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John H Sununu

NEWS
December 3, 1989
JAMES A. BAKER III: The 59-year-old secretary of state is one of President Bush's closest advisers . . . has argued that Bush should respond positively to Gorbachev's initiatives and take advantage of openings created by rapid changes in Eastern Europe . . . friend of Bush since 1950s . . . comes from one of Houston's wealthiest and most prominent families . . . became involved in politics when Bush recruited him to work in his unsuccessful 1970 Senate race . . .
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NEWS
May 21, 1990
GLOBAL REACH? The Drug Enforcement Administration is about to begin a major personnel shake-up designed to mollify critics who see its top brass as too short on practical experience and too prone to John Wayne-style tactics. The shuffle is timed to come just before the DEA steps up its overseas activities as part of the Bush Administration's rapidly widening war on drugs.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Justice Department is investigating the official travel of former Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos, including the possible improper use of "frequent flier" bonus points to pay for trips taken by his wife, Peggy Sue, officials said Friday. Government regulations require civil servants to turn over such bonuses to the government. For the last year, the U.S. Education Department's inspector general has been investigating whether the former secretary abused those and other travel rules.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu offered "8-to-5" odds Saturday that Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega would be out of power within six months. Sununu, interviewed on Cable News Network's Evans and Novak program, made the statement after defending the Bush Administration's handling of the U.S. response to the attempted coup against Noriega last Tuesday. "We certainly would like to see him out.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly six weeks after controversy began over his frequent flying on government aircraft, White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu remains a powerful--but no longer unchallenged--figure within the Bush inner circle, according to numerous Administration officials interviewed in recent days.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Monday strongly defended White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, saying that the former governor has apologized for the controversy over his private travel and that he still has confidence in him. "He'd told me right from the heart that he regretted very much any controversy and anything that might have been done to diminish the ethical standards of this presidency," Bush told reporters in Kennebunkport, Me. "I told him, 'Look, I understand this.'
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The White House on Saturday defended Chief of Staff John H. Sununu against new allegations that he took personal and political trips at taxpayer expense and let private sponsors pay for a ski vacation. As a result of the dispute over Sununu's trips, President Bush's legal staff prepared to tighten rules on his use of government aircraft. The policy review by White House counsel C.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu reported Tuesday that all four of his ski vacations over the last two years qualified as official trips, requiring taxpayers to pay for his use of a military jet, because he gave speeches while visiting the slopes. The disclosure came in White House documents designed to show that Sununu reimbursed the government for all personal and political travel on military airplanes.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Jon Healey
In the spirit of bipartisanship, I propose that Americans give both President Obama, a Democrat, and former New Hampshire Gov. John H. Sununu, a Republican, the benefit of the doubt. On Friday, Obama said, "If you've got a business -- you didn't build that," a remark that drew howls of derision from conservatives. Responding to Obama on Tuesday, Sununu (a surrogate for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney) said that the president should "learn how to be an American," prompting some to accuse him of playing the "birther" card . I don't think either man revealed some deeper, darker truth about their beliefs.
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