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John Harte

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BUSINESS
February 12, 2001 | KAREN E. KLEIN
John Harte is a newspaper photographer and part-time photojournalism instructor who dreamed up a business photographing individual athletes during competition. Since Harte's idea--providing parents with digital custom sports portfolios rather than team pictures or speculation photos--is a new concept, he has had a slow start. Recently, however, he has found ways to provide his clients with the tools to market the idea for him. Harte was interviewed by freelance writer Karen E. Klein.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Most TV fans of a certain age know the answer to the question, "Who played the Lone Ranger?" Those who say Clayton Moore are correct, at least partially. There was another actor who played the Masked Man on "The Lone Ranger" TV series, temporarily replacing Moore in the title role for 52 episodes beginning in 1952. John Hart, 91, the handsome and athletic actor who also starred in the 1940s movie serial "Jack Armstrong: The All-American Boy" and the 1950s TV series "Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans," died Sunday at his home in Rosarito Beach in Baja California, said his wife, Beryl.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Most TV fans of a certain age know the answer to the question, "Who played the Lone Ranger?" Those who say Clayton Moore are correct, at least partially. There was another actor who played the Masked Man on "The Lone Ranger" TV series, temporarily replacing Moore in the title role for 52 episodes beginning in 1952. John Hart, 91, the handsome and athletic actor who also starred in the 1940s movie serial "Jack Armstrong: The All-American Boy" and the 1950s TV series "Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans," died Sunday at his home in Rosarito Beach in Baja California, said his wife, Beryl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
John Hart Ely, an influential constitutional law scholar and author who taught at Yale, Harvard and Stanford, where he served as dean of the law school from 1982 to 1987, has died. He was 64. Ely died Oct. 25 in Miami of cancer. He had taught at Stanford until 1996, when he moved to Florida as the Richard A. Hausler Professor of Law at the University of Miami.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
John Hart Ely, an influential constitutional law scholar and author who taught at Yale, Harvard and Stanford, where he served as dean of the law school from 1982 to 1987, has died. He was 64. Ely died Oct. 25 in Miami of cancer. He had taught at Stanford until 1996, when he moved to Florida as the Richard A. Hausler Professor of Law at the University of Miami.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget ESPN. Forget the sports page. When it comes to baseball, they provide little more than box scores and batting averages. Only the Baseball Poetry Hotline offers day-by-day poetic interpretations of major-league action. Only this telephone service promises recorded messages of universal truth, the Zen and gestalt of the national pastime. "I won't tell you what some guy's batting average is because I don't care," said John W. Hart III, the hot line's voice and muse.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1998 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If you love the songs played on country radio stations these days, John Hart is a hero. If you don't, he's a villain. Hart polls country music fans and then uses the data to help record companies decide which songs to promote and which to dump. Seventeen Nashville record labels pay his company, John Hart Media Inc., a $2,000 to $3,000 monthly retainer for polling information. Detractors see Hart as an unwelcome gatekeeper who keeps the wraps on exciting new music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | JOANNA M. MILLER
Warm and sunny Christmas Day weather drew hundreds to Ventura beaches to try out new Christmas toys, play in the sun and walk off heavy holiday meals. Temperatures on Friday were in the mid-60s to mid-70s throughout the county, bolstered by Santa Ana conditions that created a warm, dry breeze from the east. Chris Zumba of San Jose and his brother Rick, a Ventura resident, took a late afternoon stroll down the promenade in Ventura after dinner as the sun set behind the Channel Islands.
NEWS
March 29, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Acid rainfall in the western United States, while still far less severe than in the East, poses an "apparent" threat of environmental damage to wide stretches of sensitive wilderness and watershed lands, a new analysis of pollution and geological data from Western states concludes.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2001 | KAREN E. KLEIN
John Harte is a newspaper photographer and part-time photojournalism instructor who dreamed up a business photographing individual athletes during competition. Since Harte's idea--providing parents with digital custom sports portfolios rather than team pictures or speculation photos--is a new concept, he has had a slow start. Recently, however, he has found ways to provide his clients with the tools to market the idea for him. Harte was interviewed by freelance writer Karen E. Klein.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1998 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If you love the songs played on country radio stations these days, John Hart is a hero. If you don't, he's a villain. Hart polls country music fans and then uses the data to help record companies decide which songs to promote and which to dump. Seventeen Nashville record labels pay his company, John Hart Media Inc., a $2,000 to $3,000 monthly retainer for polling information. Detractors see Hart as an unwelcome gatekeeper who keeps the wraps on exciting new music.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget ESPN. Forget the sports page. When it comes to baseball, they provide little more than box scores and batting averages. Only the Baseball Poetry Hotline offers day-by-day poetic interpretations of major-league action. Only this telephone service promises recorded messages of universal truth, the Zen and gestalt of the national pastime. "I won't tell you what some guy's batting average is because I don't care," said John W. Hart III, the hot line's voice and muse.
OPINION
July 21, 2011 | By Mary Ellen Harte and Anne Ehrlich
Think back on what you talked about with friends and family at your last gathering. The latest game of your favorite team? "American Idol"? An addictive hobby? The new movie blockbuster? In a serious moment, maybe job prospects, Afghanistan, the economic mess? We live in an information-drenched environment, one in which sports and favorite programs are just a click away. And the ease with which we can do this allows us to focus on mostly comforting subjects that divert our attention from increasingly real, long-term problems.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
At precisely 12:01 a.m., Frank Fournier snaps into action. Fournier on one knee. Snap. Fournier standing on a chair. Snap-snap. Fournier belly-down on the barroom floor. Snap. "Fantastic!" Fournier says to himself, squinting through the smoke. "Good, good. Very good. Ah, oui! " On the dance floor, seven young women line themselves up, affecting boredom to screen a residual self-consciousness. Up on the stage, a beefy type in a cowboy hat flexes and preens.
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