Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Hesketh
IN THE NEWS

John Hesketh

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1988 | ROBERT LACHMAN, Times Staff Writer and Robert Lachman is chief photographer for The Times Orange County Edition.
The first question people usually ask photographer John Hesketh after seeing his work is, "How is it done?" An explanation is certainly in order because the closer you look the more difficult it is to tell. Some of his photographs, such as "Ascention" and "Self Portrait," have a ghostlike quality, reminiscent of a journey through the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland, which coincidentally is very close to where Hesketh was reared.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | RON EGGERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Photographers generally think in fractions of a second. Exposures of 1/30th, 1/125th, even 1/1000th of a second, are common. But not for John Hesketh. He works with exposures lasting minutes, even hours. He is, in effect, painting with light--adding brush strokes to the latent image that is his canvas by using such sources of illumination as flashlights, TV tubes and slide projectors.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | RON EGGERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Photographers generally think in fractions of a second. Exposures of 1/30th, 1/125th, even 1/1000th of a second, are common. But not for John Hesketh. He works with exposures lasting minutes, even hours. He is, in effect, painting with light--adding brush strokes to the latent image that is his canvas by using such sources of illumination as flashlights, TV tubes and slide projectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1988 | ROBERT LACHMAN, Times Staff Writer and Robert Lachman is chief photographer for The Times Orange County Edition.
The first question people usually ask photographer John Hesketh after seeing his work is, "How is it done?" An explanation is certainly in order because the closer you look the more difficult it is to tell. Some of his photographs, such as "Ascention" and "Self Portrait," have a ghostlike quality, reminiscent of a journey through the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland, which coincidentally is very close to where Hesketh was reared.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1989 | ROBERT LACHMAN, Times Staff Writer and Robert Lachman is a staff photographer with The Times Orange County Edition
John Hesketh's photographs can give you a very eerie feeling. By day, the 34-year-old Anaheim resident puts together audio-visual slide shows for conservative Orange County businesses. But by night, he creates strikingly bizarre color images, using light sources that range from fluorescent fixtures and late-model television tubes to camp-store flashlights and open fires.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1989 | Cathy Curtis
When I first drove around Orange County four years ago, I was struck by several unfamiliar sights: breathtaking views of the ocean, strange flocks of bobbing dinosaurlike oil wells and sprawling swaths of ugly new buildings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2001 | KINNEY LITTLEFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Censored at Cypress College. Edited at John Wayne Airport. Seized by the LAPD.The list of offending artworks persists, and 33 of them are on view through Sept. 7 in the issue-laden exhibition "Banned & Barred" at BC Space Gallery in Laguna Beach. This eyeful of a show includes photographic work in diverse genres--photojournalism, nudes, still lifes--that fell prey to varying forms or threats of censorship.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991 | LISBET NILSON, Lisbet Nilson writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar.
For the fourth time since its founding in 1972, the Jan Turner Gallery has moved--this time to larger quarters at the quiet end of Melrose Avenue near Beverly Hills. Along the way, it also has spawned a new gallery of photography: the Turner/Krull Gallery, located on the open second floor of the new space. Heading the new photography venture is gallery director Craig Krull, who was director of the Jan Turner Gallery for the past three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | SUVAN GEER
Art has become big business, commanding high prices and speaking the slippery language of investment potential. But the world of economics is the front yard of politics. So art, with its once-independent criteria for excellence, has suddenly found itself on the scrimmage line in a political football game with whistles to the left and right directing the play. Just how prone to social whim the rules of that game can be is the point made by the current exhibition "Censorship."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|