Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn H Kissick
IN THE NEWS

John H Kissick

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 31, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
There are not too many people on Wall Street or anywhere who could fill the giant shoes of Michael Milken, the modern-day J. P. Morgan whose innovative use of high-yield "junk bonds" transformed corporate America and made Drexel Burnham Lambert a Wall Street juggernaut. Therefore, John H. Kissick won't even try. He will design and fill his own shoes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer and
At lunchtime at the annual Drexel Burnham Lambert "junk bond" extravaganza, the rich, the mighty and the famous found little white books next to their plates titled, "Tom Smith and his Incredible Bread Machine." The book is a parable in verse about a man who invents an amazing machine that produces bread for under a penny a loaf. He feeds the world and becomes tremendously rich. But he then is vilified by the press, indicted on false charges and cast down.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer and
At lunchtime at the annual Drexel Burnham Lambert "junk bond" extravaganza, the rich, the mighty and the famous found little white books next to their plates titled, "Tom Smith and his Incredible Bread Machine." The book is a parable in verse about a man who invents an amazing machine that produces bread for under a penny a loaf. He feeds the world and becomes tremendously rich. But he then is vilified by the press, indicted on false charges and cast down.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
There are not too many people on Wall Street or anywhere who could fill the giant shoes of Michael Milken, the modern-day J. P. Morgan whose innovative use of high-yield "junk bonds" transformed corporate America and made Drexel Burnham Lambert a Wall Street juggernaut. Therefore, John H. Kissick won't even try. He will design and fill his own shoes.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
If Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc.'s "junk bond" wizard Michael Milken is eventually forced out of the firm by his considerable legal problems, John H. Kissick, the head of Drexel's West Coast corporate finance department, is likely to be designated head of Drexel's all-important operations in Beverly Hills, according to knowledgeable sources at the firm.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1988
John H. Kissick, an executive vice president and director of corporate finance in the Beverly Hills office of Drexel Burnham Lambert, has been named a member of the New York-based investment house's 16-member executive committee and appointed a director of its holding company. Kissick, 46, West Coast corporate finance chief for Drexel since 1975, has overseen the firm's enormous growth as an investment banker.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
The "Predators Ball" began today in Beverly Hills with a reserved tip of the hat to absent Michael Milken, founder of the junk bond market it celebrates. Milken, top junk bond trader for Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc., can't be at the annual event the company calls the Institutional Research Conference, which attracts a who's who of corporate takeover artists.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
Webster's New World Dictionary defines junk as "useless or worthless stuff"; Drexel Burnham Lambert, king of the "junk bond" underwriters, obviously has a different view. And while Drexel has long since abandoned its attempts to rub out the term junk bonds, the investment banker is working hard to change the image of the bonds and to deflect attempts by Congress to limit uses of the high-yield, less-than-investment-grade securities.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW
Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. on Tuesday named Allan Sher, 58, the senior management official assigned last year to supervise the firm's Beverly Hills operations, to the additional post of vice chairman. With the addition of Sher, the firm will have three vice chairmen, including Fred Joseph, the firm's chief executive, and Herbert Bachelor, who oversees corporate finance activities.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Drexel Burnham Lambert's lucrative high-yield "junk bond" department in Beverly Hills must undergo several notable managerial and policy changes--including the firing of junk bond impresario Michael Milken--following the firm's settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission. But the unit that generates as much as half of Drexel's profit and made the firm a Wall Street giant will be allowed to stay in Beverly Hills. And its basic ability to conduct trading and other activities are not expected to be significantly hindered, company officials and industry observers said Thursday.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
If Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc.'s "junk bond" wizard Michael Milken is eventually forced out of the firm by his considerable legal problems, John H. Kissick, the head of Drexel's West Coast corporate finance department, is likely to be designated head of Drexel's all-important operations in Beverly Hills, according to knowledgeable sources at the firm.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Michael Milken, the disgraced king of "junk bonds," for the first time won't be there. But Drexel Burnham Lambert nevertheless expects a record turnout this week for its annual "Predators Ball" at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. "We've had to put a moratorium on new people coming" to the conference, which starts Wednesday, said Steven Anreder, a Drexel spokesman. Drexel never liked the appellation "Predators Ball" for its high-yield bond conference.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1987 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Drexel Burnham Lambert, the New York investment house with the high-profile presence in Beverly Hills, has squabbled with Wall Street colleagues for years over the merits of "junk bonds." So it should not surprise anyone that Drexel executives contradict the prevailing view among analysts and money managers that the future for the high-yield, high-risk investments is clouded by the stock market crash and fears of a recession.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|