprecedented and potentially devastating ban for a firm which routinely makes billion-dollar bids for Treasury securities. But the Treasury backed down after billionaire investor Warren E.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salomon Bros., one of Wall Street's most powerful firms, said Friday that both its chairman and president will resign in an attempt to quell a burgeoning scandal over its illegal bidding in the market for U.S. Treasury securities. The firm said that Warren E. Buffett, 60, a widely respected investor and one of the wealthiest men in America, will take over temporarily as chairman and chief executive.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1991 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren E. Buffett's willingness to take over as chairman of Salomon Bros. marks the second time in four years that the Nebraska billionaire has rushed to help the troubled New York investment banking company and its brash chairman, John H. Gutfreund. At Gutfreund's request, Buffett's investment company lent Salomon $700 million in 1987 to buy up the firm's own shares and foil an apparent takeover attempt by corporate raider Ronald O. Perelman.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government on Sunday punished Salomon Bros. by curtailing the Wall Street giant's right to bid on Treasury bonds and notes, but it rescinded a much harsher penalty just hours after announcing it. The Treasury first completely barred Salomon from Treasury auctions, an unprecedented and potentially devastating ban for a firm which routinely makes billion-dollar bids for Treasury securities. But the Treasury backed down after billionaire investor Warren E.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's nothing bigger than the $2.2-trillion market for U.S. Treasury securities, and that's a problem. Critics have argued for years that the Treasury market is too lightly regulated and that the 40 "primary dealer" brokerages and banks that dominate it operate too much as a private club. The Salomon Inc.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|