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John Iacovelli

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Backstage at South Coast Repertory, the cast and crew call it "the battle of the sets." In one corner: "Search and Destroy," Howard Korder's chronicle of a man who will do anything for success in the get-ahead '80s. The spare Mainstage set is sleek, cold and immaculate. In the other corner: "Holy Days," Sally Nemeth's tale of two farm couples surviving the Kansas Dust Bowl during the Depression a half-century earlier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Backstage at South Coast Repertory, the cast and crew call it "the battle of the sets." In one corner: "Search and Destroy," Howard Korder's chronicle of a man who will do anything for success in the get-ahead '80s. The spare Mainstage set is sleek, cold and immaculate. In the other corner: "Holy Days," Sally Nemeth's tale of two farm couples surviving the Kansas Dust Bowl during the Depression a half-century earlier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1992
Production: George Bernard Shaw's "Heartbreak House" Direction: Martin Benson, "Heartbreak House" Lead Performance: Paxton Whitehead, "Heartbreak House," Richard Frank, "Kiss of the Spider Woman" Scenic design: John Iacovelli, "Heartbreak House," Marjorie Bradley Kellogg, "Pirates" Costume design: Ann Bruice, "You Can't Take It With You," Shigeru Yaji, "Happy End"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1997 | JANA MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Share a killing with someone you love" is the central theme of Rupert Holmes' "Accomplice." Both a loving tribute and a sly parody of murder mysteries, this play twists and turns and finally wriggles away with a bright, almost-too-clever premise. Director Jules Aaron fully exploits the story's laugh-potential and its quirky self-awareness at La Mirada Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1997 | JANA MONJI
"Share a killing with someone you love" is the central theme of Rupert Holmes' "Accomplice." Both a loving tribute and a sly parody of murder mysteries, this play twists and turns and finally wriggles away with a bright, almost-too-clever premise. Director Jules Aaron fully exploits the story's laugh-potential and its quirky self-awareness at La Mirada Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Henry, I have a confession," Eleanor of Aquitaine says to her husband, King Henry II. "I don't much like our children." That line, from "The Lion in Winter," always draws a laugh, and the laugh is always tempered by understanding--for the audience sees full well that Eleanor and Henry's greedy, duplicitous, rage-filled children are exactly what Mommy and Daddy have made them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Power to the people and oy gevalt. "Godspell," the quintessential 1970s Bible musical, is back, at the Alex Theatre in Glendale. It's back, and boy, is it dated. Stephen Schwartz wrote some big, open-hearted tunes to break up the Greatest Story Ever Told. Jesus comes to Earth to teach Bible parables, in this case, to nine urban dwellers (raising the question: Were three disciples let go?).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1992
There have been even more exciting times for Orange County's much-honored South Coast Repertory theater, but last week's honors from the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle were especially gratifying. They offered strong evidence--as if any was needed--that SCR's 1988 Tony Award for the nation's best regional theater was no fluke. SCR's excellence is also a sign of how far Orange County's cultural life has advanced in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1997 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gael, Gemma and Matt--siblings in their 30s--have been in limbo ever since their parents' small Cessna disappeared over Labrador. Now a year has passed, and Gael is determined to move on with her life by moving from the family estate in upstate New York back to the big city. But Gemma is still an agoraphobic, obsessed with clipping her mother's magazines, while Matt seems to have disappeared almost as thoroughly as their parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2000 | JANA MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Don Snell's one-man show, "A Private Spirit . . . The Music and Wit of Noel Coward," doesn't show ennui, it inspires it. Coward's world-weariness and sophisticated flair are nowhere to be found. This Tiffany Theater and Ebury Street Productions presentation buries the lyrics of Coward's little ditties under the live band and smothers Coward's urbane wit under Snell's ho-hum stage presence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Theatrical lighting designer Martin Aronstein, a five-time Tony nominee and one of the outstanding designers in Los Angeles theater, died of heart failure May 3 at Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys. He was 65. Born in Pittsfield, Mass., and raised in New York, Aronstein began working for the New York Shakespeare Festival soon after leaving Queens College in the late 1950s. He remained affiliated with the organization until 1977.
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