Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Hiatt
IN THE NEWS

John Hiatt

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
JOHN HIATT has recorded a string of critically lauded albums dating to the mid 1970s, but his profile rose markedly in 1987 with "Bring the Family," an intimate collection of songs that included "Thing Called Love," which Bonnie Raitt subsequently popularized when she included it on her multiple Grammy-winning "Nick of Time" album in 1989. The Illinois native, who will receive a lifetime achievement award for songwriting this week at the Americana Music Assn. conference in Nashville and also will be inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in October, recently took time out to discuss the emotionally rich songs that have become a hallmark of his body of work over lunch in L.A., where he worked in the 1980s.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
For a long time in rock 'n' roll, musicians who allowed their music to be used in advertising risked sullying their artistic credibility. Nobody, however, ever said anything against getting musical inspiration from a TV commercial, which is how veteran singer-songwriter John Hiatt came up with one of the songs on his 20th studio album, "Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns," that's being released Tuesday. "I'm as influenced by popular culture as the next guy," Hiatt, 58, said from Nashville last week.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
For a long time in rock 'n' roll, musicians who allowed their music to be used in advertising risked sullying their artistic credibility. Nobody, however, ever said anything against getting musical inspiration from a TV commercial, which is how veteran singer-songwriter John Hiatt came up with one of the songs on his 20th studio album, "Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns," that's being released Tuesday. "I'm as influenced by popular culture as the next guy," Hiatt, 58, said from Nashville last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2010
Peter Gabriel "Scratch My Back" Real World . There seems to be two motivations behind Peter Gabriel's new album, one playful and the other more serious. The first gives the project its title: Gabriel covered compositions by 12 working artists, including David Bowie, Neil Young, Arcade Fire and the Magnetic Fields. He also invited them to plumb his own catalog for an upcoming answer record titled "I'll Scratch Yours." Some have called this proposition opportunistic, a way for Gabriel to both reassert his place alongside more iconic elders and make a DNA connection with arty youngsters.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1986 | CHRIS WILLMAN
John Hiatt writes the funniest sad songs--and the saddest funny songs--of just about anybody alive, and his solo shows at the very intimate McCabe's every six months or so are treasured opportunities to get close to Hiatt getting close to tragicomic truths.
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
With pop music deep into an era of production-laden hits, it's reassuring to be reminded that the creation of great music really doesn't require anything more than a pen, a guitar and somebody who knows what to do with both.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If all John Hiatt did was toil over a hot note pad as a full-time tunesmith, you might have to rank him one of the more considerable talents in American rock. But he's got the chops to deliver his own emotive material better than any of his many interpreters. And now, finally, in the form of the Guilty Dogs, he can claim a steamy little backup band that makes his deceptively simple, effortless-sounding songwriting sound like hard work all over again.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hiatt had it nailed when, after recounting a wild and woolly tromp around Tennessee in "Memphis in the Meantime," he declared: "I don't think Ronnie Milsap's gonna ever record this song." The same probably applies to his vast songbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to sorting out the crucial issues and events in his life through music, John Hiatt has not been one to hide behind symbolism, hedge with generalities or obscure his trail with indirection. What he sang on the albums that cemented his artistic standing near the top rung of contemporary pop-rock songwriters was pretty much what he had lived.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN
It's not exactly Hiattpalooza--the sound is more redolent of '70s California folk-rock than '90s Seattle grunge. But the rediscovery of rock power makes for the most consistent and immediate album by this veteran troubadour since the moving, happy/sad confessionals of his 1988 "Bring the Family."
NEWS
September 18, 2008
John Hiatt: An interview with singer-songwriter John Hiatt in Sunday's Arts & Music section described him as an Illinois native. Hiatt is from Indiana.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
JOHN HIATT has recorded a string of critically lauded albums dating to the mid 1970s, but his profile rose markedly in 1987 with "Bring the Family," an intimate collection of songs that included "Thing Called Love," which Bonnie Raitt subsequently popularized when she included it on her multiple Grammy-winning "Nick of Time" album in 1989. The Illinois native, who will receive a lifetime achievement award for songwriting this week at the Americana Music Assn. conference in Nashville and also will be inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in October, recently took time out to discuss the emotionally rich songs that have become a hallmark of his body of work over lunch in L.A., where he worked in the 1980s.
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
With pop music deep into an era of production-laden hits, it's reassuring to be reminded that the creation of great music really doesn't require anything more than a pen, a guitar and somebody who knows what to do with both.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2002 | ROGER MOORE, ORLANDO SENTINEL
Singer-songwriter John Hiatt has written hits for Bonnie Raitt, Jeff Healy, Eric Clapton, Suzy Bogguss and B.B. King. Bob Dylan covered one of his tunes. "The Thing Called Love" wasn't just a hit, it was also the title of a country music movie starring River Phoenix. And he's conjured memorable semi-autobiographical lyrics, often dealing with his past problems with alcohol.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN
John Hiatt's had his songs recorded by Bonnie Raitt and B.B. King. But he's never had anything sung by bears. Until recently, that is.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2001 | DEBORAH BARNES, Deborah Barnes is a freelance writer based in Nashville
Big East Fork Road is a narrow ribbon of pavement that winds among uniformly rounded hills in a rural area southwest of the city called Leiper's Fork. The tree-covered hills along this remote and scenic route back up to generations-old farmhouses and pastures. A playful creek skips along one side of the road, then crosses under and scurries out of sight, only to appear again several hundred yards later on the other side.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2002 | ROGER MOORE, ORLANDO SENTINEL
Singer-songwriter John Hiatt has written hits for Bonnie Raitt, Jeff Healy, Eric Clapton, Suzy Bogguss and B.B. King. Bob Dylan covered one of his tunes. "The Thing Called Love" wasn't just a hit, it was also the title of a country music movie starring River Phoenix. And he's conjured memorable semi-autobiographical lyrics, often dealing with his past problems with alcohol.
NEWS
November 4, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a recent gig in Santa Barbara, Lenny Kravitz started about 40 minutes late, and, both before and after the performance, tried to inflict $23 T-shirts on an unsuspecting public. Isn't that about enough to have Mother Teresa and her dream date, Father Time, reaching for those brass knuckles along with those backstage passes? Well, we'll have none of that at the venerable Ventura Theatre Wednesday night, according to headliner John Hiatt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hiatt is bracing for it--the onslaught from fans nervously asking, "Is everything OK at home, John?" after they hear the singer-songwriter's often wrenching tales of dead or dying relationships on his new album, "Crossing Muddy Waters." He's prepared for that reaction because it's the same one he had when he first listened to the end result of four whirlwind days of recording earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2000 | (Randy Lewis)
John Hiatt, "Crossing Muddy Waters," Vanguard. This acoustic outing letting loose Hiatt's country, folk and blues leanings isn't a radical stylistic departure. It may, however, be his most thoroughly engrossing batch of songs since his prime late-'80s work.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|