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John Harbison

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June 8, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Massachusetts-based composer John Harbison will serve as a music adviser with the Los Angeles Philharmonic during the 1985-86 season, The Times learned Friday. The 46-year-old composer revealed, during a telephone interview from his Cambridge home, that he "will be in Los Angeles during the seven or eight weeks coinciding with the time Andre (Previn, the orchestra's newly installed music director) is in town," serving as an adviser on new music.
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August 18, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
LA JOLLA - SummerFest, one of the country's most significant chamber music festivals, devoted its annual program of new work Friday night at Sherwood Auditorium in the Museum of Contemporary Art here to three American masters. The composers - Steven Stucky, David Del Tredici and John Harbison - are major figures and had never before appeared together on a program. Their works had something to say. But the one thing the evening wasn't happened to be what it was called: "Musical Crossroads.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Composer John Harbison is a Pulitzer Prize winner, a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant recipient and teacher in the music department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. But with all those credentials, he still finds his music has a tough time getting attention. Aside from such superstars as Philip Glass and John Adams, or even the usually pop-oriented Andrew Lloyd Webber, today's serious composer usually fights an uphill battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2000
SANTA ANA 8pm Theater Visions of the apocalypse have brought out the weirdness in writers since the Book of Revelation. Jose Rivera's 1991 play, "Marisol," offers a nightmarish world in which racist skinheads run amok in a collapsing New York, a man gives birth, and the title character's guardian angel goes AWOL to join her fellow angels in a revolution against God. The surrealistic play takes off from an all-too-real premise of society's haves trying to insulate themselves from its have-nots.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Yes. The lusty birds in Libbey Park still embellish the prosaic, man-made music with rude obbligatos of their own. The noble, ancient sycamore--or what remains of it after all these decaying decades--still flanks the tiny stage in this verdant, emphatically un-Hollywoodish bowl. The ruggedly attentive audience is still divided into two classes. The devout who fill the expensive seats (top ticket: $27) still bear the indignity of hard wooden benches with stoic honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1999
Will the doomed romance of "The Great Gatsby" work as an opera? After a two- decade wait, composer John Harbison finds out Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1986 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Any musical training organization that wants to be counted must devote at least one concert per session to contemporary music. De rigueur. And never let it be said that the Los Angeles Philharmonic Institute does not want to be counted. So when its orchestra assembled Wednesday at Schoenberg Hall, UCLA, the obligation was met. Never mind that under former institute director Michael Tilson Thomas more than one such event materialized.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2000
SANTA ANA 8pm Theater Visions of the apocalypse have brought out the weirdness in writers since the Book of Revelation. Jose Rivera's 1991 play, "Marisol," offers a nightmarish world in which racist skinheads run amok in a collapsing New York, a man gives birth, and the title character's guardian angel goes AWOL to join her fellow angels in a revolution against God. The surrealistic play takes off from an all-too-real premise of society's haves trying to insulate themselves from its have-nots.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
It has been the great American century in many things, perhaps, but not opera, at least not for the great American opera company, the Metropolitan. American work is rare at the Met; new American work is rarer still. But as the clock winds down, Times Square prepares its ball, and the city bursts at the seams with harried shoppers and young revelers, the Met, Monday night, squeezed in one last premiere, John Harbison's "The Great Gatsby."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, Paul Lieberman is a Times staff writer
Right up to her death in 1986, Scottie Fitzgerald was pestered by people wanting the rights to make adaptations of her father's novel "The Great Gatsby." Never mind that a play and silent movie (since lost) were produced soon after the book's 1925 publication, then films in 1949 (with Alan Ladd) and 1974 (with Robert Redford), most all of questionable merit. Or that two TV Gatsbys (Robert Montgomery and Robert Ryan) quickly faded from memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1999
Will the doomed romance of "The Great Gatsby" work as an opera? After a two- decade wait, composer John Harbison finds out Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Yes. The lusty birds in Libbey Park still embellish the prosaic, man-made music with rude obbligatos of their own. The noble, ancient sycamore--or what remains of it after all these decaying decades--still flanks the tiny stage in this verdant, emphatically un-Hollywoodish bowl. The ruggedly attentive audience is still divided into two classes. The devout who fill the expensive seats (top ticket: $27) still bear the indignity of hard wooden benches with stoic honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra usually makes do, these days, with a music director who fiddles while the ensemble churns. Friday night at Thorne Hall on the hospitable Occidental College campus, the management reverted to its former habits, presenting the first of three concerts with a baton-wielding guest-maestro. Even so, some perplexing questions lingered regarding interpretive authority.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
While the Joffrey Ballet assumes jumpers' rights at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the Los Angeles Philharmonic is taking to the road. This week: Royce Hall, UCLA. Next week: the East Coast. The 15-mile trip west, Sunday afternoon, turned out to be something of a romantic pilgrimage. It also produced something of a sonic revelation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Composer John Harbison is a Pulitzer Prize winner, a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant recipient and teacher in the music department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. But with all those credentials, he still finds his music has a tough time getting attention. Aside from such superstars as Philip Glass and John Adams, or even the usually pop-oriented Andrew Lloyd Webber, today's serious composer usually fights an uphill battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990 | Barbara Isenberg
Some implements of the art, from left, top: A non-reproducible pencil whose marks won't be picked up on a photocopy, a cassette player with earphones for travel, an ordinary pencil, a dip pen, a raised ruler with cork, a trinome or three-speed metronome, a miniature composition book and a letter opener. Not pictured is an electric eraser that Harbison says all composers have and use constantly for taking out such things as a single notehead.
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