Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Hockenberry
IN THE NEWS

John Hockenberry

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
July 9, 1995 | John Balzar, John Balzar is the Times' bureau chief in Nairobi
Some things we don't ask. Like of the paraplegic in his wheelchair: How's your sex life? John Hockenberry's is. . . . No, no. Let him tell you. A broadcast journalist formerly with NPR and now with ABC, Hockenberry wrote this travelogue, autobiography, confessional, cathartic and reproof after spending exactly half of his 38 years as a T-5 paraplegic, numb from mid-chest down, a "crip," sitting in a wheelchair. But hardly sitting still. Hockenberry is a peripatetic paraplegic.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
July 9, 1995 | John Balzar, John Balzar is the Times' bureau chief in Nairobi
Some things we don't ask. Like of the paraplegic in his wheelchair: How's your sex life? John Hockenberry's is. . . . No, no. Let him tell you. A broadcast journalist formerly with NPR and now with ABC, Hockenberry wrote this travelogue, autobiography, confessional, cathartic and reproof after spending exactly half of his 38 years as a T-5 paraplegic, numb from mid-chest down, a "crip," sitting in a wheelchair. But hardly sitting still. Hockenberry is a peripatetic paraplegic.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Covering the Palestinian uprising from a wheelchair, in hilly towns with bumpy alleyways or in cramped refugee camps with sand for streets, was a daunting prospect for radio reporter John Hockenberry, although every once in a while his disability brought a minor advantage. Sometimes, for instance, Israeli soldiers on guard against intrusive reporters just didn't bother stopping a guy in a wheelchair. "It's shocking how invisible someone in a wheelchair can be.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after half a lifetime in a wheelchair, ABC-TV correspondent John Hockenberry says he has this recurring dream. He is sitting in the chair in his kitchen and sees something he wants on a counter. "And you get up and sort of limp over and grab it, and limp back to the chair. And think to yourself, before you wake up, 'I should do that more. I'm not going to do that at all if I don't practice that a little more.' And you lie in bed [thinking], 'Is that right? Can I walk a little?'
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after half a lifetime in a wheelchair, ABC-TV correspondent John Hockenberry says he has this recurring dream. He is sitting in the chair in his kitchen and sees something he wants on a counter. "And you get up and sort of limp over and grab it, and limp back to the chair. And think to yourself, before you wake up, 'I should do that more. I'm not going to do that at all if I don't practice that a little more.' And you lie in bed [thinking], 'Is that right? Can I walk a little?'
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1992
"The fact that (National Public Radio correspondent John Hockenberry) is in a wheelchair made us ask, 'Can he do the job?' I asked around. When I heard about him being dragged across Turkey on a camel, I figured the guy could get from one place to another reasonably efficiently. The real issue is what you do when you get there. What he does is very exciting. Nothing gets in John's way, as far as I know." --Tom Yellin, executive producer, ABC News, in the Washington Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990
I was distressed to see the use of the term wheelchair bound in the subheading of Daniel Williams' Jan. 16 article on John Hockenberry ("A Very Able Disabled Reporter"). It is inaccurate. I know of no one who uses a wheelchair who doesn't get out of it at one time or another, if only to sleep. Without a wheelchair for mobility a person truly could be "bound." Many newspapers have amended their stylebooks in recent years and no longer recommend the use of wheelchair bound to describe a person who uses a wheelchair for mobility.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993
ABC-TV, which already has lured Cokie Roberts and John Hockenberry away from National Public Radio, now has hired NPR correspondent Deborah Wang to work in its Beijing bureau. Wang, who has been covering Asia for the public-radio network since 1989, has previous TV experience, having worked at WGBH-TV in Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1998
A benefit matinee performance of "Bring In 'Da Noise, Bring In 'Da Funk," the hit Broadway musical, will be presented at the Ahmanson Theatre on March 7, with proceeds going to Center Theatre Group's multicultural playwriting programs. Gregory Hines is honorary event chair; other honorary chairs are Jimmy Smits, Wanda De Jesus, Charlayne Woodard, Lauren Tom and John Hockenberry. Admission includes a post-show party and entertainment at the theater. Tickets are $125. Information: (213) 972-7660.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Awards to Disabled: The 12th Annual Media Access Awards honoring TV, film and radio programs that "accurately and positively" portray people with disabilities will be presented tonight at Universal Studios. TV series contenders are "Knot's Landing," "Wiseguy" and "The Young and the Restless" (CBS) and "Twin Peaks" and "Life Goes On" (ABC). Top film nominees are "Born on the Fourth of July" "Cinema Paradiso" and "My Left Foot."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1992
"The fact that (National Public Radio correspondent John Hockenberry) is in a wheelchair made us ask, 'Can he do the job?' I asked around. When I heard about him being dragged across Turkey on a camel, I figured the guy could get from one place to another reasonably efficiently. The real issue is what you do when you get there. What he does is very exciting. Nothing gets in John's way, as far as I know." --Tom Yellin, executive producer, ABC News, in the Washington Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990
I was distressed to see the use of the term wheelchair bound in the subheading of Daniel Williams' Jan. 16 article on John Hockenberry ("A Very Able Disabled Reporter"). It is inaccurate. I know of no one who uses a wheelchair who doesn't get out of it at one time or another, if only to sleep. Without a wheelchair for mobility a person truly could be "bound." Many newspapers have amended their stylebooks in recent years and no longer recommend the use of wheelchair bound to describe a person who uses a wheelchair for mobility.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Covering the Palestinian uprising from a wheelchair, in hilly towns with bumpy alleyways or in cramped refugee camps with sand for streets, was a daunting prospect for radio reporter John Hockenberry, although every once in a while his disability brought a minor advantage. Sometimes, for instance, Israeli soldiers on guard against intrusive reporters just didn't bother stopping a guy in a wheelchair. "It's shocking how invisible someone in a wheelchair can be.
BOOKS
July 30, 1995
Thank you for John Balzar's understanding and insightful review of John Hockenberry's "Moving Violations" on the cover of today's Book Review section. But as a long-time wheelchair user myself, I was somewhat put off by the review's title, "A Minority of One." Fact is, the U.S. government estimates some 49 million Americans have a disability--making us the single largest minority group in the country! Ironically, Balzar astutely points out: "Hockenberry tells an intimate, personal story about a minority group for which each of us remains fully eligible."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|