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John Hunter

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What does it feel like when a musician, after toiling the better part of his life away in seedy little honky-tonks, is "discovered" well into his seventh decade? Blues man Long John Hunter, who plays Sunday at the Big Time Blues Festival in Long Beach, can tell you. "It feels real good," he said with a chuckle, on the phone recently from his home in Odessa, Texas. "I'm just glad I'm old enough and wise enough that I don't let it go to my head.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. John J. Hunter, who last fall was abruptly reassigned from First African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black church in Los Angeles, has been fired from his post at a San Francisco church. "I hereby immediately relieve you of the pastoral charge of Bethel AME Church," Bishop Larry T. Kirkland wrote in a letter to Hunter dated Friday. "You will have no further contact with that congregation in an official capacity. " Hunter could not immediately be reached for comment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a musical cliche that you can't play the blues without paying some dues, but Texas bluesman Long John Hunter spent the first 60 years of his life living it. Now he's reaping the rewards. After decades of toiling in obscurity, and at an age when most Americans are looking forward eagerly to retirement, Hunter is shifting into high gear with his music. The 66-year-old singer and guitarist was born in Louisiana and knocked around Texas-Mexico border towns and bars for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The judicial body of the African Methodist Episcopal church has denied the petition of the Rev. John J. Hunter, former leader of First AME in Los Angeles, to return to the helm of the storied black church. Hunter, who was abruptly moved from First AME in October, challenged his reassignment to Bethel AME in San Francisco after that congregation rejected him. He maintains that his rights as a minister were violated, saying Bishop Larry T. Kirkland moved him to a smaller church without the proper 90-day notice and without reason.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2002 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there's any local official who can take credit for the layers of steel fencing dividing the hills of Tijuana from San Diego, it's Rep. Duncan Hunter. The conservative congressman has focused a large portion of his 22-year career on trying to seal the border with Mexico. The imposing fences have thwarted many undocumented migrants, but they have also pushed the flow of illegal immigration east to the deserts and mountains of Imperial County.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. George Deukmejian has announced a pact with the other West Coast states and British Columbia to coordinate oil spill prevention, abatement and response. The governor designated John Hunter, a deputy secretary of the Environmental Affairs Agency, as California's representative to the task force. Deukmejian's announcement said Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia recognize "the compelling need to take additional steps to protect our scenic coastlines."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1989 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, Times Staff Writer
'This kind of thing is way overdue. . . . There were 425 people killed (countywide) in gang-banging last year. If it keeps going, they won't have to worry about banging because there won't be nobody left.' --Ex-gang member John Hunter On the urban battlegrounds of South-Central Los Angeles, a plea for peace has appeared amid the graffiti of gang war. Posters put up last weekend by ex-gang members depict hands clasped in a handshake over a background divided into Crip blue and Blood red.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three minivans and a pickup truck pull up in front of a house on Pleasant Street in East Los Angeles, and nine volunteers climb out to pack the vehicles with 100 or so gallon jugs of water stored in the carport. As they finish, Father Richard Estrada, a tall man in jeans and a white shirt, calls everyone together. They join hands as he prays, "Heavenly Father, help us save lives." It sounds melodramatic in the morning light, but by the end of the day, the words seem prophetic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1986 | DOUG SMITH
The usual crush of people who have business in the prefab complex of Van Nuys Municipal Court had long since dispersed one evening last week when the Apartment Assn. of San Fernando Valley and Ventura County assembled in Division 114 to hold a trial of its own. The association rented the courtroom Wednesday night for its regular meeting. This month's topic was eviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2005 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. John J. Hunter ascended the pulpit of First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles last Sunday and threw open a sanctuary transformed. The church, housing the city's oldest black congregation, is gleaming with new pews and paint, fresh carpet and a gold-edged inscription of its motto, "First to Serve."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. John J. Hunter, who was abruptly reassigned from the oldest black church in Los Angeles last fall, scored a small but significant victory in his petition to reclaim the helm of First African Methodist Episcopal Church. A nine-member church judicial panel partly sided with Hunter and found that his new church, Bethel San Francisco, was out of line when congregants physically blocked him from taking the pulpit. The committee - the African Methodist Episcopal denomination's equivalent of a Supreme Court - has not yet issued a decision on the most contentious charge made by Hunter: that Bishop T. Larry Kirkland violated the Minister's Bill of Rights by abruptly transferring him without the proper 90-day notice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
