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NEWS
February 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Johns Hopkins University President Steven Muller, one of the nation's longest-serving university presidents, has announced that he will resign on June 30, 1990. Muller, 61, who has been president of the university for 17 years, did not say Wednesday what he will do after he resigns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2013
Jozef Glemp Polish cardinal Cardinal Jozef Glemp, 83, the head of Poland's influential Roman Catholic church from 1981 to 2004 - a time when it played a historic role in the fight against communism - died Wednesday in Warsaw. Jozef Kloch, a church spokesman, said in a statement that Glemp had been ill for many years, and the Polish news agency PAP said he had lung cancer. Glemp oversaw the church at a critical time in its history and that of Poland. He was the primate for most of the papacy of the Polish-born Pope John Paul II, who was elected pope in 1979.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2007 | Tod Goldberg, Special to The Times
IT'S been 20 years since Max Apple's last work of fiction and more than a decade since his memoir of life with his grandfather, "Roommates," became a national hit, spawning the movie of the same name starring Peter Falk. In the intervening years, Apple has kept a relatively low profile; his short fiction periodically shows up in magazines and journals, and he teaches writing at the University of Pennsylvania.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan
Philip D. Curtin, a historian of the African slave trade who after World War II was a leading figure in reviving the neglected field of African history, has died. He was 87. Curtin, who was awarded a MacArthur Foundation grant in 1983, died June 4 of pneumonia at Chester County Hospital in West Chester, Pa.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2003 | Nick Owchar, Times Staff Writer
Look at Rembrandt's 1654 painting, "Bathsheba at Her Bath," and you quickly understand why the Dutch painter was a master of light and shadow. King David's concubine, in all her ample, naked glory, sits in a warm, coppery light. All else, including the servant who carefully wipes between her toes, is lost in murk and shadow. Of course that must have been the painter's intent: It is impossible, as it was for David, to keep one's eyes off the voluptuous body of this woman. But T.C.
BOOKS
January 31, 1988 | ELENA BRUNET
From the political maelstrom that is the Middle East, R. K. Ramazani, professor of government and foreign affairs at the University of Virginia, builds a lucid, reasoned--if controversial--analysis of the revolution in Iran and the response in surrounding nations as well as in the United States.
HEALTH
August 13, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN
Let's face it. We're all aging, and many of us are going to live long enough to spend our last years in nursing homes. We hope we'll be tended by compassionate caregivers who have only our best and individual interests at heart, but given the nightmarish stories we hear about some nursing homes, it's important to become familiar with an environment in which our parents, our spouses, our partners or ourselves eventually may live.
BOOKS
February 11, 2007 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of many books, including "Elia Kazan: A Biography" and, most recently, with George Perry and Stephen Bogart, "Bogie: A Celebration of the Life and Films of Humphrey Bogart."
FILM noir remains a genre in search of its roots -- and perhaps even a proper definition. That's because, unlike other genres (westerns, musicals, romantic comedies), it was not identified as one until dozens, perhaps hundreds, of movies in the noir vein had been made. In the 1940s, no one in Hollywood -- asked what he or she was currently doing -- would have replied, "Oh, you know, a nice little noir over at Warner Bros."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2013
Jozef Glemp Polish cardinal Cardinal Jozef Glemp, 83, the head of Poland's influential Roman Catholic church from 1981 to 2004 - a time when it played a historic role in the fight against communism - died Wednesday in Warsaw. Jozef Kloch, a church spokesman, said in a statement that Glemp had been ill for many years, and the Polish news agency PAP said he had lung cancer. Glemp oversaw the church at a critical time in its history and that of Poland. He was the primate for most of the papacy of the Polish-born Pope John Paul II, who was elected pope in 1979.
BOOKS
April 10, 1988 | Michael Harris, Harris is a copy editor on the suburban desk.
Imagine a boy lying on a Midwestern lawn, looking up through the slats of a picket fence. There are spaces between the boards. Through the spaces, he can see things move. Cars and trains, which sometimes crash. The forest of adults' legs, and the spaces between them. Sometimes it's the fence that seems to move and the things behind it that stand still, recurrent as danger, symbolic as the sky. Reading Michael Martone's short stories is like that.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2007 | Tod Goldberg, Special to The Times
IT'S been 20 years since Max Apple's last work of fiction and more than a decade since his memoir of life with his grandfather, "Roommates," became a national hit, spawning the movie of the same name starring Peter Falk. In the intervening years, Apple has kept a relatively low profile; his short fiction periodically shows up in magazines and journals, and he teaches writing at the University of Pennsylvania.
