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John Harkes

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SPORTS
December 5, 1990
U.S. World Cup midfielder John Harkes signed a two-year contract with English second-division club Sheffield.
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SPORTS
October 26, 1998 | MIKE PENNER
With his club coach, Bruce Arena, about to be named U.S. national team coach, Harkes is hopeful of a quick return to international soccer. "Of course I want it," said Harkes, who was cut from the U.S. squad two months before the World Cup by Steve Sampson. "If I get back on the national team, it will be an honor to put the shirt on. I'll probably break out in tears. "Bruce knows me very well. He knows what I've gone through and what disappointments I've had on the national team.
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SPORTS
November 4, 1995
My response to Grahame Jones' Oct. 23 article: Go back to England and watch Kasey Keller play in Second Division games. While Mr. Jones is consistently negative about our American soccer, I would rather watch Alexi Lalas, John Harkes, Tab Ramos, et al, participate in Major League Soccer, a league that will surely grow and develop here in the United States. Since this appears contrary to Mr. Jones' desires, I hope your paper has the sense to purchase him a one-way ticket back to England.
SPORTS
May 20, 1998 | Washington Post
A six-month buildup of team discipline and conduct issues prompted U.S. national soccer team coach Steve Sampson to cut John Harkes from the World Cup roster in April, when Harkes was a starting midfielder, a 10-year veteran of the team and the squad's captain. In a private meeting before announcing Harkes' dismissal, Sampson described to Harkes the following violations, Harkes and a U.S.
SPORTS
June 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
The United States, continuing to show it can compete with the best soccer teams in the world, played a 1-1 tie Saturday with Italy. Roberto Baggio, the world's most expensive player, put the 1990 World Cup semifinalists ahead in the second minute, but then the Americans regrouped and John Harkes tied the score in the 23rd minute. It was the first goal for the Americans against the Italians in five games covering 58 years. U.S.
SPORTS
May 20, 1998 | Washington Post
A six-month buildup of team discipline and conduct issues prompted U.S. national soccer team coach Steve Sampson to cut John Harkes from the World Cup roster in April, when Harkes was a starting midfielder, a 10-year veteran of the team and the squad's captain. In a private meeting before announcing Harkes' dismissal, Sampson described to Harkes the following violations, Harkes and a U.S.
SPORTS
April 15, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States, which seldom surprises anyone when it comes to soccer, surprised almost everyone Tuesday. Steve Sampson, the U.S. national team coach, announced that John Harkes, the team's captain and a veteran of two World Cup tournaments, would not be adding a third World Cup to his resume. Harkes, 31, will not lead his country onto the field against Germany in Paris on June 15, as he had expected to do.
SPORTS
February 2, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With no games for more than two months, the soccer players of the U.S. national team have faced stiffer opposition off the field than on it. Whether that has made them battle-tested, or just battle-weary, will be revealed tonight, when they play for the first time since qualifying last November for this summer's World Cup. Their first-round opponent in the Marlboro Cup at the Orange Bowl is a familiar one, Costa Rica, which has even less World Cup experience than the United States.
SPORTS
June 27, 1994 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out of the frying pan and into the mixed zone they limped, angry at the world but glad to be alive. The game conditions had been unbearable, better suited for Lawrence of Arabia than Alexi of Detroit. The result was deplorable, a crawling, gasping 1-0 buzzard-beater by the Romanian foreign legion. And the officiating? Don't get the red-white-and-blue-in-the-faces started.
SPORTS
June 28, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The coaches and staff of the U.S. World Cup team have apparently never understood new FIFA guidelines regarding yellow cards and failed to tell the U.S. players that getting two in the first round would lead to a one-game suspension. The problem arose after Sunday's game against Romania, when midfielder John Harkes received his second yellow card--a warning about rough or illegal play.
SPORTS
May 3, 1998 | AMY SHIPLEY, WASHINGTON POST
When Steve Sampson announced the removal two weeks ago of John Harkes from the national team roster, the U.S. coach set off one of the most torrid controversies in American soccer in recent memory. It was not just Sampson's decision to cut Harkes that unleashed great surprise, but the manner in which Sampson presented the news. Harkes was a U.S. team starter, a veteran of two World Cups and in his third season as team captain.
SPORTS
April 15, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States, which seldom surprises anyone when it comes to soccer, surprised almost everyone Tuesday. Steve Sampson, the U.S. national team coach, announced that John Harkes, the team's captain and a veteran of two World Cup tournaments, would not be adding a third World Cup to his resume. Harkes, 31, will not lead his country onto the field against Germany in Paris on June 15, as he had expected to do.
SPORTS
October 23, 1996 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Top American soccer players reached contract agreements with the U.S. Soccer Federation Tuesday, ensuring that they will play in World Cup qualifying, which begins Nov. 3 against Guatemala. Most of the players who helped the United States reach the second round of the 1994 World Cup are involved in the agreement, including Alexi Lalas, John Harkes, Tab Ramos and Eric Wynalda. "I am very pleased that this situation has been resolved and that the United States soccer fans will have all their stars to cheer for," said Alan Rothenberg, president of the USSF.
SPORTS
November 4, 1995
My response to Grahame Jones' Oct. 23 article: Go back to England and watch Kasey Keller play in Second Division games. While Mr. Jones is consistently negative about our American soccer, I would rather watch Alexi Lalas, John Harkes, Tab Ramos, et al, participate in Major League Soccer, a league that will surely grow and develop here in the United States. Since this appears contrary to Mr. Jones' desires, I hope your paper has the sense to purchase him a one-way ticket back to England.
SPORTS
July 2, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Way back in the good old days, in pre-Colombian times, it was nothing to talk to a player on the U.S. soccer team, ask a straight question and get a thoughtful, straight answer. The team's coach is not included in this scenario, of course, but he has always allowed his players to speak freely with reporters. Now, in the post-Romanian era, the muzzle has been strapped on.
SPORTS
June 28, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The coaches and staff of the U.S. World Cup team have apparently never understood new FIFA guidelines regarding yellow cards and failed to tell the U.S. players that getting two in the first round would lead to a one-game suspension. The problem arose after Sunday's game against Romania, when midfielder John Harkes received his second yellow card--a warning about rough or illegal play.
SPORTS
June 11, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, especially when played by the United Gaelic and Sean McGonigol Pipe Band. All of the band members, most of whom are bagpipers, were wearing kilts, except for one of the drummers, Tony Meola. "We let him stand in occasionally," a band member said of the Italian-American goalkeeper for the U.S. soccer team, "but we call him Tony (Mike) Meola."
SPORTS
June 27, 1994 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out of the frying pan and into the mixed zone they limped, angry at the world but glad to be alive. The game conditions had been unbearable, better suited for Lawrence of Arabia than Alexi of Detroit. The result was deplorable, a crawling, gasping 1-0 buzzard-beater by the Romanian foreign legion. And the officiating? Don't get the red-white-and-blue-in-the-faces started.
SPORTS
June 11, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, especially when played by the United Gaelic and Sean McGonigol Pipe Band. All of the band members, most of whom are bagpipers, were wearing kilts, except for one of the drummers, Tony Meola. "We let him stand in occasionally," a band member said of the Italian-American goalkeeper for the U.S. soccer team, "but we call him Tony (Mike) Meola."
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