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John Hawkes

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NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
John Hawkes would prefer that you, dear reader, not get to know him too well. Nothing personal, you understand. It's just that Hawkes, known for playing Sol Star in HBO's "Deadwood" and Bugsy in "The Perfect Storm" opposite George Clooney, believes that it's best for a working actor not to let his personal life upstage his screen personas. "I feel like my real strength as an actor is that no one quite knows me," Hawkes said, hanging out one recent afternoon at the Hollywood club where he sometimes plays in a band when he's not on camera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
A host of major awards contenders will make their world premieres at this year's Toronto International Film Festival, including John Wells' family drama “August: Osage County,” Jean-Marc Vallee's period AIDS film “The Dallas Buyers Club” and Jason Reitman's literary adaptation “Labor Day.” The movies will be joined by a number of fall hopefuls making their North American debuts north of the border, including Ron Howard's Formula 1...
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
If truth, as they say, is stranger than fiction, sometimes it's also more compelling. In their new film, "The Sessions," costars John Hawkes and Helen Hunt found plenty of inspiration in their characters' real-life counterparts: the late Mark O'Brien, an author confined to an iron lung after contracting polio as a boy, and Cheryl Cohen Greene, the sex surrogate he enlisted to help him lose his virginity at age 38. At a recent installment of The...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
On Sunday night, it's the actors' turn. Many critics groups and the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. have already weighed in with their favorite films and performances of the year, and now the time has come for the Screen Actors Guild Awards. Oscar enthusiasts will be closely watching how the thespians vote for the guild's motion picture cast prize. Competing for the actors' equivalent of a best picture Oscar are "Argo," "Lincoln," "Les Miserables," "Silver Linings Playbook," and "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By John Horn
Anybody who has seen "The Sessions," which opened last weekend to strong business in limited release, would likely agree that the film deserves an R rating, assigned by the Motion Picture Assn. of America for "strong sexuality including graphic nudity and frank dialogue. "  But 100% of that "graphic nudity" comes from Helen Hunt, who plays the film's sex surrogate and often wears not a stitch of clothing. John Hawkes, who plays Mark O'Brien, the polio patient who hires Hunt to lose his virginity, is bare from the waist up, yet the actor never does the Full Monty.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Fred Schruers
To say that John Hawkes and Helen Hunt are "relaxed" around each other - after spending a month last year making "The Sessions," a film that reveals a strikingly intimate series of sex therapy sessions - doesn't quite do justice to their friendship. A good clue comes early on when Hunt, all mock seriousness, answers a question that hasn't been asked. "We had a torrid affair," she says with the air of one just trying to help. "You know that - I thought that was in the press materials.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Noel Murray
The Sessions Available on VOD beginning Jan. 29 Before he died, polio-stricken poet Mark O'Brien wrote an article about his experiences having sex for the first time, with a therapist. Writer-director Ben Lewin adapted the article into a simple, heartfelt movie with John Hawkes as O'Brien and Helen Hunt as the sexual surrogate. The movie is primarily an actors' showcase - in fact, Hunt was just nominated for an Academy Award for her role - and isn't about visual flourishes or storytelling surprises.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - In "The Sessions," John Hawkes plays a journalist who writes romantic poetry, tells dry, self-deprecating jokes and wiles away his afternoons in bed with a beautiful woman. He's just another sigh-inducing, big screen heartthrob, in other words - except for the iron lung. "The Sessions," which opens Friday, is the mostly true and surprisingly upbeat story of Mark O'Brien, a polio victim who decided to lose his virginity at the age 38 with the help of a sex surrogate. Written and directed by Ben Lewin, himself a polio survivor, and costarring Helen Hunt as the surrogate, the movie presented Hawkes with a host of physical challenges, from contorting his body painfully to duplicate O'Brien's twisted spine to mastering the disabled man's halting breathing style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2005 | Robert Abele
The long, tall, rough-voiced appeal of John Hawkes -- a kind of sad, drifter charm -- is getting quite a workout these days. Hot on the heels of the second-season close of HBO's "Deadwood," in which Hawkes plays merchant Sol Star without the cliched bookishness usually given portrayals of Jews in westerns, he's in writer-director Miranda July's award-winning indie "Me and You and Everyone We Know" and has just wrapped a role in the "Miami Vice" movie.
