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John Hersey

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NEWS
July 28, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
The New Yorker magazine that arrived in readers' mailboxes this week carried on Page 54 a Department of Amplification, the 76th in the periodical's 63-year history. In less genteel circles, an amplification might be known as a correction--or even a retraction. It seems unthinkable, however, that a writer of the stature of John Hersey might be involved in anything so unseemly as a retraction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2008 | James Hohmann
Former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist Ruben Salazar was one five distinguished journalists commemorated on a series of postage stamps issued Tuesday by the Postal Service. The series, intended to recognize journalists who broke barriers or showed great courage, features Martha Gellhorn, John Hersey, George Polk, Eric Sevareid and Salazar. First-day-issue dedication ceremonies for the 42-cent stamps were held at the National Press Club in Washington as part of the Press Club's 100th anniversary, and at the Los Angeles Times.
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NEWS
March 25, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hersey, a World War II correspondent who graphically described the horrors of the world's first atomic bomb attack and won the Pulitzer Prize for his war-based novel "A Bell for Adano" died Wednesday. He was 78. The author, who suffered a stroke a year ago and also had cancer of the colon and liver, died at 2:45 a.m. in Key West, Fla., with his family at his side, said his wife, Barbara.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
John Reagan "Tex" McCrary, a radio and television host and a publicist who masterminded the political rally that helped launch Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential campaign in 1952, died Tuesday in New York City. He was 93. With his wife, the actress and model Jinx Falkenburg, McCrary pioneered talk radio programming with the morning show "Hi Jinx" in 1946. The next year the popular couple branched out to television with "At Home."
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Pulitzer Prize-winning author John Hersey has acknowledged appropriating another writer's facts and phrases without attribution for a New Yorker article on novelist James Agee, and he offered an apology. The flap developed after Laurence Bergreen, author of "James Agee: A Life," noticed as many as 20 parallel passages in Hersey's article about Agee in the magazine's July 18 issue, the New York Times said today.
BOOKS
July 5, 1987 | Elaine Kendall
They could be songs, melancholy moods, naval uniforms, Yale men or the spectrum of tints from robin's egg to midnight, but they're not, they're the predacious marine fish, sometimes quite greenish, found only along the Atlantic coast of North and South America.
BOOKS
March 18, 1990 | Elaine Kendall
"You're hearing from a whole new John Hersey here, one who rivals every social satirist from Jane Austen to Kingsley Amis . . . a fling for all."
BOOKS
August 11, 1991 | Douglas Glover, Glover's most recent book is a novel, "The South Will Rise at Noon" (Penguin)
John Hersey is an author forged from three constituent elements: He was born in China of missionary parents, started his writing career as a reporter for Time in the '30s and '40s, and then became a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist on his first attempt at fiction.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | ELAINE KENDALL
The title is working overtime here, describing the adventure Hersey himself is enjoying as well as identifying one of the longer stories. After a distinguished half-century as a novelist, essayist, professor and general literary luminary, he's turned to short fiction with 11 stories embodying some of his particular concerns. Two of them--"God's Typhoon" and "Why Were You Sent Out Here?"--introduce Hersey the old China hand.
BOOKS
January 1, 1989 | David Kishiyama, Kishiyama, a Calendar assistant editor, was born in the Heart Mountain, Wyo., relocation camp. and
There could not be a more powerful combination than words by John Hersey and photographs by Ansel Adams. When the subject matter is "Manzanar" and the unconstitutional imprisoning of Japanese-Americans during World War II, the combination would seem to be explosive--and is.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999
Reader Jay Pellisier suggests that the similarities between the plots of the film "The Red Violin" and John Hersey's book "Antonietta" are "more than coincidence," and that "somewhere credit is due Hersey and his book" (Letters, June 13). Plagiarism is a serious allegation, but, alas, the late Mr. Hersey was himself a serial offender. I direct Pellisier's attention to pages 109-111 of Anne Fadiman's book "Ex Libris: Reflections of a Common Reader." In her essay on plagiarism, "Nothing New Under the Sun," Fadiman offers devastating evidence that Hersey was a "compulsive plagiarist" whose many targets included author Laurence Bergreen and Fadiman's mother, Annalee Jacoby Fadiman, a World War II correspondent.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hersey, a World War II correspondent who graphically described the horrors of the world's first atomic bomb attack and won the Pulitzer Prize for his war-based novel "A Bell for Adano" died Wednesday. He was 78. The author, who suffered a stroke a year ago and also had cancer of the colon and liver, died at 2:45 a.m. in Key West, Fla., with his family at his side, said his wife, Barbara.
BOOKS
August 11, 1991 | Douglas Glover, Glover's most recent book is a novel, "The South Will Rise at Noon" (Penguin)
John Hersey is an author forged from three constituent elements: He was born in China of missionary parents, started his writing career as a reporter for Time in the '30s and '40s, and then became a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist on his first attempt at fiction.
BOOKS
March 18, 1990 | Elaine Kendall
"You're hearing from a whole new John Hersey here, one who rivals every social satirist from Jane Austen to Kingsley Amis . . . a fling for all."
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | ELAINE KENDALL
The title is working overtime here, describing the adventure Hersey himself is enjoying as well as identifying one of the longer stories. After a distinguished half-century as a novelist, essayist, professor and general literary luminary, he's turned to short fiction with 11 stories embodying some of his particular concerns. Two of them--"God's Typhoon" and "Why Were You Sent Out Here?"--introduce Hersey the old China hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
When I began college, one of the men teaching freshman English was Wallace Stegner, a sturdy and open Westerner who even to a naive newcomer seemed a man set apart from the pinched pedagogical caution of my Eastern academic establishment. I was dismayed when I was assigned to another man's section and I've regretted it since.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999
Reader Jay Pellisier suggests that the similarities between the plots of the film "The Red Violin" and John Hersey's book "Antonietta" are "more than coincidence," and that "somewhere credit is due Hersey and his book" (Letters, June 13). Plagiarism is a serious allegation, but, alas, the late Mr. Hersey was himself a serial offender. I direct Pellisier's attention to pages 109-111 of Anne Fadiman's book "Ex Libris: Reflections of a Common Reader." In her essay on plagiarism, "Nothing New Under the Sun," Fadiman offers devastating evidence that Hersey was a "compulsive plagiarist" whose many targets included author Laurence Bergreen and Fadiman's mother, Annalee Jacoby Fadiman, a World War II correspondent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
John Reagan "Tex" McCrary, a radio and television host and a publicist who masterminded the political rally that helped launch Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential campaign in 1952, died Tuesday in New York City. He was 93. With his wife, the actress and model Jinx Falkenburg, McCrary pioneered talk radio programming with the morning show "Hi Jinx" in 1946. The next year the popular couple branched out to television with "At Home."
BOOKS
February 26, 1989
My co-author, Peter Wright, and I just received from friends in Los Angeles a copy of the review of our book "Manzanar" (Book Review, Jan. 1). We agree with reviewer David Kishiyama's conclusion that some of the photographs are too small. For example, the photograph entitled "Pictures and Mememtos," on Page 165, should have been printed full-page. This is one of the few still-lifes that Adams ever took, and printed large, the viewer would see the return addresses on the letters.
BOOKS
January 1, 1989 | David Kishiyama, Kishiyama, a Calendar assistant editor, was born in the Heart Mountain, Wyo., relocation camp. and
There could not be a more powerful combination than words by John Hersey and photographs by Ansel Adams. When the subject matter is "Manzanar" and the unconstitutional imprisoning of Japanese-Americans during World War II, the combination would seem to be explosive--and is.
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