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John Hammond

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Some years ago, the legendary talent scout John Hammond went to Chicago to take part in a public television special staged in his honor. He was surrounded by many of the artists in whose careers he had played a seminal role; he talked with them and about them.
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BOOKS
July 16, 2006 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries" by Margaret Millar.
JOHN HENRY HAMMOND JR., the legendary talent scout and record company executive, was an emblematic figure of the American musical scene. His artistic predilections and his social activism affected the course of our culture beginning in the Depression years and continuing -- long past his death in 1987 -- into the 21st century. If that seems an excessive claim, consider that even as we speak, Bruce Springsteen's album of songs associated with Pete Seeger is high on the charts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
John Hammond, the record producer, talent scout and critic credited with the discovery or promotion of musicians ranging from Count Basie to Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, died Friday in his Manhattan apartment. He was 76. At the time he died, said CBS spokesman Robert Altshuler, a longtime friend, Hammond was listening to a recording by Billie Holiday, the late and troubled singer who was one of Hammond's major finds. Hammond had been ill for some time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Pianist John Hammond deserves a medal from west San Fernando Valley music fans for his continuing efforts to bring first-rate jazz to the area. His too-brief tenure several years ago at Fitzgerald's in the Hilton Woodland Hills attracted an impressive lineup of the Southland's finest jazz talent. Now he's in the process of establishing yet another, though very different, jazz-west outpost in the seemingly unlikely environs of Sherman Way in Canoga Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM
John Hammond knows how hard it is to keep good help. In the early 1960s, near the start of his career as a traveling blues singer and guitar player, Hammond toured Canada and happened upon a band called Levon & the Hawks. He liked them as players and got along with them as friends. In 1964 he brought them to his hometown, New York City, to back him on an album. Plans were laid for the Hawks to become Hammond's regular touring band.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
There are in all the arts non-performers who, in the final analysis, are at least as important historically as the artists they discovered and the events they precipitated. John Hammond, who died July 10 in his New York apartment, was just such a catalyst. Hammond was one of nature's rebels.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, Jim Washburn is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to the Times Orange County Edition.
There was a wild and interminable blare from John Hammond's end of a transatlantic call, making it awfully hard to hear what he was saying. Jeez, John, are those car horns? "Well, this is Rome." By now, Hammond is pretty well acclimated to the distinguishing sounds and smells of most major world cities, and quite a few of its lesser-known holes as well. It was a choice bit of prescience that his parents nicknamed him Jeep.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What we have here is a mutual admiration society. John Hammond and Duke Robillard, two of the finest blues guitarists on the planet and friends for 25 years, have joined forces on the road and in the studio. Robillard produced and played on Hammond's latest album, "Found True Love," and the two have been touring together on and off for the past year and a half.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1962, the year John Hammond's first album came out, John Kennedy was trying to figure out the Soviets and the Cubans, Wally and the Beaver were trying to figure out girls, and girls were trying to figure out how to get a date with Elvis or Little Joe Cartwright. Well, Kennedy never did, Wally and the Beav never did, and now the girls wouldn't want to. But 32 years, 31 albums and about a billion miles later, Hammond still has those blues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For some 30 years, with nothing more than his guitar, his voice, a harmonica and the stomp of his foot, John Hammond has moved audiences with blue tales of love, lust and heartbreak. * Though he has appeared and recorded with various bands over the years, his reputation as a passionate conveyor of the Delta blues tradition has been built on solo appearances, on his ability to touch listeners with the poetry of the blues masters and the simple tools of their trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
John Hammond is one of the Southland's great jazz treasures. No, not the blues-folk singer John Hammond Jr.; not even his father, the legendary jazz producer. John Hammond, the pianist -- no relation to the above -- is a veteran jazz artist who has worked with everyone from George Benson and Carmen McRae to Michael Jackson and Cuba Gooding.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blues singer John Hammond's career has been all about the nose-to-the-grindstone life of the working musician. But even in this blue-collar context, a little storybook magic has fallen--twice in fact, once at the start and now again some 40 years later. The first time was one of those only-in-L.A. scenes. Hammond, the Greenwich Village-raised son of legendary record producer and talent scout John Hammond Sr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1997 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Given his vast experience and passion for his work, a more accomplished practitioner of Mississippi Delta blues than John Paul Hammond would be hard to find. His peers have recognized his enormous talent, nominating his last three albums for Grammys. And he's even better live. Using voice, harmonica and an assortment of acoustic and National steel guitars, the veteran bluesman makes enough beautiful noise to pass for a quartet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A choice sampling of the many flavors of the blues was served up Sunday at the fourth annual Big Time Blues Festival at Gemmrig Park, where the serene, wooded setting, family-friendly atmosphere, tasty soul food and interesting arts-and-crafts concessions combined with a top-notch bill of eclectic performers to make this one heck of a fine way to spend a summer afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What we have here is a mutual admiration society. John Hammond and Duke Robillard, two of the finest blues guitarists on the planet and friends for 25 years, have joined forces on the road and in the studio. Robillard produced and played on Hammond's latest album, "Found True Love," and the two have been touring together on and off for the past year and a half.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In John Hammond's hands, a mess of blues is certainly good news. Though the songs he voices are nearly all unremittingly sad, there is such a richness of detail and depth of feeling expressed in his voice and playing that it makes woe seem worthwhile. And it pretty much took artistry of that magnitude to eclipse the good news that preceded his two shows Saturday night at the San Juan Capistrano Regional Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
John Hammond is one of the Southland's great jazz treasures. No, not the blues-folk singer John Hammond Jr.; not even his father, the legendary jazz producer. John Hammond, the pianist -- no relation to the above -- is a veteran jazz artist who has worked with everyone from George Benson and Carmen McRae to Michael Jackson and Cuba Gooding.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, Jim Washburn is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to the Times Orange County Edition.
There was a wild and interminable blare from John Hammond's end of a transatlantic call, making it awfully hard to hear what he was saying. Jeez, John, are those car horns? "Well, this is Rome." By now, Hammond is pretty well acclimated to the distinguishing sounds and smells of most major world cities, and quite a few of its lesser-known holes as well. It was a choice bit of prescience that his parents nicknamed him Jeep.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Duke Robillard and John Hammond take the stage together Saturday night at the Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana, they will be sharing the fruits of a blues partnership nearly 30 years in the making. * Robillard, 46, was a Rhode Island schoolboy when he came across early albums by Hammond, one of the first white players to plunge freely and fully into traditional blues.
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