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John Hammergren

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BUSINESS
August 30, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co., the world's largest printer maker and No. 2 seller of personal computers, said McKesson Corp. Chief Executive John Hammergren would join its board. Hammergren will be the 11th member and the board's ninth outside director, Palo Alto-based Hewlett-Packard said. San Francisco-based McKesson is the biggest U.S. drug distributor.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Three members of Hewlett-Packard Co.'s troubled board of directors, including its chairman, will quit their posts after barely being reelected two weeks ago. The shake-up follows widespread criticism that HP botched an $11-billion acquisition of British software company Autonomy. The three directors were seen as those most directly involved in that deal and several of the board's other unpopular moves in recent years. Raymond Lane has given up his post as chairman but will remain a director, the Palo Alto company announced Thursday.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Three members of Hewlett-Packard Co.'s troubled board of directors, including its chairman, will quit their posts after barely being reelected two weeks ago. The shake-up follows widespread criticism that HP botched an $11-billion acquisition of British software company Autonomy. The three directors were seen as those most directly involved in that deal and several of the board's other unpopular moves in recent years. Raymond Lane has given up his post as chairman but will remain a director, the Palo Alto company announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co., the world's largest printer maker and No. 2 seller of personal computers, said McKesson Corp. Chief Executive John Hammergren would join its board. Hammergren will be the 11th member and the board's ninth outside director, Palo Alto-based Hewlett-Packard said. San Francisco-based McKesson is the biggest U.S. drug distributor.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
John Hammergren, chairman of San Francisco-based McKesson Corp., received compensation valued at $22.6 million for guiding the nation's largest prescription drug distributor to a record profit in its last fiscal year. Hammergren's package, disclosed in a regulatory filing, included $11 million in bonuses and a $1.37-million salary. He also was awarded stock options and restricted stock that had an estimated value of $9.65 million when they were granted.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2002
* A legal assistant who tried to sell the trial strategy of plaintiffs suing cigarette makers to tobacco industry lawyers was sentenced to 21/2 years in prison. Said Farraj, 28, a former paralegal at the New York office of Orrick, Harrington & Sutcliffe, pleaded guilty in October to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and interstate transportation of stolen property.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
McKesson HBOC Inc., the largest U.S. drug wholesaler, said Wednesday that it will lower its fiscal 1999 earnings by $152.2 million, or 53 cents a share, as it fixes accounting improprieties at its software unit that caused its stock to lose more than half its value since January. San Francisco-based McKesson said the problems at its HBOC software unit caused it to slash $327.4 million off revenue for three fiscal years. It cut earnings for fiscal 1998 by $25.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
McKesson HBOC Inc. on Monday named co-chief executive John Hammergren as sole president and CEO and said it was restructuring its money-losing Internet unit, led by co-CEO David Mahoney, who will leave the company. The largest U.S. drug wholesaler said it will take a fiscal fourth-quarter charge of an undetermined amount for restructuring. The changes are effective April 1.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Hewlett-Packard  Co. shareholders voted in favor of the current board at an annual meeting Wednesday, shrugging off a campaign by some investors to ignite a protest over a series of troubled acquisitions. HP announced that all 11 directors received at least 50% of the vote in their favor. The results of the vote were announced at the end of HP's annual shareholder meeting, held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. The 90-minute meeting included an extensive presentation by Chief Executive Meg Whitman, who outlined the strides she believes have been made in turning around the Silicon Valley icon.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
When new compensation disclosure rules were first implemented last year, they shone a much brighter light on the perks bestowed upon chief executives, such as country club memberships, rides on the corporate jet, home security systems and rich pensions unavailable to the rank and file. An outcry ensued. After all, some shareholders asked, why does a company need to pay country club dues for someone who already makes $10 million a year? Ditto for car allowances and healthcare deductibles.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
The heat has been building on Hewlett-Packard's board as the company prepares for its annual meeting next week, with several major shareholders calling for a protest vote against some directors. In a securities filing on Monday, HP struck back against critics, arguing that a turnaround plan is in place and making progress, and that any upheaval on the board would cause a distraction. PHOTOS: Tech we want to see in 2013 "Changing the composition of the HP board of directors could be destabilizing to the company," wrote lead independent director Rajiv L. Gupta in a letter to shareholders.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2005 | From Associated Press
Prescription drug distributor McKesson Corp. has been a headache to shareholders for years, but the pain finally may be subsiding for investors in one of the nation's oldest and largest companies. The San Francisco-based company has had to cope with the fallout from a costly accounting scandal, grapple with declining profit margins and, most recently, respond to government inquiries into its business practices.
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