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John Hope Franklin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2009 | Associated Press
John Hope Franklin, a Duke University historian and scholar of life in the South and the African American experience in the United States, died Wednesday. He was 94. Duke spokesman David Jarmul said Franklin died of congestive heart failure at the university's hospital in Durham, N.C. As an author, his book "From Slavery to Freedom" was a landmark integration of black history into American history. As a scholar, his research helped Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP legal defense team win Brown vs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 17, 2009
Re "Obama lifts all limits on relatives' Cuba visits," April 14 I thought the Supreme Court's decision in Brown vs. Board of Education determined that separate is not equal -- yet the Obama administration orders that some American citizens can visit Cuba whenever they wish and spend whatever money they wish to while there, but the rest of us will continue to be treated as unsophisticated children who may be beguiled by all the evil boogeymen in...
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OPINION
July 2, 1995 | Gayle Pollard Terry, Gayle Pollard Terry is an editorial writer for The Times
Historian John Hope Franklin, now 80, remembers no Fourth of July fireworks, barbecues or parades during his childhood in Oklahoma. His family celebrated a different holiday: the anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1. "There was always a meeting," he remembers. "The Proclamation would be read and somebody would make a speech." In 1927, young Franklin made the speech, which had been written by his father, a lawyer. He was 12, and it was his first public address.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2009 | Associated Press
John Hope Franklin, a Duke University historian and scholar of life in the South and the African American experience in the United States, died Wednesday. He was 94. Duke spokesman David Jarmul said Franklin died of congestive heart failure at the university's hospital in Durham, N.C. As an author, his book "From Slavery to Freedom" was a landmark integration of black history into American history. As a scholar, his research helped Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP legal defense team win Brown vs.
NEWS
August 17, 1997 | PAUL HENDRICKSON, THE WASHINGTON POST
When World War II broke out, and the look of America was changing overnight to khaki, a young college teacher and scholar named John Hope Franklin went to see a Navy recruiter. "What can you do?" said the recruiter. The teacher and scholar thought about that. "Well, I have four gold medals in typing," he said. "I can run an office. I have a PhD in history from Harvard." "Well, you have everything but color, then," said the recruiter. He didn't say "the right color," nor did he need to.
NEWS
March 17, 1991
The March 3 article "Elder Statesmen" by Yemi Toure is reporting par excellence. Reading about the lives and works of five black race-conscious and scholarship-oriented authors--John Henrik Clarke, John G. Jackson, Chancellor Williams, Yusef ben-Jochannan and John Hope Franklin--brought satisfaction to my heart. It is unfortunate that only a small segment of the black population and an even smaller number of white people are aware of contributions these elder statesmen have made toward reclaiming authentic black history.
OPINION
April 17, 2009
Re "Obama lifts all limits on relatives' Cuba visits," April 14 I thought the Supreme Court's decision in Brown vs. Board of Education determined that separate is not equal -- yet the Obama administration orders that some American citizens can visit Cuba whenever they wish and spend whatever money they wish to while there, but the rest of us will continue to be treated as unsophisticated children who may be beguiled by all the evil boogeymen in...
NEWS
September 12, 1997
Re: "He Served America Anyway" (Aug. 17) on the career of the distinguished historian John Hope Franklin: The article did not mention Franklin's contribution to the teaching of history to the children of America. In 1965, Franklin co-authored, with UCLA history professor John W. Caughey and Harvard history professor Ernest R. May (Caughey's son-in-law) a textbook for junior high school history courses. It was titled "Land of the Free" and aroused a controversy. Critics condemned it as being under communist influence for being too critical of American history, for saying things no other textbooks said.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | YEMI TOURE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 8:30 on a Friday evening at the carpeted, cozy Eso Won bookstore in South-Central Los Angeles. But the body clock of Henrik Clarke, 76, who had just flown in from New York for a book-signing party in his honor, said it was already 11:30 p.m., his normal bedtime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1991
There are three issues that need addressing in Shelby Steele's commentary on Judge Clarence Thomas' nomination for the Supreme Court (Commentary, Aug. 11). -- When Steele implies from black historian John Hope Franklin's statement, "Self-help is admirable so long as it encourages initiative and achievement in a society that gives all its members an opportunity to develop in a manner best-suited to their talents," that "self-help can only work after redress," he is missing a deeper point.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | Bob Thompson, Washington Post
Tell John Hope Franklin that he's the Rosa Parks of historians, and he lets out a long, astonished laugh. "Please," he says. OK, we won't push him on that right now. But the comparison is not as silly as he makes it sound. Franklin was in Washington recently to talk about his newly published autobiography, "Mirror to America." Now an emeritus professor at Duke, he's a handsome, white-haired man in a gray suit whose upright bearing makes him seem far younger than his 90 years.
