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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
With his shock of silver-gray hair, his face etched by time with the lean expressiveness of a Giacometti sculpture and his soulful eyes registering every fleeting hurt and happiness, John Hurt bears a striking resemblance to Samuel Beckett in the distinguished British actor's magnificent rendition of "Krapp's Last Tape" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. For anyone needing a reminder that theater can be an art (and not just a scrappy entertainment), this beautifully mounted production of Beckett's play, directed by Michael Colgan of Dublin's Gate Theatre, is not to be missed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Abele
  The Vietnam-era Southern family saga "Jayne Mansfield's Car," Billy Bob Thornton's first directorial outing in more than a decade, is old-fashioned big-cast melodrama, treated by its director as if it were a nostalgic heirloom. Written with Thornton's "One False Move" co-writer Tom Epperson, the movie even gets away with its classicist vibe for a good while too. Robert Duvall plays an small-town Alabama patriarch with three middle-aged sons (zoned-out loner Thornton, hard-headed Robert Patrick, anti-war hippie Kevin Bacon)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By David Ng
John Hurt performing Samuel Beckett's "Krapp's Last Tape" will be among the highlights of the Kirk Douglas Theatre's 2012-13 season, which will be announced Thursday by Center Theatre Group. The season will feature a total of five main productions, including the world premiere of the plays “The Royale” by Marco Ramirez and "The Nether" by Jennifer Haley.  Opening the season will be "Elephant Room" (Aug. 22 to Sept. 16), an ensemble piece that will make its West Coast premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Technology is messing with John Hurt's head. His rental cellphone is ringing like mad, but when he tries to answer it, no one's there. "Four new messages!" the British actor exclaims, scrutinizing the phone's display screen as if it were written in Sanskrit. "What's going on?" Krapp would sympathize. In "Krapp's Last Tape," Samuel Beckett's quietly devastating one-act memory play, an isolated old man, a writer named Krapp, squares off with another confounding technological contraption: a reel-to-reel tape recorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Technology is messing with John Hurt's head. His rental cellphone is ringing like mad, but when he tries to answer it, no one's there. "Four new messages!" the British actor exclaims, scrutinizing the phone's display screen as if it were written in Sanskrit. "What's going on?" Krapp would sympathize. In "Krapp's Last Tape," Samuel Beckett's quietly devastating one-act memory play, an isolated old man, a writer named Krapp, squares off with another confounding technological contraption: a reel-to-reel tape recorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Second Best" is such a splendid, intimate film you worry that it's going to get lost in the thicket of much bigger, far more highly publicized fall releases. The irony is that for all its modesty of scale it has the universal appeal of a richly realized father-and-son relationship, portrayed by William Hurt, in one of the finest performances of his career, and by a remarkable newcomer, neophyte actor Chris Cleary Miles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The folk side of blues icon Hurt's folk-blues equation gets the play here, with light-fingered picking and easy-ambling singing applied to heroic myth (Beck's "Stagolee"), gospel (John Hiatt's "I'm Satisfied") and scenes from life (Steve & Justin Earle's "Candy Man"). Executive producer Peter Case teams with Dave Alvin for a rich "Monday Morning Blues," while Geoff Muldaur (with two daughters) echoes his boho-hippie jug-band past with the giddy "Chicken."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1998 | LIZA BEAR, NEWSDAY
What happens when an older, very English discerning man of letters on one side of the big pond falls for an all-American teen movie heartthrob on the other? As the love-struck writer in "Love and Death on Long Island," John Hurt's Giles De'Ath (death, get it?) eventually leaves his London study, hops on a plane and heads for the fictional Chesterton, Long Island, N.Y., home of Jason Priestley's Ronnie Bostock.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition. Zan Dubin, who covers the arts for The Times, also contributed.
