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John Hinckley

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NATIONAL
January 22, 2012 | By Yvonne D. Hawkins, Tribune Newspapers
A hearing is to resume Monday in U.S. District Court in Washington to help determine whether the man who shot President Reagan in 1981 eventually could be released from the mental hospital where he has lived since 1982. The proposal by St. Elizabeths Hospital would grant John Hinckley Jr. two 17-day visits, followed by six 24-day visits to his mother's home in Kingsmill, Va. After he completes the extended, unsupervised releases, Hinckley would get a convalescence leave. Hinckley's lawyers and treatment team envision his completing all eight releases within eight to 10 months, with the convalescence leave immediately afterward.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The man who shot Ronald Reagan and three other men in 1981 has been behaving normally when he leaves the mental hospital in Washington, D.C., where he is being treated, according to Secret Service observations in newly released court documents. John Hinckley Jr., 57, shops at Wal-Mart, Target and PetSmart during visits to his mother's home in Williamsburg, Va. One of his first stops is often a Wendy's. At home with his mother, he performs lots of chores, plays guitar and makes art. He shows few of the symptoms that led to the 1982 finding that he was insane, and therefore not guilty of attempted murder and other charges in the assassination attempt.
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NATIONAL
February 25, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
John Hinckley, the man who shot and wounded President Reagan, should be allowed to spend more time with family in Virginia instead of in a psychiatric hospital, his lawyer argued Monday. The argument by attorney Barry Levine came on the first of what could be three days of a hearing before Judge Paul L. Friedman. The jurist will rule on the plan for the number and length of visits Hinckley will be allowed with his family. Hinckley, 57, shot Reagan in March 1981 as part of the would-be assassin's fantasy of impressing actress Jodie Foster and his fascination with the movie “Taxi Driver.” Hinckley was eventually found not guilty by reason of insanity and was confined at Washington's St. Elizabeth's Hospital.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
John Hinckley, the man who shot and wounded President Reagan, should be allowed to spend more time with family in Virginia instead of in a psychiatric hospital, his lawyer argued Monday. The argument by attorney Barry Levine came on the first of what could be three days of a hearing before Judge Paul L. Friedman. The jurist will rule on the plan for the number and length of visits Hinckley will be allowed with his family. Hinckley, 57, shot Reagan in March 1981 as part of the would-be assassin's fantasy of impressing actress Jodie Foster and his fascination with the movie “Taxi Driver.” Hinckley was eventually found not guilty by reason of insanity and was confined at Washington's St. Elizabeth's Hospital.
NATIONAL
November 30, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
John Hinckley Jr., who shot President Reagan more than 30 years ago, is pushing to spend more time outside of his Washington psychiatric facility in hopes of eventually being allowed to live near his mother. His campaign has landed in federal court, with Wednesday marking the first day of proceedings before Judge Paul L. Friedman of the District Court for the District of Columbia. Hinckley's attorney, Barry Levine, argued that the gunman, now 56, had shed his violent behavior.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | Roger Simon
Of all the things that John Hinckley has been accused of--and shooting the President tops the list--none is worse than what he was accused of last week. "He sees himself as a famous person," Raymond F. Patterson, a forensic psychiatrist, told a federal judge. Hinckley, who shot President Reagan and three others in March, 1981, has petitioned a federal court to let him talk to reporters. But his psychiatrists are opposing it.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John W. Hinckley Jr. was tried a dozen years ago for his attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan, federal prosecutors felt their case against the gunman was a sure winner. Hinckley's lawyers mounted a defense of "not guilty by reason of insanity." But prosecutors presented evidence that Hinckley had known right from wrong, including testimony from government psychiatrists that he realized the illegality of his act and had expected the Secret Service to kill him on the spot.
NEWS
October 5, 1989
In "Protecting John Hinckley's Right to Talk to Barbara Walters," (by Roger Simon, Oct. 1), Simon starts by comparing Hinckley to such notorious convicted felons as Willie Horton, Charles Manson and John Wayne Gacy, and asserts that they are permitted to give interviews. Then he turns around and points out that Hinckley is not a convicted felon and is not allowed to give interviews. Simon seems to overlook the fact that John Hinckley is a psychiatric patient in a psychiatric hospital.
NEWS
April 3, 1986 | Associated Press
The parents of would-be presidential assassin John Hinckley were honored Wednesday for their efforts to educate the public about mental illness. Jack and Jo Ann Hinckley were given the Howard Safar Memorial Award for distinguished service during opening ceremonies at the annual meeting of the National Council of Community Mental Health Centers.
