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NEWS
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
John Hume, a Nobel Peace Prize winner and the intellectual architect of the peace process in Northern Ireland, announced that he will resign as leader of the British province's major Roman Catholic party, which he co-founded in 1970. Hume, 64, said he will surrender the helm of the Social Democratic and Labor Party--which holds the most Catholic posts in Northern Ireland's foundering unity government--at the party conference in November.
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OPINION
April 5, 2007
Re "Bush faults Pelosi over trip to Syria," April 4 I want to praise House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for doing the right thing and talking to the Syrians. We will not make peace between our respective countries if we do not talk. Last week, a historic peace agreement was made between old enemies Ian Paisley and Gerry Adams in my hometown of Belfast, Northern Ireland. This peace process was begun by a man named John Hume, who sat down and talked to the terrorists on both sides. It was a long, hard journey, but it has brought peace.
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WORLD
February 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Roman Catholic political leader John Hume, who dedicated his political career to seeking compromise in Northern Ireland, said he would not seek reelection to the British and European parliaments when new elections are called. Hume, 67, cited health reasons. He shared the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize with David Trimble, the moderate Protestant leader of the Ulster Unionist Party, for their roles in achieving the Good Friday peace accord that year.
WORLD
February 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Roman Catholic political leader John Hume, who dedicated his political career to seeking compromise in Northern Ireland, said he would not seek reelection to the British and European parliaments when new elections are called. Hume, 67, cited health reasons. He shared the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize with David Trimble, the moderate Protestant leader of the Ulster Unionist Party, for their roles in achieving the Good Friday peace accord that year.
NEWS
November 10, 1985
The leader of the largest Roman Catholic party in Northern Ireland said he does not expect current Anglo-Irish negotiations to resolve the problems of the province. Speaking at the annual congress of his Social Democratic and Labor Party, John Hume was seeking to dampen expectations that the London-Dublin talks could produce an instant solution to 16 years of violence in the north and centuries of mistrust between Catholics and Protestants.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | Associated Press
John Hume, a Nobel peace laureate and Northern Ireland's senior Roman Catholic statesman, resigned Monday from the province's cross-community legislature, citing his overload of work and shaky health. Hume, 63, said several months ago that he planned to step down as a member of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a central institution forged under terms of the province's 1998 peace accord.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1995
Thomas Plate says that a "diplomatic Houdini" will be needed to extricate British officials from their embarrassment over the IRA's refusal to surrender its weapons (Commentary, July 17). May I point out that it was diplomatic chicanery that got them into this mess in the first place? Prime Minister John Major abandoned whatever high ground he ever held when he engaged in furtive, open-ended negotiations with IRA thugs in 1993 while certifying publicly that such activities would "turn my stomach."
OPINION
April 5, 2007
Re "Bush faults Pelosi over trip to Syria," April 4 I want to praise House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for doing the right thing and talking to the Syrians. We will not make peace between our respective countries if we do not talk. Last week, a historic peace agreement was made between old enemies Ian Paisley and Gerry Adams in my hometown of Belfast, Northern Ireland. This peace process was begun by a man named John Hume, who sat down and talked to the terrorists on both sides. It was a long, hard journey, but it has brought peace.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic and Protestant political parties, John Hume and David Trimble, won the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for the hard work and risks they have undertaken to end 30 years of sectarian violence in the British-ruled province. In honoring a peacemaker from each of the embattled communities, the Norwegian Nobel Committee clearly intended to bolster this year's Good Friday peace agreement against its ardent opponents and doubters.
OPINION
November 1, 1998 | Kelly Candaele, Kelly Candaele is a contributing writer for Irish America magazine and has written for the New York Times and the Nation
Two weeks ago, one-half of the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Northern Irish politician John Hume. The Nobel committee stated that for the past 30 years, Hume had been the "clearest and most consistent" advocate of peace in Northern Ireland. More than 3,200 people have lost their lives in Northern Ireland since the modern "troubles" began in the late 1960s.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
John Hume, a Nobel Peace Prize winner and the intellectual architect of the peace process in Northern Ireland, announced that he will resign as leader of the British province's major Roman Catholic party, which he co-founded in 1970. Hume, 64, said he will surrender the helm of the Social Democratic and Labor Party--which holds the most Catholic posts in Northern Ireland's foundering unity government--at the party conference in November.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | Associated Press
John Hume, a Nobel peace laureate and Northern Ireland's senior Roman Catholic statesman, resigned Monday from the province's cross-community legislature, citing his overload of work and shaky health. Hume, 63, said several months ago that he planned to step down as a member of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a central institution forged under terms of the province's 1998 peace accord.
OPINION
November 1, 1998 | Kelly Candaele, Kelly Candaele is a contributing writer for Irish America magazine and has written for the New York Times and the Nation
Two weeks ago, one-half of the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Northern Irish politician John Hume. The Nobel committee stated that for the past 30 years, Hume had been the "clearest and most consistent" advocate of peace in Northern Ireland. More than 3,200 people have lost their lives in Northern Ireland since the modern "troubles" began in the late 1960s.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic and Protestant political parties, John Hume and David Trimble, won the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for the hard work and risks they have undertaken to end 30 years of sectarian violence in the British-ruled province. In honoring a peacemaker from each of the embattled communities, the Norwegian Nobel Committee clearly intended to bolster this year's Good Friday peace agreement against its ardent opponents and doubters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1995
Thomas Plate says that a "diplomatic Houdini" will be needed to extricate British officials from their embarrassment over the IRA's refusal to surrender its weapons (Commentary, July 17). May I point out that it was diplomatic chicanery that got them into this mess in the first place? Prime Minister John Major abandoned whatever high ground he ever held when he engaged in furtive, open-ended negotiations with IRA thugs in 1993 while certifying publicly that such activities would "turn my stomach."
NEWS
November 10, 1985
The leader of the largest Roman Catholic party in Northern Ireland said he does not expect current Anglo-Irish negotiations to resolve the problems of the province. Speaking at the annual congress of his Social Democratic and Labor Party, John Hume was seeking to dampen expectations that the London-Dublin talks could produce an instant solution to 16 years of violence in the north and centuries of mistrust between Catholics and Protestants.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Irish Prime Minister Bertie Ahern met with the leader of the Irish Republican Army's political wing in Dublin, marking the restart of direct contacts after a new IRA cease-fire in British-ruled Northern Ireland. Ahern, Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams and moderate nationalist leader John Hume jointly urged Northern Ireland's pro-British unionists to back a struggling talks initiative aimed at ending their decades of strife with Irish nationalist republicans.
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