Jackson Browne arrived reluctantly in Fullerton at age 12, and left eagerly at 17. In between, he earned a superfluous diploma, class of 1966, while nursing a general, but not absolute, loathing for Sunny Hills High School. In the eyes of Clyde J.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Frank Rose, Frank Rose, the New York-based author of "The Agency: William Morris and the Hidden History of Show Business," writes frequently about Hollywood
Barry Navidi is still trying to figure out just what happened. Last July he was on location in Ballycotton, Ireland, making a $13-million movie--modest by Hollywood standards but impressive for a fledgling producer from London, especially since it starred Marlon Brando and Debra Winger and had Johnny Depp and John Hurt in supporting roles. A month later he was hoofing it in Beverly Hills--no hotel suite, staying with a friend, having lost his home, his money, his partner's money, his partner's father's money, an outside backer's money and seven years of work on a picture that folded after two weeks of shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
With his shock of silver-gray hair, his face etched by time with the lean expressiveness of a Giacometti sculpture and his soulful eyes registering every fleeting hurt and happiness, John Hurt bears a striking resemblance to Samuel Beckett in the distinguished British actor's magnificent rendition of "Krapp's Last Tape" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. For anyone needing a reminder that theater can be an art (and not just a scrappy entertainment), this beautifully mounted production of Beckett's play, directed by Michael Colgan of Dublin's Gate Theatre, is not to be missed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By David Ng
John Hurt performing Samuel Beckett's "Krapp's Last Tape" will be among the highlights of the Kirk Douglas Theatre's 2012-13 season, which will be announced Thursday by Center Theatre Group. The season will feature a total of five main productions, including the world premiere of the plays “The Royale” by Marco Ramirez and "The Nether" by Jennifer Haley.  Opening the season will be "Elephant Room" (Aug. 22 to Sept. 16), an ensemble piece that will make its West Coast premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The folk side of blues icon Hurt's folk-blues equation gets the play here, with light-fingered picking and easy-ambling singing applied to heroic myth (Beck's "Stagolee"), gospel (John Hiatt's "I'm Satisfied") and scenes from life (Steve & Justin Earle's "Candy Man"). Executive producer Peter Case teams with Dave Alvin for a rich "Monday Morning Blues," while Geoff Muldaur (with two daughters) echoes his boho-hippie jug-band past with the giddy "Chicken."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1998 | LIZA BEAR, NEWSDAY
What happens when an older, very English discerning man of letters on one side of the big pond falls for an all-American teen movie heartthrob on the other? As the love-struck writer in "Love and Death on Long Island," John Hurt's Giles De'Ath (death, get it?) eventually leaves his London study, hops on a plane and heads for the fictional Chesterton, Long Island, N.Y., home of Jason Priestley's Ronnie Bostock.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Frank Rose, Frank Rose, the New York-based author of "The Agency: William Morris and the Hidden History of Show Business," writes frequently about Hollywood
Barry Navidi is still trying to figure out just what happened. Last July he was on location in Ballycotton, Ireland, making a $13-million movie--modest by Hollywood standards but impressive for a fledgling producer from London, especially since it starred Marlon Brando and Debra Winger and had Johnny Depp and John Hurt in supporting roles. A month later he was hoofing it in Beverly Hills--no hotel suite, staying with a friend, having lost his home, his money, his partner's money, his partner's father's money, an outside backer's money and seven years of work on a picture that folded after two weeks of shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Second Best" is such a splendid, intimate film you worry that it's going to get lost in the thicket of much bigger, far more highly publicized fall releases. The irony is that for all its modesty of scale it has the universal appeal of a richly realized father-and-son relationship, portrayed by William Hurt, in one of the finest performances of his career, and by a remarkable newcomer, neophyte actor Chris Cleary Miles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Abele
  The Vietnam-era Southern family saga "Jayne Mansfield's Car," Billy Bob Thornton's first directorial outing in more than a decade, is old-fashioned big-cast melodrama, treated by its director as if it were a nostalgic heirloom. Written with Thornton's "One False Move" co-writer Tom Epperson, the movie even gets away with its classicist vibe for a good while too. Robert Duvall plays an small-town Alabama patriarch with three middle-aged sons (zoned-out loner Thornton, hard-headed Robert Patrick, anti-war hippie Kevin Bacon)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
What under the planets would make Sigourney Weaver, a young woman who most assuredly knows how many beans make five, climb back into her skivvies and head straight back to the planet Acheron, home of the great slathering, acid-dripping Alien? It munched up her entire crew back in 1979 and has given her sweat-bathed nightmares now. Compassion for other human beings, that's what.
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