NEWS
March 30, 1987
Sarah Brady, the wife of White House Press Secretary James S. Brady, is marking the sixth anniversary of the shooting of President Reagan and her husband with an appeal for tougher U.S. handgun laws. "If our country had a law, favored by police to require a waiting period and background check for those purchasing handguns, John Hinckley would have been stopped," she said in a statement.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2012 | By Yvonne D. Hawkins, Tribune Newspapers
A hearing is to resume Monday in U.S. District Court in Washington to help determine whether the man who shot President Reagan in 1981 eventually could be released from the mental hospital where he has lived since 1982. The proposal by St. Elizabeths Hospital would grant John Hinckley Jr. two 17-day visits, followed by six 24-day visits to his mother's home in Kingsmill, Va. After he completes the extended, unsupervised releases, Hinckley would get a convalescence leave. Hinckley's lawyers and treatment team envision his completing all eight releases within eight to 10 months, with the convalescence leave immediately afterward.
OPINION
December 13, 2011
We wouldn't presume to say whether John W. Hinckley Jr., who attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan in 1981, should be allowed to spend more time outside the mental hospital where he has been confined for much of the last three decades. Hinckley has not committed any acts of violence on his furloughs from St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington. On the other hand, according to a detailed report in the Washington Post, he has engaged in questionable behavior. But on one question we do have an opinion: Hinckley should be treated by a federal judge the same way any other patient in his position would be. Under the hospital's proposals, Hinckley would be able to visit his mother in Williamsburg, Va., twice for 17 days and six times for 24 days each year.
NATIONAL
November 30, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
John Hinckley Jr., who shot President Reagan more than 30 years ago, is pushing to spend more time outside of his Washington psychiatric facility in hopes of eventually being allowed to live near his mother. His campaign has landed in federal court, with Wednesday marking the first day of proceedings before Judge Paul L. Friedman of the District Court for the District of Columbia. Hinckley's attorney, Barry Levine, argued that the gunman, now 56, had shed his violent behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vincent J. Fuller, a leading Washington lawyer who successfully defended would-be presidential assassin John W. Hinckley Jr., has died. He was 75. Fuller, who lived in Bethesda, Md., died Wednesday of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a suburban Maryland hospice. The lawyer defended a wide range of notable figures, including boxer Mike Tyson, boxing promoter Don King and financier Michael Milken.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Wednesday denied a request from presidential assailant John Hinckley Jr. to spend several days at a time away from a mental hospital. But U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman said the man who shot President Reagan can continue making shorter, overnight visits with his parents without supervision, despite objections from prosecutors who wanted those visits stopped.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2003 | Faye Fiore and Shweta Govindarajan, Times Staff Writers
A federal judge heard testimony Monday asking that John W. Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to assassinate President Reagan, be permitted to leave the psychiatric hospital where he has been held for 21 years for unsupervised visits with his parents. "The unanimous opinion of the experts is that he's not dangerous," attorney Barry Levine told U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman, arguing that Hinckley's mental illness is largely in remission.
NEWS
April 20, 1987 | United Press International
The judge who has been with John W. Hinckley Jr.'s case since Hinckley was arrested for shooting President Reagan and three others said Sunday that he would consider releasing Hinckley at some time. But the prosecutor in the case, U.S. Atty. Joseph diGenova, said he doubts that Hinckley should ever be released. DiGenova and U.S. District Judge Barrington D. Parker appeared on CBS' "Face the Nation."
NATIONAL
November 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Wednesday denied a request from presidential assailant John Hinckley Jr. to spend several days at a time away from a mental hospital. But U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman said the man who shot President Reagan can continue making shorter, overnight visits with his parents without supervision, despite objections from prosecutors who wanted those visits stopped.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John W. Hinckley Jr. was tried a dozen years ago for his attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan, federal prosecutors felt their case against the gunman was a sure winner. Hinckley's lawyers mounted a defense of "not guilty by reason of insanity." But prosecutors presented evidence that Hinckley had known right from wrong, including testimony from government psychiatrists that he realized the illegality of his act and had expected the Secret Service to kill him on the spot.
NEWS
June 9, 1993
Barrington Parker, 77, District Court judge who presided over the 1982 trial of presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. Appointed to the federal bench by President Richard Nixon in 1969, Parker later barred the Nixon Administration from establishing price controls in 1973.
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