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John Henrik Clarke

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NEWS
July 18, 1998 | From Times Wires Services
John Henrik Clarke never got around to writing his life story, which encompassed some of the more turbulent periods in American history. But time will not forget the former history professor who died at the age of 83 Thursday at St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital in New York City after a heart attack. A pioneer in urging African and African American studies at Hunter College, where he taught from 1968 to 1985, he developed most of the department's curriculum.
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NEWS
July 18, 1998 | From Times Wires Services
John Henrik Clarke never got around to writing his life story, which encompassed some of the more turbulent periods in American history. But time will not forget the former history professor who died at the age of 83 Thursday at St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital in New York City after a heart attack. A pioneer in urging African and African American studies at Hunter College, where he taught from 1968 to 1985, he developed most of the department's curriculum.
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NEWS
March 17, 1991
The March 3 article "Elder Statesmen" by Yemi Toure is reporting par excellence. Reading about the lives and works of five black race-conscious and scholarship-oriented authors--John Henrik Clarke, John G. Jackson, Chancellor Williams, Yusef ben-Jochannan and John Hope Franklin--brought satisfaction to my heart. It is unfortunate that only a small segment of the black population and an even smaller number of white people are aware of contributions these elder statesmen have made toward reclaiming authentic black history.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The video rental shop, a modest storefront nestled in a row of several set back from busy Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, wouldn't seem to pose much of a threat to such video goliaths as Blockbuster or the Wherehouse. But Video Charles has an edge on the competition: It has more than 2,000 black-oriented selections, many of which are hard to find anywhere else in Los Angeles.
NEWS
November 1, 1987
As a follow-up to an August tribute to historian, author, educator and poet John Henrik Clarke, the Board of Trustees of Compton Community College has authorized establishment of the Clarke Faculty Fellowship. "This brilliant man has devoted his life to the education of black people," said Emily Hart-Holifield, board president. "Therefore, we decided to honor him by establishing a $700 faculty fellowship in his name to be used for the purpose of promoting excellence in teaching."
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | YEMI TOURE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 8:30 on a Friday evening at the carpeted, cozy Eso Won bookstore in South-Central Los Angeles. But the body clock of Henrik Clarke, 76, who had just flown in from New York for a book-signing party in his honor, said it was already 11:30 p.m., his normal bedtime.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The video rental shop, a modest storefront nestled in a row of several set back from busy Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, wouldn't seem to pose much of a threat to such video goliaths as Blockbuster or the Wherehouse. But Video Charles has an edge on the competition: It has more than 2,000 black-oriented selections, many of which are hard to find anywhere else in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
John Henrik Clarke, John G. Jackson and Chancellor Williams are among authors from the United States and around the world whose books and audio- and videotapes are riding the rising crest of interest in black history and culture. In the Southland, more and more customers are turning to the handful of black bookstores and special libraries to satisfy that interest. Among them: Aquarian Books, 3995 S. Western Ave., Space 12, Los Angeles, (213) 296-1633. Black and Latino Bookstore, 1920 N.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's too bad that television doesn't seem to have an appropriate format to deal with short stories. The rich, dramatic texturing of the three tales by African American authors that have been dramatized for HBO's "America's Dream" provides impressive evidence of the absorbing potential of this far too neglected form. Richard Wright's "Long Black Song," placed in the rural South of the early '30s, deals with one of the essential black-white issues without settling upon cheap or easy solutions.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
When friends tried to discourage Enoch Sneed and Oba Williams from opening a bookstore in Los Angeles last summer, citing the civil unrest and a slack economy, the couple would have none of it. "Opening a bookstore made sense," Sneed said. "Our motivation was to fill a gap. . . . The No. 1 one thing that's needed in the community is information. It was time to do it."
NEWS
March 17, 1991
The March 3 article "Elder Statesmen" by Yemi Toure is reporting par excellence. Reading about the lives and works of five black race-conscious and scholarship-oriented authors--John Henrik Clarke, John G. Jackson, Chancellor Williams, Yusef ben-Jochannan and John Hope Franklin--brought satisfaction to my heart. It is unfortunate that only a small segment of the black population and an even smaller number of white people are aware of contributions these elder statesmen have made toward reclaiming authentic black history.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | YEMI TOURE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 8:30 on a Friday evening at the carpeted, cozy Eso Won bookstore in South-Central Los Angeles. But the body clock of Henrik Clarke, 76, who had just flown in from New York for a book-signing party in his honor, said it was already 11:30 p.m., his normal bedtime.
NEWS
November 1, 1987
As a follow-up to an August tribute to historian, author, educator and poet John Henrik Clarke, the Board of Trustees of Compton Community College has authorized establishment of the Clarke Faculty Fellowship. "This brilliant man has devoted his life to the education of black people," said Emily Hart-Holifield, board president. "Therefore, we decided to honor him by establishing a $700 faculty fellowship in his name to be used for the purpose of promoting excellence in teaching."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1997 | BOOTH MOORE
The spirit of African culture is at the Museum of Natural History this weekend with the opening of the exhibition, "Africa: One Continent, Many Worlds" (See story, Page 41.) Here are some other places to experience the world's second-largest continent--as well as the culture and traditions it spawned in America. Friday Evening The Fairfax district may be best known for its string of Jewish delis, bakeries and shops, but it's also a commercial center for L.A.'s Ethiopian community.
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