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John Hagar

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Ask John Hagar about the state of the state's prisons and he gets right to the point. California's correctional system is in crisis, he says, and the governor's election-year ambitions are bedeviling efforts to fix it. Last week, Hagar laid out his case at an extraordinary hearing in a San Francisco courtroom. As stunned onlookers stifled gasps, Hagar, a special master overseeing prison reforms for a federal judge, fired a barrage of accusations at Gov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Ask John Hagar about the state of the state's prisons and he gets right to the point. California's correctional system is in crisis, he says, and the governor's election-year ambitions are bedeviling efforts to fix it. Last week, Hagar laid out his case at an extraordinary hearing in a San Francisco courtroom. As stunned onlookers stifled gasps, Hagar, a special master overseeing prison reforms for a federal judge, fired a barrage of accusations at Gov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports.
California's prisons director denied in federal court Friday that he had impeded an investigation into allegations that Pelican Bay State Prison guards had committed perjury in inmate-abuse cases. "I didn't shut down any investigation," Edward Alameida testified to a court-appointed investigator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A Los Angeles federal judge refused Monday to allow American Indians housed at Lompoc federal prison to wear headbands during meals, but their attorney was given time to prove that the headwear has religious significance. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld
Beside a field of rolling tumbleweed in this remote Central Valley town, the state opened its newest prison in 2005 with a modern design, cutting-edge security features and a serious environmental problem. The drinking water pumped from two wells at Kern Valley State Prison contained arsenic, a known cause of cancer, in amounts far higher than a federal safety standard soon to take effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The County Probation Department began its defense Tuesday in Superior Court against an American Civil Liberties Union class-action suit alleging grossly overcrowded and inadequate conditions at Juvenile Hall. County representatives agreed with criticism that Juvenile Hall is overcrowded, but maintained that efforts are being made to reduce the number of detainees who sometimes nearly double the facility's approved occupancy level of 219.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1986 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Mainly by speeding up the transfer of state parole violators and by sending minor violators home instead of to jail, Los Angeles County Sheriff Sherman Block has met a federal court-imposed deadline to reduce the inmate population at the Men's Central Jail to 6,800 prisoners. But just barely.
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
A court-appointed monitor says Pelican Bay State Prison has failed to move quickly or firmly enough against guards and other staff who used excessive force against inmates.
OPINION
January 20, 2004
Working in California's vast correctional system is often dangerous, and most prison guards carry out their jobs honorably. Nothing, however, can excuse what federal investigator John Hagar revealed in a blistering report on the prison system released last week: a pervasive "code of silence" that protects rogue guards who pummel inmates and sometimes prod them into fights, and that is condoned by leaders who "neither understand nor care about the need for fair investigations."
OPINION
February 4, 2004
Experts who studied the miserable lives of juvenile inmates in the charge of the California Youth Authority released reports this week showing a system in worse shape than most outsiders could have imagined. The state subjects its charges to the harshest punishments of any juvenile detention system nationwide, leaving teenagers confined in steel-mesh cages when guards aren't prying them from their cells with mace and tear gas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1987 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
Following an accord to speed up court proceedings, a Los Angeles federal judge Wednesday voided his requirement that Los Angeles County comply with his order to limit jail crowding. His action was expected in the wake of an agreement last week by Los Angeles County, state courts in Los Angeles and the American Civil Liberties Union to try to reduce crowding by speeding up court procedures for defendant inmates. Most of the 22,000 inmates in county jails are awaiting trials. U.S.
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