As the pastor of the oldest black church in Los Angeles, the Rev. John J. Hunter earned a generous salary, lived in a $2-million home and drove a Mercedes-Benz paid for by the church. His wife earned $147,000 a year running nonprofit organizations connected to the 19,000-member congregation. But over the last few years, the hilltop church in the West Adams district has fallen into debt. The First African Methodist Episcopal Church owes nearly $500,000 to creditors. Some vendors say they have not been paid in more than a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - In an unprecedented move, officials of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black pulpit in the city, have rejected the troubled Los Angeles pastor assigned to lead its flock. The Rev. John J. Hunter was recently transferred from First AME, one of the nation's most prominent black churches, after an eight-year tenure marred by a sexual harassment lawsuit, a federal tax investigation and the questionable use of church credit cards. Hunter was slated to make his pastoral debut at Bethel AME this month, but church officials drafted an emergency resolution barring him from taking control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. J. Edgar Boyd delivered his inaugural sermon Sunday as the new pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church in L.A., seeking to unite and heal a congregation that had become fractured over the troubles of its former leader. Addressing worshipers, a seemingly nervous Boyd used parables to talk about forgiveness. But to the thousands in the packed room, the message was clear: A new leader was at the helm to restore the image of the oldest black pulpit in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe and Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black pulpit in Los Angeles, has been reassigned after a controversial eight years that included a sexual harassment lawsuit, a federal tax investigation and questionable use of church credit cards. Pastor John J. Hunter was moved to Bethel AME San Francisco by Bishop T. Larry Kirkland. Neither Kirkland nor Hunter could be reached for comment Friday. Kirkland appointed the San Francisco church's pastor, the Rev. J. Edgar Boyd, to take the helm in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
Nearly five years after replacing a legendary pastor in one of the nation's most prominent African American pulpits, the Rev. John J. Hunter counts his blessings. Since taking the helm of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles in October 2004, Hunter says, he has been privileged to bring 3,000 new souls to Jesus. He and his staff have launched such new community services as a summer enrichment program for children deprived of summer school by budget cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A choice sampling of the many flavors of the blues was served up Sunday at the fourth annual Big Time Blues Festival at Gemmrig Park, where the serene, wooded setting, family-friendly atmosphere, tasty soul food and interesting arts-and-crafts concessions combined with a top-notch bill of eclectic performers to make this one heck of a fine way to spend a summer afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1996 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His debut album on Alligator Records is called "Long John Hunter: Border Town Legend." And Hunter, who plays at B.B. King's on Friday and Saturday, got the apposition the old-fashioned way. He earned it. Hunter, 65, cut his musical teeth in the border town of Juarez, Mexico. A Texan, Hunter crossed the border into Mexico, where he worked in the Lobby Bar for 13 years straight starting in 1957. This was hard-core dues-paying where union rules did not apply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Watanabe is a Times staff writer.
The pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles apologized to his congregants Sunday for any embarrassment caused by disclosures that he had used church credit cards for sizable personal expenses and had failed to pay federal taxes for several years. Pastor John J. Hunter, 51, used church credit cards to pay for at least $122,000 in personal expenses, including family vacations, clothes, jewelry, bikes and auto supplies, The Times reported Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Watanabe is a Times staff writer.
The pastor of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church, one of the oldest and most prominent black congregations in Los Angeles, used church credit cards to pay for at least $122,000 in personal expenses over a three-year period, including jewelry, family vacations, clothing and auto supplies, according to documents and church sources.
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