BOOKS
July 4, 1999 | IRA BERLIN, Ira Berlin is the author of "Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America."
The current collapse of affirmative action and the resegregation of American society has led the American people back to first causes: the nearly three centuries of slavery that shaped American race relations.
NEWS
September 12, 1997
Re: "He Served America Anyway" (Aug. 17) on the career of the distinguished historian John Hope Franklin: The article did not mention Franklin's contribution to the teaching of history to the children of America. In 1965, Franklin co-authored, with UCLA history professor John W. Caughey and Harvard history professor Ernest R. May (Caughey's son-in-law) a textbook for junior high school history courses. It was titled "Land of the Free" and aroused a controversy. Critics condemned it as being under communist influence for being too critical of American history, for saying things no other textbooks said.
NEWS
August 17, 1997 | PAUL HENDRICKSON, THE WASHINGTON POST
When World War II broke out, and the look of America was changing overnight to khaki, a young college teacher and scholar named John Hope Franklin went to see a Navy recruiter. "What can you do?" said the recruiter. The teacher and scholar thought about that. "Well, I have four gold medals in typing," he said. "I can run an office. I have a PhD in history from Harvard." "Well, you have everything but color, then," said the recruiter. He didn't say "the right color," nor did he need to.
OPINION
July 2, 1995 | Gayle Pollard Terry, Gayle Pollard Terry is an editorial writer for The Times
Historian John Hope Franklin, now 80, remembers no Fourth of July fireworks, barbecues or parades during his childhood in Oklahoma. His family celebrated a different holiday: the anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1. "There was always a meeting," he remembers. "The Proclamation would be read and somebody would make a speech." In 1927, young Franklin made the speech, which had been written by his father, a lawyer. He was 12, and it was his first public address.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1991
There are three issues that need addressing in Shelby Steele's commentary on Judge Clarence Thomas' nomination for the Supreme Court (Commentary, Aug. 11). -- When Steele implies from black historian John Hope Franklin's statement, "Self-help is admirable so long as it encourages initiative and achievement in a society that gives all its members an opportunity to develop in a manner best-suited to their talents," that "self-help can only work after redress," he is missing a deeper point.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | Bob Thompson, Washington Post
Tell John Hope Franklin that he's the Rosa Parks of historians, and he lets out a long, astonished laugh. "Please," he says. OK, we won't push him on that right now. But the comparison is not as silly as he makes it sound. Franklin was in Washington recently to talk about his newly published autobiography, "Mirror to America." Now an emeritus professor at Duke, he's a handsome, white-haired man in a gray suit whose upright bearing makes him seem far younger than his 90 years.
BOOKS
July 4, 1999 | IRA BERLIN, Ira Berlin is the author of "Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America."
The current collapse of affirmative action and the resegregation of American society has led the American people back to first causes: the nearly three centuries of slavery that shaped American race relations.
NEWS
March 17, 1991
The March 3 article "Elder Statesmen" by Yemi Toure is reporting par excellence. Reading about the lives and works of five black race-conscious and scholarship-oriented authors--John Henrik Clarke, John G. Jackson, Chancellor Williams, Yusef ben-Jochannan and John Hope Franklin--brought satisfaction to my heart. It is unfortunate that only a small segment of the black population and an even smaller number of white people are aware of contributions these elder statesmen have made toward reclaiming authentic black history.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | YEMI TOURE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 8:30 on a Friday evening at the carpeted, cozy Eso Won bookstore in South-Central Los Angeles. But the body clock of Henrik Clarke, 76, who had just flown in from New York for a book-signing party in his honor, said it was already 11:30 p.m., his normal bedtime.
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