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John Hull

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April 7, 1991 | Brad Leithauser, Leithauser's third book of poems, "The Mail From Anywhere," recently was published by Alfred A. Knopf
In June of 1983, about three years after having been declared legally blind and a few months after the outer world's final, wan flickers had dissolved into a uniform blackness, John Hull began to keep a journal. The result, "Touching the Rock," is therefore less concerned with the encroachment of the dark than with the acceptance of an unchanging, irreversible calamity.
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April 7, 1991 | Brad Leithauser, Leithauser's third book of poems, "The Mail From Anywhere," recently was published by Alfred A. Knopf
In June of 1983, about three years after having been declared legally blind and a few months after the outer world's final, wan flickers had dissolved into a uniform blackness, John Hull began to keep a journal. The result, "Touching the Rock," is therefore less concerned with the encroachment of the dark than with the acceptance of an unchanging, irreversible calamity.
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NEWS
December 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Nicaraguan judge ordered police to arrest U.S. rancher John Hull, who allegedly was a Contra collaborator, for possible extradition to Costa Rica. The Costa Rican government claims that Hull used his ranch to run cocaine and supply arms to the Contras opposing Nicaragua's former Sandinista government in the 1980s. He also faces secondary murder charges in connection with a 1984 bombing at a press conference that killed three journalists, a Costa Rican spokesman said.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Nicaraguan judge ordered police to arrest U.S. rancher John Hull, who allegedly was a Contra collaborator, for possible extradition to Costa Rica. The Costa Rican government claims that Hull used his ranch to run cocaine and supply arms to the Contras opposing Nicaragua's former Sandinista government in the 1980s. He also faces secondary murder charges in connection with a 1984 bombing at a press conference that killed three journalists, a Costa Rican spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1989
On May 10 the front page of The Times aroused my immediate interest with news of John Hull in "An American 'Don' Falls in Costa Rica" by Richard Boudreaux. I have been following this important political, criminal and drug case as reported by the Christic Institute in its lawsuit naming the same persons. Sen. John Kerry's (D-Mass.) hearings, which never received the press they deserved, substantiate the same allegations, same events, places and people. The Times reported in early February that Judge James Lawrence King in Miami threw out the Christic Institute lawsuit on behalf of journalists Tony Avirgan and Martha Honey for lack of evidence.
NEWS
August 3, 1987
A federal lending agency has asked the Justice Department to investigate a key member of the covert contra -supply network for "possible civil and criminal fraud" in his company's failure to repay a $375,000 government loan. A company headed by John Hull, an American rancher in Costa Rica who has acknowledged working as a CIA operative in aiding the contras, got the loan in 1984 from the Overseas Private Investment Corp. Hull has denied that any fraud took place. He has helped channel U.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | From Newsday
John Hull, the wealthy American expatriate alleged to have facilitated a guns-for-drugs operation at his Costa Rican ranch, has arrived in the United States after jumping bail on charges stemming from his involvement in Oliver L. North's Contra supply network. Hull's lawyer, Thomas Spencer, said Hull, 69, surfaced in Miami and was en route to his home in Evansville, Ind., to seek medical attention for a heart ailment. Hull fled probable rearrest in Costa Rica last week.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hull, an American CIA collaborator whose Costa Rican ranch was a base for Contra raids into Sandinista-ruled Nicaragua, has turned up here on a self-described mission to aid the country's postwar recovery. But the 70-year-old expatriate's presence has raised a storm of protest from his old Sandinista enemies, threatening to open more wounds than he can heal. They have demanded his arrest as a fugitive from Costa Rica, where he faces war-related criminal charges.
NEWS
January 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
John Hull, an American farmer who allegedly used his Costa Rica ranch to assist the Nicaraguan Contras, was arrested on suspicion of spying for the CIA and of arms and drug smuggling, officials said Friday. Hull was picked up at his ranch in the northern province of San Carlos on Thursday and taken to San Jose, the capital, for questioning.
NEWS
July 24, 1989
A U.S.-born rancher indicted in Costa Rica for arms and drug trafficking in connection with the Iran-Contra affair has vanished, officials said. A spokesman for the Public Security Ministry said Costa Rican authorities haven't seen John Hull since last Thursday. "I suspect that Mr. Hull has been kidnaped," said Juan Jose Sobrado, Hull's lawyer. Hull, 68, from Evansville, Ind., has lived in Costa Rica for the past 20 years and became a naturalized citizen seven years ago.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hull, an American CIA collaborator whose Costa Rican ranch was a base for Contra raids into Sandinista-ruled Nicaragua, has turned up here on a self-described mission to aid the country's postwar recovery. But the 70-year-old expatriate's presence has raised a storm of protest from his old Sandinista enemies, threatening to open more wounds than he can heal. They have demanded his arrest as a fugitive from Costa Rica, where he faces war-related criminal charges.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | From Newsday
John Hull, the wealthy American expatriate alleged to have facilitated a guns-for-drugs operation at his Costa Rican ranch, has arrived in the United States after jumping bail on charges stemming from his involvement in Oliver L. North's Contra supply network. Hull's lawyer, Thomas Spencer, said Hull, 69, surfaced in Miami and was en route to his home in Evansville, Ind., to seek medical attention for a heart ailment. Hull fled probable rearrest in Costa Rica last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1989
On May 10 the front page of The Times aroused my immediate interest with news of John Hull in "An American 'Don' Falls in Costa Rica" by Richard Boudreaux. I have been following this important political, criminal and drug case as reported by the Christic Institute in its lawsuit naming the same persons. Sen. John Kerry's (D-Mass.) hearings, which never received the press they deserved, substantiate the same allegations, same events, places and people. The Times reported in early February that Judge James Lawrence King in Miami threw out the Christic Institute lawsuit on behalf of journalists Tony Avirgan and Martha Honey for lack of evidence.
NEWS
January 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
John Hull, an American farmer who allegedly used his Costa Rica ranch to assist the Nicaraguan Contras, was arrested on suspicion of spying for the CIA and of arms and drug smuggling, officials said Friday. Hull was picked up at his ranch in the northern province of San Carlos on Thursday and taken to San Jose, the capital, for questioning.
NEWS
August 3, 1987
A federal lending agency has asked the Justice Department to investigate a key member of the covert contra -supply network for "possible civil and criminal fraud" in his company's failure to repay a $375,000 government loan. A company headed by John Hull, an American rancher in Costa Rica who has acknowledged working as a CIA operative in aiding the contras, got the loan in 1984 from the Overseas Private Investment Corp. Hull has denied that any fraud took place. He has helped channel U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1989 | From Reuters
U.S. rancher John Hull, detained in Costa Rica two weeks ago on charges of spying for the CIA and of links with arms and drugs traffickers, has been taken to a hospital with apparent heart problems, his doctor said Tuesday. Max Pacheco said that Hull has been in poor health for several months, suffering from diabetes and cardiovascular problems, and was rushed to the hospital Monday. Dr.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | From Associated Press
A former kingpin of the Medellin drug cartel said Colombian drug lords donated about $20 million to the U.S.-backed Contras in Nicaragua. Carlos Lehder Rivas, 40, made his remarks in a broadcast Thursday night of ABC's PrimeTime Live, which interviewed him in the federal prison in Marion, Ill., where Lehder is serving a life sentence plus 135 years. "We did give a great deal of money to the Contra cause . . . I gave.
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