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John H Taylor

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January 28, 1990
What an utterly mean-spirited review of John Gardner's "On Leadership" (Book Review, Jan. 7) by John H. Taylor. Who selects these reviewers and who chooses what they are to review? It almost appears as if (Richard) Nixon's (aide) Taylor was lying in wait for Common Cause's Gardner to settle old scores. But please , not in the Book Review. PAT BALES SANTA MONICA
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1996
In his vicious attack on Henry Kissinger (letter, Feb. 4), Oliver Stone has graphically proved the central assertion made by many critics of his film "Nixon"--namely, that Stone's purpose was not to enlighten people about the 37th president but instead to spread disinformation about the central events of his public life, especially the war in Vietnam. The goal of Richard Nixon and Kissinger was to withdraw American forces from Vietnam in a manner that would permit the non-Communist government in Saigon to defend itself and to deter Hanoi's persistent aggression.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1994
The June 10 letter by Cal State Fullerton's Arthur Hansen was written with all the chest-thumping certitude of his profession. It was also grossly misleading. As any scholar with even a passing understanding of the history of the materials of the Nixon White House knows, it was Congress, not President Nixon, who changed the rules of ownership of those materials--so egregiously that the courts finally ruled in 1992 that he was as entitled to compensation as a property owner whose land is seized for a freeway right of way. If the President had, as the professor writes, a "lamentable penchant for confounding public with private property," it was one he shared with every President from George Washington to Lyndon Johnson.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1996 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If you prefer facts to fantasy, come to Yorba Linda." The words ran in the center of a paid ad in The Times on Dec. 24, under the headline "You Choose" and photographs of Anthony Hopkins as Richard Nixon and of the real-life former president and his wife. The captions, respectively, were "Oliver Stone's 'Commercial Fiction' " and "Three-Dimensional Reality." The purveyor of reality in this case was the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace, which has been waging a low-profile battle with filmmaker Oliver Stone over his take on the 37th president in "Nixon," released last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1989
In seeking to rebut Roger Morris' "diatribe" ("While Tittering at Nixon, Don't Underestimate the Web He Wove," Op-Ed Page, March 5), ex-President Nixon's assistant John H. Taylor (letter, April 1) offers a fascinating insight into the Nixonian mentality: "Someday, we as a nation will have to come to terms with what happened in Indochina when American authority was withdrawn." What authority? The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution that grew out of Lyndon Johnson's hoax and that Congress later repudiated by passing the War Powers Act?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hugh Hewitt, executive director of the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace, will step down as head of California's first presidential library to resume practicing law full time, a library spokesman said Friday. Hewitt, who oversaw the library's opening ceremonies that drew four Presidents and dozens of dignitaries to Yorba Linda on July 19, will be replaced by John H. Taylor, Nixon's chief of staff for the past 10 years. Taylor, who will take over as executive director of the library on Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1996
In his vicious attack on Henry Kissinger (letter, Feb. 4), Oliver Stone has graphically proved the central assertion made by many critics of his film "Nixon"--namely, that Stone's purpose was not to enlighten people about the 37th president but instead to spread disinformation about the central events of his public life, especially the war in Vietnam. The goal of Richard Nixon and Kissinger was to withdraw American forces from Vietnam in a manner that would permit the non-Communist government in Saigon to defend itself and to deter Hanoi's persistent aggression.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1996 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If you prefer facts to fantasy, come to Yorba Linda." The words ran in the center of a paid ad in The Times on Dec. 24, under the headline "You Choose" and photographs of Anthony Hopkins as Richard Nixon and of the real-life former president and his wife. The captions, respectively, were "Oliver Stone's 'Commercial Fiction' " and "Three-Dimensional Reality." The purveyor of reality in this case was the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace, which has been waging a low-profile battle with filmmaker Oliver Stone over his take on the 37th president in "Nixon," released last month.
BOOKS
February 26, 1989 | Dick Lochte, Lochte's most recent novel, "Laughing Dog," will be reprinted in paperback by Warner Books this fall. His next novel, "The Burial Society," will be published later this year.
"No matter how many friends he may think he has in the press . . . the President must recognize that his relationship with the media is inherently adversarial." These cautionary words from a recent issue of TV Guide were penned by no less an experienced hand at adversarial press relationships than Richard Nixon. They might well have been used as the basis for the debut novel by his chief aide, John H. Taylor's, about a White House under siege by the Washington Post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1994
The June 10 letter by Cal State Fullerton's Arthur Hansen was written with all the chest-thumping certitude of his profession. It was also grossly misleading. As any scholar with even a passing understanding of the history of the materials of the Nixon White House knows, it was Congress, not President Nixon, who changed the rules of ownership of those materials--so egregiously that the courts finally ruled in 1992 that he was as entitled to compensation as a property owner whose land is seized for a freeway right of way. If the President had, as the professor writes, a "lamentable penchant for confounding public with private property," it was one he shared with every President from George Washington to Lyndon Johnson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hugh Hewitt, executive director of the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace, will step down as head of California's first presidential library to resume practicing law full time, a library spokesman said Friday. Hewitt, who oversaw the library's opening ceremonies that drew four Presidents and dozens of dignitaries to Yorba Linda on July 19, will be replaced by John H. Taylor, Nixon's chief of staff for the past 10 years. Taylor, who will take over as executive director of the library on Sept.
BOOKS
January 28, 1990
What an utterly mean-spirited review of John Gardner's "On Leadership" (Book Review, Jan. 7) by John H. Taylor. Who selects these reviewers and who chooses what they are to review? It almost appears as if (Richard) Nixon's (aide) Taylor was lying in wait for Common Cause's Gardner to settle old scores. But please , not in the Book Review. PAT BALES SANTA MONICA
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1989
In seeking to rebut Roger Morris' "diatribe" ("While Tittering at Nixon, Don't Underestimate the Web He Wove," Op-Ed Page, March 5), ex-President Nixon's assistant John H. Taylor (letter, April 1) offers a fascinating insight into the Nixonian mentality: "Someday, we as a nation will have to come to terms with what happened in Indochina when American authority was withdrawn." What authority? The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution that grew out of Lyndon Johnson's hoax and that Congress later repudiated by passing the War Powers Act?
BOOKS
February 26, 1989 | Dick Lochte, Lochte's most recent novel, "Laughing Dog," will be reprinted in paperback by Warner Books this fall. His next novel, "The Burial Society," will be published later this year.
"No matter how many friends he may think he has in the press . . . the President must recognize that his relationship with the media is inherently adversarial." These cautionary words from a recent issue of TV Guide were penned by no less an experienced hand at adversarial press relationships than Richard Nixon. They might well have been used as the basis for the debut novel by his chief aide, John H. Taylor's, about a White House under siege by the Washington Post.
BOOKS
October 29, 1989
As it happens, I had read "The Acting President" by Bob Schieffer and Gary Paul Gates before I read John H. Taylor's review of it in the Oct. 15 Book Review. Taylor squealed mightily as his icon of a President was exposed as the fraud it was. He takes the authors to task for their prejudices and biases, but in so doing, only exposes his own. ANN BARTUNEK, SANTA FE SPRINGS
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994
John H. Taylor, director of the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace, will discuss the former President's recent trip to Russia at a free lecture Monday. Taylor accompanied Nixon to Moscow in March and will share his insights about the fact-finding mission. He will also discuss Nixon's controversial decision to meet with opposition leaders such as Alexander Rutskoi and Vladimir Zhirinovsky. Nixon's meetings angered Russian President Boris Yeltsin.
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