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John Herzfeld

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1996 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Herzfeld is in the backseat of an airport limo that is winding its way up Laurel Canyon Boulevard. It's been more than a dozen years, but he still remembers one of the first things he read about the San Fernando Valley. There was a story in the newspaper, he recalls, an interview with some celebrity's wife. The woman joked that her Mercedes had an automatic U-turn device, so that every time she drove up Beverly Glen, it would turn around when she got to Mulholland Drive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Like many ambitious, provocative films, "15 Minutes" is a bit of a mess. Both audacious and unwieldy, exciting and excessive, this dark thriller is too long, too violent and not always convincing. But at the same time, there's no denying that it's onto something, that its savage indictment of the nexus involving media, crime and a voracious public is a cinematic statement difficult to ignore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Like many ambitious, provocative films, "15 Minutes" is a bit of a mess. Both audacious and unwieldy, exciting and excessive, this dark thriller is too long, too violent and not always convincing. But at the same time, there's no denying that it's onto something, that its savage indictment of the nexus involving media, crime and a voracious public is a cinematic statement difficult to ignore.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | JOHN HERZFELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the last 10 years, I've been increasingly fascinated by three of our culture's most potent and volatile obsessions--celebrity, wealth and violence. These days it seems people will do anything to become well known. Wondering how far they'll go to achieve that goal led me to write and direct "15 Minutes." (The New Line film opens today.) The title of my film refers to Andy Warhol's prophetic statement that "In the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1983, John Herzfeld directed his first theatrical film, the critical and box-office bomb "Two of a Kind," which starred the then-hot duo of John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. But press materials for his "2 Days in the Valley" make no reference to the earlier film, and numerous press accounts have described the new film as his first for the big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1997 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They needed Clifford Couser to really start chewing the scenery Saturday, and, with the cameras rolling, the extras roaring and the overtime money flying out the window, they were not shy about asking for it. Reality bites, and so does the Hollywood re-creation. "He has to really bite the ear!" shouted John Herzfeld, director of "Don King: Only in America," an HBO Pictures biography of the electric-haired, controversy-soaked boxing promoter. "Bite it!"
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Got some good news and some bad news. The good: A new movie may lift the San Fernando Valley out of cinematic obscurity. The bad: The picture ain't always pretty. It's a warm and hazy morning--is there any other kind in the summer?--as the crew of "2 days in the Valley" prepares to blow up a Buick. If it weren't for the stubborn "low clouds," the Hollywood Hills view from the old Errol Flynn ranch off Mulholland Drive would be spectacular.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | JOHN HERZFELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the last 10 years, I've been increasingly fascinated by three of our culture's most potent and volatile obsessions--celebrity, wealth and violence. These days it seems people will do anything to become well known. Wondering how far they'll go to achieve that goal led me to write and direct "15 Minutes." (The New Line film opens today.) The title of my film refers to Andy Warhol's prophetic statement that "In the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes."
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | Jack Mathews
Hodgepodge may not be the word writer-director John Herzfeld would use to describe his quirky 1996 black comedy, but hodgepodge it is. And that's not all bad. There are too many characters, but some are a lot of fun. The tone shifts, from graphic murder to wig-flipping farce, are too extreme, but much of it works. Danny Aiello (pictured) and James Spader star (Cinemax Wednesday at 10 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | Daniel Cerone
If producer David Brown can get "The Midnight Club" going, co-producer Sylvester Stallone will star as New York's best detective--in a wheelchair. "The movie will have state-of-the-art, wheelchair, hand-to-hand combat," Brown tells us. "It's about a New York police detective determined to extinguish a crime overlord. . . . In his single-minded desire to wipe out this man, the detective is paralyzed from the waist down and almost killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1997 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They needed Clifford Couser to really start chewing the scenery Saturday, and, with the cameras rolling, the extras roaring and the overtime money flying out the window, they were not shy about asking for it. Reality bites, and so does the Hollywood re-creation. "He has to really bite the ear!" shouted John Herzfeld, director of "Don King: Only in America," an HBO Pictures biography of the electric-haired, controversy-soaked boxing promoter. "Bite it!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1983, John Herzfeld directed his first theatrical film, the critical and box-office bomb "Two of a Kind," which starred the then-hot duo of John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. But press materials for his "2 Days in the Valley" make no reference to the earlier film, and numerous press accounts have described the new film as his first for the big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1996 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Herzfeld is in the backseat of an airport limo that is winding its way up Laurel Canyon Boulevard. It's been more than a dozen years, but he still remembers one of the first things he read about the San Fernando Valley. There was a story in the newspaper, he recalls, an interview with some celebrity's wife. The woman joked that her Mercedes had an automatic U-turn device, so that every time she drove up Beverly Glen, it would turn around when she got to Mulholland Drive.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Got some good news and some bad news. The good: A new movie may lift the San Fernando Valley out of cinematic obscurity. The bad: The picture ain't always pretty. It's a warm and hazy morning--is there any other kind in the summer?--as the crew of "2 days in the Valley" prepares to blow up a Buick. If it weren't for the stubborn "low clouds," the Hollywood Hills view from the old Errol Flynn ranch off Mulholland Drive would be spectacular.
MAGAZINE
September 3, 2000
I am always entertained to see real-life newscasters in movies ("Art Imitating Life Imitating News," So SoCal, by Craig Tomashoff, Aug. 6). However, I completely disagree that "The Simpsons" news anchor Kent Brockman is based on Jerry Dunphy. The Brockman character is clearly a combination (in appearance and name) of KTLA-TV Channel 5's Hal Fishman and KNBC-TV Channel 4's Kent Shocknek. Michele Hewitt Thousand Oaks Director John Herzfeld says New York anchors "have a little harder edge to them."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1996 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Hodgepodge may not be the word writer-director John Herzfeld would use to describe his quirky black comedy "2 Days in the Valley," but hodgepodge it is. And that's not all bad. There are too many characters, but some are a lot of fun. The tone shifts, from graphic murder to wig-flipping farce, are too extreme, but much of it works. Its style seems to imitate both Robert Altman and Quentin Tarantino yet has an energy all its own.
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