BOOKS
September 8, 1996 | Susan Salter Reynolds
THE FROG by John Hawkes (Viking: $21.95, 191 pp.). A scary little novel, this, the way Grimm's Fairy Tales and "The Wizard of Oz" and even "James and the Giant Peach" are scary. "The Frog" is a fable in which the narrator's perversions roil beneath the memories of his childhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Noel Murray
The Sessions Available on VOD beginning Jan. 29 Before he died, polio-stricken poet Mark O'Brien wrote an article about his experiences having sex for the first time, with a therapist. Writer-director Ben Lewin adapted the article into a simple, heartfelt movie with John Hawkes as O'Brien and Helen Hunt as the sexual surrogate. The movie is primarily an actors' showcase - in fact, Hunt was just nominated for an Academy Award for her role - and isn't about visual flourishes or storytelling surprises.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Academy voters don't particularly like to reward comedies, but they are nuts about movies spotlighting characters battling their not-so-beautiful minds. How will that dichotomy affect David O. Russell's exuberant "Silver Linings Playbook," which deals with the relationship between a bipolar man and his despairing neighbor? Time to check in with the Oscar 8-Ball, that magical portal into the minds and hearts and, in the rare applicable instance, the souls of academy members and how they'll be voting this awards season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Watching the Golden Globe nominations in the darkness of Thursday morning, what struck me was the darkness of the year. It has been a season of discontent in film, not for the faint of heart. Instead, we've been asked to witness - and weather - a preponderance of thunderous artistic visions blowing through theaters like so many perfect storms. Last year's love affair with the ebullient "The Artist" seems a distant memory. Instead, retribution rules the day. Challenging, provoking, raising uncomfortable questions about life, love, faith, politics, integrity, infirmity and betrayal, the directors emerging as the ones to reckon with are proving to be a soul-searching and soul-searing bunch, not inclined to mince words.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Hollywood Foreign Press voters didn't go for Johnny Depp or Brad Pitt this year, saving their lead actor surprises for men who headlined smaller, more intimate films. In the comedy-musical category, lead honors went to Jack Black for the dark indie character study "Bernie," Ewan McGregor's turn as a fisheries expert in the little-seen "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen" and Bill Murray's portrayal of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the small-budget biopic "Hyde Park on Hudson. " More high-profile performances by Bradley Cooper ("Silver Linings Playbook")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Susan King
Oscar-winning actress Helen Hunt ("As Good as It Gets") will receive the Spotlight Award at the 24th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival awards gala Jan. 5 at the Palm Springs Convention Center. The festival takes place Jan. 3-14. "Few can claim the artistic distinctions of Helen Hunt," said film festival chairman Harold Matzner in a statement Thursday. "A consummate actress, director, producer and screenwriter, Hunt's talents are myriad. " The 49-year-old Hunt, who won four Emmys in the 1990s for her role in the NBC comedy series "Mad About You," has received strong notices in the new film "The Sessions," as a professional sex surrogate who helps a man (John Hawkes)
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Fred Schruers
To say that John Hawkes and Helen Hunt are "relaxed" around each other - after spending a month last year making "The Sessions," a film that reveals a strikingly intimate series of sex therapy sessions - doesn't quite do justice to their friendship. A good clue comes early on when Hunt, all mock seriousness, answers a question that hasn't been asked. "We had a torrid affair," she says with the air of one just trying to help. "You know that - I thought that was in the press materials.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Susan King
Oscar-winning actress Helen Hunt ("As Good as It Gets") will receive the Spotlight Award at the 24th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival awards gala Jan. 5 at the Palm Springs Convention Center. The festival takes place Jan. 3-14. "Few can claim the artistic distinctions of Helen Hunt," said film festival chairman Harold Matzner in a statement Thursday. "A consummate actress, director, producer and screenwriter, Hunt's talents are myriad. " The 49-year-old Hunt, who won four Emmys in the 1990s for her role in the NBC comedy series "Mad About You," has received strong notices in the new film "The Sessions," as a professional sex surrogate who helps a man (John Hawkes)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
As predictably as swallows fly to Capistrano, dream-chasers traditionally flock to the West Coast. John Hawkes' one-man show "Nimrod Soul" at Theatre/Theater dramatizes the personal consequences for various hopefuls crushed by the Hollywood dream machine. All of Hawkes' characters are small-towners ("nimrods," i.e. hicks) whose rural antecedents make the adjustment to big-city life a particular challenge. Jade, a career waitress, cautions a starry-eyed new employee that she, too, once came to L.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
It's not hard to imagine why people would be intrigued by the unique story of Mark O'Brien, a journalist confined to an iron lung who, nearing age 40, enlisted a sex surrogate to help him lose his virginity. Writer-director Ben Lewin was clearly one such person, as his new film "The Sessions," starring John Hawkes and Helen Hunt, is based on O'Brien's life. O'Brien's story had particular resonance for Lewin, who, like O'Brien, contracted and survived polio at a young age. But as Lewin told Times film reporter John Horn during a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series, he wasn't sure at first whether his personal background was influencing his notion that O'Brien's story could make for a successful feature film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
There's a thin line between desperation and inspiration, at least according to Ben Lewin, director of "The Sessions. " The film tells the mostly true story of Mark O'Brien (played by John Hawkes), a 38-year-old journalist and poet confined to an iron lung who enlists a sex surrogate (Helen Hunt) to help him lose his virginity. At a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series hosted by Times film reporter John Horn, Lewin shared the film's origin story. "I think like a lot of worthy enterprises, it starts with an act of desperation," he said.
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