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John Hurtado

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NEWS
April 26, 1990
On April 18, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy John Hurtado was relieved of duty--one of 26 narcotics officers suspended in a money-skimming scandal. Following are excerpts of a tape-recording made by Hurtado as he was questioned by FBI Agent John R. Kingston and IRS Agent Robert B. Warren. Kingston: Well, basically, we are just here to inform you of what we plan on doing as a task force and, hopefully, giving you an option of what you want to do. . . .
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NEWS
April 26, 1990
On April 18, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy John Hurtado was relieved of duty--one of 26 narcotics officers suspended in a money-skimming scandal. Following are excerpts of a tape-recording made by Hurtado as he was questioned by FBI Agent John R. Kingston and IRS Agent Robert B. Warren. Kingston: Well, basically, we are just here to inform you of what we plan on doing as a task force and, hopefully, giving you an option of what you want to do. . . .
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NEWS
April 26, 1990 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immediately after he was suspended in a money-skimming scandal, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy John Hurtado was ushered last week into an interrogation room where two federal agents were waiting to solicit his cooperation in the broadening investigation. The investigators began by appealing to Hurtado's patriotism, reminding the 10-year sheriff's veteran that he was a former Marine.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immediately after he was suspended in a money-skimming scandal, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy John Hurtado was ushered last week into an interrogation room where two federal agents were waiting to solicit his cooperation in the broadening investigation. The investigators began by appealing to Hurtado's patriotism, reminding the 10-year sheriff's veteran that he was a former Marine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1994
An ex-Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy was sentenced Friday to five months in prison and five months of home confinement for his role in a corruption case involving a drug investigative unit. Richard Ballestros, who hid $150,000 that a former colleague stole, was found guilty at his retrial of obstruction of justice. The 34-year-old Norwalk resident will remain free on $25,000 bond pending his appeal. U.S. District Judge Mariana Pfaelzer denied his motion for a new trial and acquittal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies and a third deputy who had been working as a narcotics officer until his recent arrest were indicted on corruption charges as part of a massive drug money skimming investigation, federal officials said Friday. The indictments brought to 33 the number of defendants named in the "Operation Big Spender" probe, which has resulted in the conviction of 19 former deputies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1993
Two more former narcotics deputies of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department were indicted in an ongoing federal investigation of drug money skimming that has resulted in 12 convictions so far, U.S. Atty. Terree A. Bowers announced Wednesday. Edward D. Jamison, 43, of Chino Hills, formerly a member of several drug enforcement units, was charged with filing a false income tax return and structuring financial transactions to avoid reporting requirements. John R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1990 | DARYL KELLEY and VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County Claims Board has approved payment of $275,000 to a convicted drug dealer seriously injured in 1985 by a deputy implicated in the Sheriff's Department money-skimming scandal. The award, which still must be approved by the Board of Supervisors, would be the first civil payout by the county involving 18 sheriff's narcotics officers suspected of stealing money during drug raids, county lawyers said. Since the scandal surfaced Sept.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | JIM NEWTON and VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An exhaustive, self-critical investigation by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department has uncovered no evidence of CIA involvement in Southern California drug trafficking, but has turned up controversial new details about the conduct of local narcotics officers--including admissions that one group of sheriff's deputies stole roughly $50,000 during a 1986 raid.
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