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John Hughes

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2009 | Mark Caro
The setting could have been lifted from one of his movies: a bright summer day amid beautiful houses and expansive lawns on Chicago's North Shore. But in place of boisterous laughter and iconoclastic spirit was a mood quiet and somber as family, friends and colleagues such as Matthew Broderick, Ben Stein and Vince Vaughn gathered in a Lake Forest funeral home Tuesday to remember filmmaker John Hughes. Hughes, who directed such enduring '80s teen comedies as "The Breakfast Club" and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and oversaw the 1990 box-office smash "Home Alone" while living on the North Shore, died Thursday of a heart attack in Manhattan at 59. He was remembered at an invitation-only service at Wenban Funeral Home, where security personnel checked off mourners' names at the door.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Director James Ponsoldt was 16 when he first saw Lloyd Dobler stand on Diane Court's front lawn and declare his love for the blue-eyed beauty who was both out of his class and out of his league. With the help of Peter Gabriel's lyrics and John Cusack's blaring boom box, Cameron Crowe's "Say Anything" had just rocked his world. "It changed my life when I saw it, it genuinely did," Ponsoldt said of the 1989 cult favorite. "I totally fell in love with Diane Court [Ione Skye]. I had the poster on my wall.
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NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Molly Ringwald's novel-in-stories “When It Happens To You” officially publishes Tuesday. When I talked to her about the book, the conversation often took off into interesting realms that didn't make it into the feature on her that ran in Saturday's Los Angeles Times. Here are a few bonus excerpts from that interview, edited for length and clarity. We'd begun talking informally in a nearby bookstore, where the “50 Shades of Grey” trilogy dominated the bestseller display. She told me that she had read the book because her friend, Bret Easton Ellis, was interested in writing the screenplay adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Judd Nelson thinks he got the wrong idea from working with John Hughes on the writer-director's seminal 1985 teen angst drama "The Breakfast Club. " "I thought all movies were going to be collaborative and have rehearsals and have a director who liked us," said Nelson. His smoldering performance as high school bad boy John Bender made Nelson an overnight sensation and a full-fledged member of the Brat Pack along with his "Breakfast Club" costars Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
John HUGHES hasn't set foot in Hollywood for years, but his influence has never been more potent. The king of 1980s comedy, Hughes now qualifies as something of a Howard Hughes-style recluse -- he doesn't have an agent, doesn't give interviews and lives far away, somewhere in Chicago's sprawling North Shore suburbs where most of his films were set.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2011 | By Jamie Wetherbe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The films of John Hughes can teach us a thing or two about how to survive the holidays: Unwelcome kin are best left to their RV, burglars can be thwarted with homemade booby traps, and you should always travel with John Candy. "For the Record: John Hughes (Holiday Road)," a musical production playing at Show at Barre Nov. 17-Dec. 30, is a mash-up of the soundtracks and quotable moments from Hughes' holiday classics — including "Home Alone," "Christmas Vacation" and "Planes, Trains and Automobiles" — with a dose of his '80s teen flicks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1987 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Rock stars--eat your hearts out! MCA Records' newest artist has a guaranteed five-album record deal, his own custom label (Hughes Music, where he can sign his own bands) and a hankering for a No. 1 hit. It's a pop coup that might even make Mick Jagger jealous. Who's the lucky guy? None other than Hollywood's one-man entertainment conglomerate--film producer/writer/director John Hughes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
In "Uncle Buck" (citywide), writer-director John Hughes has devised a plot with which to fuse his two genres of choice: the clashing-family-members comedy and the tortured-teen pic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1987 | JACK MATHEWS
"I've been reading you for a long time," film director John Hughes says, as he settles back on one of the leather chairs in his office at Paramount Pictures. "And I've been watching your movies for a long time," his guest says. Pause. Nothing further from Hughes on what he thinks about what he's read. Nothing further from his guest on what he thinks about what he's seen. "Hmmm," the guest thinks to himself. "He remembers everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1991 | David J. Fox