BOOKS
February 11, 2007 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of many books, including "Elia Kazan: A Biography" and, most recently, with George Perry and Stephen Bogart, "Bogie: A Celebration of the Life and Films of Humphrey Bogart."
FILM noir remains a genre in search of its roots -- and perhaps even a proper definition. That's because, unlike other genres (westerns, musicals, romantic comedies), it was not identified as one until dozens, perhaps hundreds, of movies in the noir vein had been made. In the 1940s, no one in Hollywood -- asked what he or she was currently doing -- would have replied, "Oh, you know, a nice little noir over at Warner Bros."
BOOKS
August 3, 2003 | Robert Del Tredici, Robert Del Tredici, author of "At Work in the Fields of the Bomb" and founder of the Atomic Photographers Guild, is a documentary photographer specializing in nuclear weapons.
There was a time not long ago when we pitted our brains against the Bomb. In the 1980s, antiwar activist Helen Caldecott compelled us to watch while she opened the gates of hell over our cities; Jonathan Schell broke the world's heart in "The Fate of the Earth," with his depiction of a full-scale nuclear exchange and its aftermath of nuclear winter and human extinction; and psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton pondered parallels between Nazi and nuclear genocidal mentalities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2003 | Nick Owchar, Times Staff Writer
Look at Rembrandt's 1654 painting, "Bathsheba at Her Bath," and you quickly understand why the Dutch painter was a master of light and shadow. King David's concubine, in all her ample, naked glory, sits in a warm, coppery light. All else, including the servant who carefully wipes between her toes, is lost in murk and shadow. Of course that must have been the painter's intent: It is impossible, as it was for David, to keep one's eyes off the voluptuous body of this woman. But T.C.
BOOKS
June 23, 2002 | ROBERT S. BOYNTON, Robert S. Boynton directs the graduate magazine journalism program at New York University.
Anyone who fears that 25 years of postmodern relativism has pickled the brains of today's youth has never taught introductory journalism. On the first day of class when I greet my students (whether graduate or undergraduate), the only thing I can be sure they believe in is the absolute distinction between "facts" and "values"--the latter having a corrupting effect on the former, which is the sole terrain of "objective" journalism. "It's all relative" isn't a phrase I hear very often.
BOOKS
June 16, 2002 | ABRAHAM VERGHESE, Abraham Verghese is a physician, writer and the author, most recently, of "The Tennis Partner."
In its end stages, Parkinson's disease can reduce its victims to a frozen, rigid, mute, unblinking, locked-in state. In writing about their struggles with this disease, Joel Havemann and Michael J. Fox display the opposite qualities: nimbleness, great passion, hyper-alertness and an awareness of what is meaningful in life--as if the disease has blessed them with special vision and a unique voice.
BOOKS
May 26, 2002 | DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, Douglas Brinkley is professor of history and director of the Eisenhower Center for American Studies at the University of New Orleans.
It's hard to know where to pin the blame. Although Herman Melville had proudly titled his new novel "Moby-Dick," the British publishers, for marketing reasons and without his knowledge, changed it in November 1851 to "The Whale." Worse, when Melville shipped the manuscript across the Atlantic Ocean, the last page got so smushed that it was never printed.
BOOKS
January 1, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
During the 1830s, mustard plasters and foot baths, blood letting, "spicy and emetic botanicals . . . and enemas laced with cayenne pepper" were the preferred health remedies. In the early 20th Century, Howard Fletcher recommended chewing food so thoroughly "that all flavor was extracted and the remains involuntarily swallowed"--for "efficient" digestion.
BOOKS
May 26, 2002 | DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, Douglas Brinkley is professor of history and director of the Eisenhower Center for American Studies at the University of New Orleans.
It's hard to know where to pin the blame. Although Herman Melville had proudly titled his new novel "Moby-Dick," the British publishers, for marketing reasons and without his knowledge, changed it in November 1851 to "The Whale." Worse, when Melville shipped the manuscript across the Atlantic Ocean, the last page got so smushed that it was never printed.
HEALTH
August 13, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN
Let's face it. We're all aging, and many of us are going to live long enough to spend our last years in nursing homes. We hope we'll be tended by compassionate caregivers who have only our best and individual interests at heart, but given the nightmarish stories we hear about some nursing homes, it's important to become familiar with an environment in which our parents, our spouses, our partners or ourselves eventually may live.
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