Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Horan
IN THE NEWS

John Horan

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 11, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Make no mistake about it: L.A. Gear doesn't like being called "L.A. Rear." And it hates being called "L.A. Disappear." Those unflattering nicknames were cited in a libel suit that L.A. Gear filed Wednesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court against the publishers of the newsletter Sporting Goods Intelligence and its editor, John Horan. The suit accuses the defendants of damaging L.A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 11, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Make no mistake about it: L.A. Gear doesn't like being called "L.A. Rear." And it hates being called "L.A. Disappear." Those unflattering nicknames were cited in a libel suit that L.A. Gear filed Wednesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court against the publishers of the newsletter Sporting Goods Intelligence and its editor, John Horan. The suit accuses the defendants of damaging L.A.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
L.A. Gear, the high-flying maker of trendy athletic footwear, has hot-footed it past Converse to become the nation's third-best-selling athletic shoe brand, behind Nike and Reebok. For the six months ended May 31, the company, with offices in Marina del Rey, has said it expects to report sales of about $223 million, matching sales for all of last year. That easily would top the $175 million in sales during the same period projected for Converse, owned by Interco. L.A. Gear is "really the boss brand out there in the Valley Girl market," said John Horan, publisher of Sporting Goods Management News, a newsletter in Yardley, Pa. Nike, meanwhile, "continues to be the hottest thing in the market," Horan said, adding that he expects the company's "swoop"-adorned brand to bolt past Reebok when those companies report full-year results in mid-July.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
L.A. Gear, the high-flying maker of trendy athletic footwear, has hot-footed it past Converse to become the nation's third-best-selling athletic shoe brand, behind Nike and Reebok. For the six months ended May 31, the company, with offices in Marina del Rey, has said it expects to report sales of about $223 million, matching sales for all of last year. That easily would top the $175 million in sales during the same period projected for Converse, owned by Interco. L.A. Gear is "really the boss brand out there in the Valley Girl market," said John Horan, publisher of Sporting Goods Management News, a newsletter in Yardley, Pa. Nike, meanwhile, "continues to be the hottest thing in the market," Horan said, adding that he expects the company's "swoop"-adorned brand to bolt past Reebok when those companies report full-year results in mid-July.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1990
"I keep asking myself, what parents would want their children to wear these? Kids look like junior Hell's Angels in them." --John Horan, publisher of the trade journal Sporting Goods Intelligence, on the weak sales of L.A. Gear's much-ballyhooed line of Michael Jackson shoes.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES
L.A. Gear, a leading maker of trendy athletic footwear whose stock has been soaring for the past year in over-the-counter trading, leaped onto the Big Board on Monday. Appropriately enough, the New York Stock Exchange assigned the company the ticker symbol "LA." In its first day of trading on the exchange, the price closed at $34 a share, 62.5 cents above Friday's last over-the-counter price. More than 483,000 shares traded hands. Robert Y. Greenberg, L.A.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1986 | MARTHA GROVES
The stock price of Converse Inc., a big name in athletic shoes, soared $10 a share to $26.75 in over-the-counter trading Thursday after Interco Inc., which makes and sells Florsheim shoes, disclosed that it holds a 9.6% stake in the company and has offered to buy it. St. Louis-based Interco, which also manufactures apparel and Ethan Allen furniture, said it has bid $26 a share for Converse but is prepared to offer $28 a share if the Converse board acts quickly to approve a definitive agreement.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | Associated Press
A 68-year-old man with a bad heart and big debts held up a bank with his grandson's toy gun but was captured when he collapsed during a chase, police said Friday. Eugene Cadwalader, who allegedly spent the $100,000 he won at gambling several years ago, had run up more than $20,000 in credit card debts alone, said Lt. John Horan of the Suffolk County police robbery squad.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
Reebok International said Friday that James Barclay will relinquish his job as president of the Reebok Footwear division to take on "critical areas of business development" in his continuing role as executive vice president of the parent corporation. Barclay, 46, who helped found the U.S. version of Reebok in 1979 with Chairman Paul Fireman, 43, has not been demoted, spokesman John Gillis said.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1986 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Reebok International, which this year will surge past Nike to be the dominant force in U.S. athletic footwear, said Tuesday that it has agreed to buy Rockport Co., a Massachusetts maker of walking and casual shoes, for $118.5 million. Analysts viewed the acquisition as a big plus for Reebok, which indicated in February that it wanted to buy a well-managed consumer products company.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
C. Joseph LeBonte has resigned as president, chief operating officer and a director of Reebok International to return to the presidency of Vantage Group, a Palos Verdes-based venture capital firm. LeBonte founded the investment firm in 1983 after he resigned as president of 20th Century Fox. LeBonte, 50, joined Reebok in March, 1987. Paul Fireman, Reebok's chairman and chief executive, will assume LeBonte's titles and duties, a spokesman for the Stoughton, Mass.-based company said.
SPORTS
February 21, 1992
Josh Smaler's one-out, bases-loaded single keyed a four-run ninth-inning rally and lifted Pierce College past Santa Monica, 9-6, in a Mt. San Antonio college baseball tournament game Thursday. Paul Geller's two-run double capped the uprising and Mike Eby scattered two earned runs over nine innings to keep Pierce unbeaten in the double-elimination tournament. Eby, who struck out five, extended his scoreless-innings streak to 20 before Santa Monica scored in the third.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|