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John Henry Browne

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May 10, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
  SEATTLE - Colton Harris-Moore, the serial burglar who led authorities on a chase through several states and three countries as the “ Barefoot Bandit ,” pleaded guilty to the last of the charges against him this week, but he would like the public to know he is not discouraged by the seven-year prison term he's serving. “I am working with amazing people, and I will have a beautiful life,” Harris-Moore said in a handwritten note released by his lawyers. “If there is any truth I've learned, it is that absolutely anything is possible,” he wrote.
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NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. -- A stream of prosecution witnesses spoke Wednesday of families torn apart, of children left with physical and emotional scars and of lasting damage to the military's relationship with Afghan civilians because of the rampage U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales pleaded guilty to perpetrating. But as the sentencing hearing continued, defense attorney John Henry Browne wanted to simply introduce the jury to "Bobby. " Bales' brother and a longtime family friend talked about "Good Time Bobby," the fun-loving guy from a blue-collar family in Norwood, Ohio.
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NATIONAL
March 23, 2012 | Richard A. Serrano
Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder Friday in a case that could lead to the death penalty. Bales allegedly armed himself with a pistol, rifle and grenade launcher and shot men, women and children in a nighttime raid that stands as the worst American atrocity since the beginning of the war in Afghanistan. The charges -- given to Bales Friday at the high-security Army prison at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. -- also include six counts of attempted murder and six of assault carried out in two remote villages in southern Afghanistan on March 11. The incident has deeply shaken U.S.-Afghan relations and fueled outrage against the U.S. and its continued presence in that country.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales has agreed to plead guilty to the killing of 16 Afghan civilians who were shot to death in their homes outside a U.S. Army outpost in a violent rampage his lawyers have said was brought on by stress fueled with alcohol and drugs. Bales, 39, will enter the plea June 5 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state as part of an agreement in which the government will not seek the death penalty, according to his lawyer, John Henry Browne. "I didn't think we'd be getting to this point, but if they take the death penalty off the table, we're able to work it out," Browne said in an interview.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales has agreed to plead guilty to the killing of 16 Afghan civilians who were shot to death in their homes outside a U.S. Army outpost in a violent rampage his lawyers have said was brought on by stress fueled with alcohol and drugs. Bales, 39, will enter the plea June 5 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state as part of an agreement in which the government will not seek the death penalty, according to his lawyer, John Henry Browne. "I didn't think we'd be getting to this point, but if they take the death penalty off the table, we're able to work it out," Browne said in an interview.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. -- A stream of prosecution witnesses spoke Wednesday of families torn apart, of children left with physical and emotional scars and of lasting damage to the military's relationship with Afghan civilians because of the rampage U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales pleaded guilty to perpetrating. But as the sentencing hearing continued, defense attorney John Henry Browne wanted to simply introduce the jury to "Bobby. " Bales' brother and a longtime family friend talked about "Good Time Bobby," the fun-loving guy from a blue-collar family in Norwood, Ohio.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
For tens of thousands of fans from Italy to South America, Colton Harris-Moore was the "Barefoot Bandit," a teenage fugitive whose odyssey of stolen planes, boats and expensive SUVs confounded sheriffs deputies and FBI agents for more than two years. "Fly, Colton, fly!" some wrote on the Facebook page that sprang up to document his flight through three countries — a flight that ended last year when someone recognized him at a vacation resort in the Bahamas, resulting in a dramatic chase and, finally, his capture.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Military prosecutors Wednesday painted a picture of increasing frustration for Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales - passed over for promotion at work, unhappy with his family - in the weeks before he allegedly killed 16 civilians in a middle-of-the-night shooting rampage in southern Afghanistan. Questioning one of Bales' closest Army friends, 1st Sgt. Vernon Bigham, prosecutor Lt. Col. Joseph Morse repeatedly asked about Bales' expressions of unhappiness about much of his life, including the strict rules of engagement that prevented his unit from being "aggressive" with Afghans and his strong belief that he should have been promoted to sergeant first class just before the March 11 killings.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The Army staff sergeant suspected of killing 16 civilians in southern Afghanistan had been redeployed to a war zone despite being promised that his third previous combat tour in Iraq would be his last, his attorney said Thursday evening. The 38-year-old soldier is in "shock" and faces the possibility that military lawyers will seek the death penalty, said lawyer John Henry Browne, who spoke with his client briefly by telephone where he was being held in Kuwait. Military lawyers have said they will not identify the suspect until they are ready to file criminal charges against him in military court.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Colton Harris-Moore's nearly four-year odyssey as the "Barefoot Bandit" came to a conclusion Friday when a federal judge sentenced him to 61/2 years in prison for the theft of airplanes, boats and guns in an audacious swath of crime that stretched from Washington state to the Bahamas. "I should have died years ago," Harris-Moore, 20, said in his first public statement since his arrest in 2010 shortly after he crash-landed one of his stolen planes on an island in the Caribbean. "I'd like to first say that what I did could be called daring, but it is no stretch of the imagination to say that I'm lucky to be alive," Harris-Moore, speaking in diffident tones and dressed in jail-issue khakis, told U.S. District Judge Richard A. Jones.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