Get ready to rewrite the box-office record books again. Sometime in the next three days, "Home Alone" will replace "Jaws" to become the fourth-highest-grossing movie in the United States. But don't write it in ink. Within another week to 10 days, the John Hughes film about an 8-year-old boy defending his house from burglars will overtake "Return of the Jedi" to become the No. 3-ranked film at the box office. You're probably safe putting that one in ink.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Molly Ringwald's novel-in-stories “When It Happens To You” officially publishes Tuesday. When I talked to her about the book, the conversation often took off into interesting realms that didn't make it into the feature on her that ran in Saturday's Los Angeles Times. Here are a few bonus excerpts from that interview, edited for length and clarity. We'd begun talking informally in a nearby bookstore, where the “50 Shades of Grey” trilogy dominated the bestseller display. She told me that she had read the book because her friend, Bret Easton Ellis, was interested in writing the screenplay adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2011 | By Jamie Wetherbe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The films of John Hughes can teach us a thing or two about how to survive the holidays: Unwelcome kin are best left to their RV, burglars can be thwarted with homemade booby traps, and you should always travel with John Candy. "For the Record: John Hughes (Holiday Road)," a musical production playing at Show at Barre Nov. 17-Dec. 30, is a mash-up of the soundtracks and quotable moments from Hughes' holiday classics — including "Home Alone," "Christmas Vacation" and "Planes, Trains and Automobiles" — with a dose of his '80s teen flicks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010 | By Greg Braxton
John Hughes' film message is simple: The kids are all right. His young heroes were certainly confused, frustrated and angry, but they ultimately proved steely enough to triumph over the often cruel peer pressure and stifling confinement of suburban life. That ethos animated the Oscars on Sunday during a poignant tribute to Hughes, who died in August at age 59 and whose body of work as a writer and director is credited with humorously capturing the teen angst of the '80s generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2009 | Susan King
Though he retreated from Hollywood in the early 1990s to home and family in Chicago, John Hughes really never left popular culture. And for good reason. During the 1980s, he was one of the titans of film comedy as both a writer and director with a particular affinity for exploring the complex world of the teenager. His death of a heart attack in August at 59 left his legion of fans feeling as if they'd lost a bit of their youth. They can get a little of that back Friday through Wednesday as the American Cinematheque pays homage to the influential auteur.
OPINION
August 13, 2009 | MEGHAN DAUM
When I heard director John Hughes had died, a week ago today, I found myself feeling preemptively protective of his legacy. He directed only eight movies, though he wrote and produced dozens more (including the iconically Hughesian Molly Ringwald picture, "Pretty in Pink"), and just four of them were about adolescents. But with his debut, 1984's "Sixteen Candles," he secured his role as chief agent and apostle of Generation X -- a term that wouldn't be coined for several more years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2009 | Mark Caro
The setting could have been lifted from one of his movies: a bright summer day amid beautiful houses and expansive lawns on Chicago's North Shore. But in place of boisterous laughter and iconoclastic spirit was a mood quiet and somber as family, friends and colleagues such as Matthew Broderick, Ben Stein and Vince Vaughn gathered in a Lake Forest funeral home Tuesday to remember filmmaker John Hughes. Hughes, who directed such enduring '80s teen comedies as "The Breakfast Club" and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and oversaw the 1990 box-office smash "Home Alone" while living on the North Shore, died Thursday of a heart attack in Manhattan at 59. He was remembered at an invitation-only service at Wenban Funeral Home, where security personnel checked off mourners' names at the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Miracle on 34th Street" is one of the genuinely beloved holiday movies, winner of a trio of Oscars in 1947 and a Christmas season fixture ever since. So producer/co-writer John Hughes, the force behind this remake, has understandably tried hard to be faithful to its spirit. Hughes has shared his screenplay credit with initial writer George Seaton, cast Alvin Greenman (who played a teen-age Santa back then) in a cameo role, and even tried to get R.H.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1991 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the age of the Hollywood mega-deal is really over, 20th Century Fox Film Corp. apparently hasn't heard the news. The News Corp. movie unit is preparing to commit more than $200 million to a seven-film agreement with writer-director John Hughes, who produced "Home Alone" for the studio, according to sources familiar with the deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2009 | Juliette Funes
Amid a New Wave soundtrack, girls sporting side ponytails and neon, ruffled prom dresses walked into the parking lot of an old Circuit City on Sunset Boulevard on Saturday night in what amounted to a flashback to the '80s. The premises had been transformed into a "Pretty in Pink" prom-themed movie event and an impromptu homage to filmmaker John Hughes, the man who gave a voice to the teen generation of the 1980s and who died of a heart attack last week. The Hollywood "Almost Free" Outdoor Cinema screened the 1986 film, which explores love and the cruelty of high school cliques.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2009 | Todd Martens
Teen angst doesn't belong to one generation more than any other. Isolation, awkwardness and a general distrust of authority are staples, whether kids are listening to the Beatles on vinyl or Paramore on an iPhone. But if the boomers had Woodstock, Generation X had John Hughes. What was it like to grow up in the '80s? One can reference a string of political or cultural touchstones, or one can turn to Hughes' films for the quickest, easiest and shortest answer. It sounded, perhaps, something like Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)
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