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John Hendricks

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Meg James
Discovery Communications Inc. Executive Chairman John S. Hendricks has exercised stock options worth $12.7 million, according to a regulatory filing. The 61-year-old company founder sold 144,179 shares of Discovery common stock on Oct. 31 for prices ranging from $85.75 a share to $88.92 a share, according to a filing late Monday with the Securities & Exchange Commission. Hendricks had accumulated the options several years ago as part of his long-term compensation program. He benefited from the company's soaring value, although the timing of the stock sale was part of a predetermined schedule.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Discovery stock has increased 60% during the last year; it closed Monday at $87.07 a share.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks will retire as chairman of the board of the cable giant in May. Hendricks, a science buff who worked in academia, launched Discovery Channel in 1985 and over the years the company went from owning a handful of educational outlets to a global media juggernaut filled with popular reality shows. Besides its flagship channel Discovery, the company also owns TLC, Animal Planet and 50% of Oprah Winfrey's OWN Network. “Few words can appropriately convey what kind of person John is, or what he has meant to this company and the cable television industry overall.  He is a true visionary, a man of enormous integrity and one of the world's great entrepreneurs," Discovery President and Chief Executive David Zaslav said in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Joe Flint
A new distribution platform is emerging and no one knows what to make of it. The established players are wary of it and see it as more foe than friend. Others are afraid of losing their shirt by investing in it. Sound familiar? But this isn't the Internet. This was cable television in the early 1980s. Back then there were only a handful of networks and few were talking about 500 channels full of original content. "It was an unproven business, investors were not convinced that cable programming was a good investment," said John Hendricks, founder of Discovery Communications.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Meg James
Discovery Communications Inc. Executive Chairman John S. Hendricks has exercised stock options worth $12.7 million, according to a regulatory filing. The 61-year-old company founder sold 144,179 shares of Discovery common stock on Oct. 31 for prices ranging from $85.75 a share to $88.92 a share, according to a filing late Monday with the Securities & Exchange Commission. Hendricks had accumulated the options several years ago as part of his long-term compensation program. He benefited from the company's soaring value, although the timing of the stock sale was part of a predetermined schedule.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Discovery stock has increased 60% during the last year; it closed Monday at $87.07 a share.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1995 | WARREN BERGER, Warren Berger is a free-lance writer based in New York. He writes about media and advertising for the New York Times, Advertising Age and GQ. His last article for this magazine was "Chaos on Madison Avenue."
Last winter, as the air in Washington rang with politicians' cries to "zero out" government funding for public broadcasting, with some calling for the head of Barney the Dinosaur on a platter, John Hendricks was characteristically quiet. All he did was write a letter. It would have been understandable if Hendricks, who runs cable TV's Discovery Channel and The Learning Channel, had joined the public television lynch mob--if only to watch and gloat. After all, Hendricks, perhaps even more than House Speaker Newt Gingrich is nudging PBS--ever so gently--toward the precipice.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 1995
John Hendricks is probably a smart and nice guy, and the Discovery Channel does program some excellent shows ("The Brains Behind Smart TV," by Warren Berger, June 25). Once again, however, a cable network has been allowed to express its audience numbers in terms of "reaching 64 million homes," and that is pure baloney. Discovery may indeed be wired into that many homes, but that doesn't mean it's being watched in all those places. For example, here in Los Angeles, where the Discovery Channel can be seen by 64% of the market, it is actually viewed by only 27% of all the homes in the L.A. area.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks will retire as chairman of the board of the cable giant in May. Hendricks, a science buff who worked in academia, launched Discovery Channel in 1985 and over the years the company went from owning a handful of educational outlets to a global media juggernaut filled with popular reality shows. Besides its flagship channel Discovery, the company also owns TLC, Animal Planet and 50% of Oprah Winfrey's OWN Network. “Few words can appropriately convey what kind of person John is, or what he has meant to this company and the cable television industry overall.  He is a true visionary, a man of enormous integrity and one of the world's great entrepreneurs," Discovery President and Chief Executive David Zaslav said in a statement.
SPORTS
April 11, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the huge success locally of last summer's Women's World Cup, Los Angeles will not have a team in the women's professional soccer league set to begin play in April 2001. The Women's United Soccer Assn. (WUSA) on Monday identified its eight initial franchise cities and announced that it had signed a four-year cable TV contract with Time Warner Inc. The league conditionally named Atlanta, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Orlando-Tampa Bay, San Diego, San Francisco and Washington D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Meg James
Discovery Communications Chief Executive David Zaslav might run one of the smallest of the major media companies, but his pay remains in the big leagues. Zaslav last year collected compensation valued at $33.3 million, according to Discovery's proxy, which was filed Friday afternoon with the Securities and Exchange Commission. That amount represented a more than 30% drop over Zaslav's 2012 pay arrangement, which was valued at $49.9 million. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Zaslav in 2013 received a base salary of $3 million, a $5.8-million cash bonus and $22.5 million in stock option awards.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Time Warner Inc. Chief Executive Jeff Bewkes is indisputably among the nation's highest-paid executives, but compared with his fellow media moguls, he is eking out a meager living. The New York media conglomerate that owns Warner Bros., HBO, TNT and Time magazine revealed Monday that Bewkes' 2011 compensation package was worth $25.9 million, down 1% from 2010. David Zaslav, CEO of Discovery Communications Inc., meanwhile, got a 23% raise in 2011 to $52.4 million. Other recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission revealed that, although there was some disparity, media chiefs again were richly rewarded.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Joe Flint
A new distribution platform is emerging and no one knows what to make of it. The established players are wary of it and see it as more foe than friend. Others are afraid of losing their shirt by investing in it. Sound familiar? But this isn't the Internet. This was cable television in the early 1980s. Back then there were only a handful of networks and few were talking about 500 channels full of original content. "It was an unproven business, investors were not convinced that cable programming was a good investment," said John Hendricks, founder of Discovery Communications.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 1995
John Hendricks is probably a smart and nice guy, and the Discovery Channel does program some excellent shows ("The Brains Behind Smart TV," by Warren Berger, June 25). Once again, however, a cable network has been allowed to express its audience numbers in terms of "reaching 64 million homes," and that is pure baloney. Discovery may indeed be wired into that many homes, but that doesn't mean it's being watched in all those places. For example, here in Los Angeles, where the Discovery Channel can be seen by 64% of the market, it is actually viewed by only 27% of all the homes in the L.A. area.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1995 | WARREN BERGER, Warren Berger is a free-lance writer based in New York. He writes about media and advertising for the New York Times, Advertising Age and GQ. His last article for this magazine was "Chaos on Madison Avenue."
Last winter, as the air in Washington rang with politicians' cries to "zero out" government funding for public broadcasting, with some calling for the head of Barney the Dinosaur on a platter, John Hendricks was characteristically quiet. All he did was write a letter. It would have been understandable if Hendricks, who runs cable TV's Discovery Channel and The Learning Channel, had joined the public television lynch mob--if only to watch and gloat. After all, Hendricks, perhaps even more than House Speaker Newt Gingrich is nudging PBS--ever so gently--toward the precipice.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1987
Union Bancorp, parent of Union Bank, Los Angeles, said William H. Wofford has been named executive vice president-credit policy and administration, replacing the retiring Robert H. Schoubye. Wofford will also become general manager-asset quality control for the holding company. Replacing Wofford as senior vice president-banking group administration is John O. Fox Jr., who was previously senior vice president-international services. His successor is John B. Hendricks. James R.
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