  SEATTLE - Colton Harris-Moore, the serial burglar who led authorities on a chase through several states and three countries as the “ Barefoot Bandit ,” pleaded guilty to the last of the charges against him this week, but he would like the public to know he is not discouraged by the seven-year prison term he's serving. “I am working with amazing people, and I will have a beautiful life,” Harris-Moore said in a handwritten note released by his lawyers. “If there is any truth I've learned, it is that absolutely anything is possible,” he wrote.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Military prosecutors Wednesday painted a picture of increasing frustration for Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales - passed over for promotion at work, unhappy with his family - in the weeks before he allegedly killed 16 civilians in a middle-of-the-night shooting rampage in southern Afghanistan. Questioning one of Bales' closest Army friends, 1st Sgt. Vernon Bigham, prosecutor Lt. Col. Joseph Morse repeatedly asked about Bales' expressions of unhappiness about much of his life, including the strict rules of engagement that prevented his unit from being "aggressive" with Afghans and his strong belief that he should have been promoted to sergeant first class just before the March 11 killings.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Military prosecutors Wednesday painted a picture of increasing frustration for Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales - passed over for promotion at work, unhappy with his family - in the weeks before he allegedly killed 16 civilians in a middle-of-the-night shooting rampage in southern Afghanistan. Questioning one of Bales' closest Army friends, 1st Sgt. Vernon Bigham, prosecutor Lt. Col. Joseph Morse repeatedly asked about Bales' expressions of unhappiness about much of his life, including the strict rules of engagement that prevented his unit from being “aggressive” with Afghans and his strong belief that he should have been promoted to sergeant first class just before the March 11 killings.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - John Henry Browne's first brush with the U.S. military was during the Vietnam War. The lanky attorney, then a student who drove a purple hippie van, was rejected for the draft because he was too tall. "I had done research, and I knew if you were over 6 foot 6 you were not qualified to go kill short people," said Browne, who has a 1969 photo of himself in an Uncle Sam hat towering above a sea of fellow antiwar protesters. "So I'd done a bunch of yoga and stretched myself - and I got some help from some Quaker doctors - and I went in with a letter saying I was close to 6-7, which I was at the time.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2012 | Richard A. Serrano
Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder Friday in a case that could lead to the death penalty. Bales allegedly armed himself with a pistol, rifle and grenade launcher and shot men, women and children in a nighttime raid that stands as the worst American atrocity since the beginning of the war in Afghanistan. The charges -- given to Bales Friday at the high-security Army prison at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. -- also include six counts of attempted murder and six of assault carried out in two remote villages in southern Afghanistan on March 11. The incident has deeply shaken U.S.-Afghan relations and fueled outrage against the U.S. and its continued presence in that country.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The Army staff sergeant suspected of killing 16 civilians in southern Afghanistan had been redeployed to a war zone despite being promised that his third previous combat tour in Iraq would be his last, his attorney said Thursday evening. The 38-year-old soldier is in "shock" and faces the possibility that military lawyers will seek the death penalty, said lawyer John Henry Browne, who spoke with his client briefly by telephone where he was being held in Kuwait. Military lawyers have said they will not identify the suspect until they are ready to file criminal charges against him in military court.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Military prosecutors Wednesday painted a picture of increasing frustration for Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales - passed over for promotion at work, unhappy with his family - in the weeks before he allegedly killed 16 civilians in a middle-of-the-night shooting rampage in southern Afghanistan. Questioning one of Bales' closest Army friends, 1st Sgt. Vernon Bigham, prosecutor Lt. Col. Joseph Morse repeatedly asked about Bales' expressions of unhappiness about much of his life, including the strict rules of engagement that prevented his unit from being “aggressive” with Afghans and his strong belief that he should have been promoted to sergeant first class just before the March 11 killings.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - John Henry Browne's first brush with the U.S. military was during the Vietnam War. The lanky attorney, then a student who drove a purple hippie van, was rejected for the draft because he was too tall. "I had done research, and I knew if you were over 6 foot 6 you were not qualified to go kill short people," said Browne, who has a 1969 photo of himself in an Uncle Sam hat towering above a sea of fellow antiwar protesters. "So I'd done a bunch of yoga and stretched myself - and I got some help from some Quaker doctors - and I went in with a letter saying I was close to 6-7, which I was at the time.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Colton Harris-Moore's nearly four-year odyssey as the "Barefoot Bandit" came to a conclusion Friday when a federal judge sentenced him to 61/2 years in prison for the theft of airplanes, boats and guns in an audacious swath of crime that stretched from Washington state to the Bahamas. "I should have died years ago," Harris-Moore, 20, said in his first public statement since his arrest in 2010 shortly after he crash-landed one of his stolen planes on an island in the Caribbean. "I'd like to first say that what I did could be called daring, but it is no stretch of the imagination to say that I'm lucky to be alive," Harris-Moore, speaking in diffident tones and dressed in jail-issue khakis, told U.S. District Judge Richard A. Jones.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
For tens of thousands of fans from Italy to South America, Colton Harris-Moore was the "Barefoot Bandit," a teenage fugitive whose odyssey of stolen planes, boats and expensive SUVs confounded sheriffs deputies and FBI agents for more than two years. "Fly, Colton, fly!" some wrote on the Facebook page that sprang up to document his flight through three countries — a flight that ended last year when someone recognized him at a vacation resort in the Bahamas, resulting in a dramatic chase and, finally, his capture.
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