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John Hodge

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NEWS
June 4, 1996 | From staff and wire reports
Fire swept through a 65-year-old rural black church in Greensboro, the fifth such blaze in western Alabama since December. Damage to Rising Star Baptist Church could total $250,000, deacon John Hodge said. Investigators were expected to release preliminary findings today on whether the fire was deliberately set. No cause was found for fires in Greene County that destroyed one church in late December and two more within hours of each other in January.
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NATIONAL
September 28, 2012 | By Tina Susman
A man shot and killed a masked intruder apparently trying to break into his sister's home in suburban Connecticut, only to discover the suspected burglar was his own 15-year-old son, police said. It was not clear why the teenager, Tyler Giuliano, was lurking outside his aunt's home at about 1 a.m. Thursday dressed all in black and wearing a ski mask. Police say the aunt, who was home alone, called her brother -- Tyler's father, Jeffrey Giuliano -- who lives next door. The elder Giuliano rushed from his home with a loaded gun and opened fire on the masked individual, who confronted him with what appeared to be a weapon in his hand, according to police.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By David Ng
An intimate, two-hander play by a relatively unknown writer took home the top prize at this year's London Evening Standard Theatre Awards. "Constellations," by Nick Payne, won the prize for best play on Sunday, beating out works by Caryl Churchill and James Graham. "Constellations" ran at the Royal Court Upstairs earlier this year and starred Sally Hawkins and Rafe Spall. The play -- a cryptic, science-themed romance that runs a brief 70 minutes -- received mostly positive reviews.
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | Associated Press
NASA on Wednesday unveiled a new blueprint for the $8-billion manned space station it plans to assemble in orbit in the 1990s with help from Japan, Europe and Canada. The model is a scaled-down version of a larger facility envisioned earlier, and it is designed so a permanent crew does not have to be on board from the beginning, which had been a feature of the earlier plan.
NEWS
March 24, 1997 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: Saturday's Independent Spirit Awards in a white tent erected on a Santa Monica beach parking lot, followed by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts annual tea party at the nearby Shutters hotel. The ISA honors indie filmmakers; BAFTA salutes Anglo and American Oscar nominees. The key difference is the indies have better T-shirts, the Brits have better hamts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999
Here we go again. Patrick Goldstein's "The New New Wave" piece last Sunday is another contribution to that stubbornly persistent myth that directors are the authors of the films they direct. Let me pass over Goldstein's relegation of Mssrs. Scorsese, Pollack, Reiner (Rob) et al to the slag heap in his rush to praise the new wave. That's the subject of another letter. It is his claim that these "New New Wave directors" are "storytellers" that is both absurd and insulting to the people who are, in fact, the storytellers--the screenwriters who write the scripts that these so-called "storytellers" film.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Shallow Grave" confirms what many of us have long suspected: Living with roommates can make you murderous. The movie is a nasty little joke but, by the time it ends, you may feel like the joke is on you. It's a black comedy that gets progressively blacker--and redder. David (Christopher Eccleston), Juliet (Kerry Fox) and Alex (Ewan McGregor), who share a cavernous apartment in central Scotland, are looking for a roommate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The crippling search for perfection can affect anyone, a traveler looking for a dreamy retreat from modern life or an actor searching for exactly the right role. In "The Beach," it afflicts both at the same time. For Leonardo DiCaprio, as for Richard, the American vagabond in Thailand he plays, dealing with paradise is a tricky dilemma.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Be careful what you wish for, you might get it. And it might turn out to be "A Life Less Ordinary." The latest effort from the crew that made "Trainspotting" so exciting--writer John Hodge, director Danny Boyle, producer Andrew Macdonald and star Ewan McGregor--"A Life Less Ordinary" sounds like everything audiences weary of business-as-usual major studio romances would be happy to embrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
If there's a lesson to be learned from the fantasy adventure "The Seeker," it's that when Ian McShane tells you not to do something, you really should listen. In this dreary, spectacle-driven adaptation of "The Dark Is Rising," the second novel in Susan Cooper's award-winning fantasy series for young adults, the stentorian-voiced English actor, late of "Deadwood" fame, plays Merriman Lyon.
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