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John J Hunter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The judicial body of the African Methodist Episcopal church has denied the petition of the Rev. John J. Hunter, former leader of First AME in Los Angeles, to return to the helm of the storied black church. Hunter, who was abruptly moved from First AME in October, challenged his reassignment to Bethel AME in San Francisco after that congregation rejected him. He maintains that his rights as a minister were violated, saying Bishop Larry T. Kirkland moved him to a smaller church without the proper 90-day notice and without reason.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. John J. Hunter, who last fall was abruptly reassigned from First African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black church in Los Angeles, has been fired from his post at a San Francisco church. "I hereby immediately relieve you of the pastoral charge of Bethel AME Church," Bishop Larry T. Kirkland wrote in a letter to Hunter dated Friday. "You will have no further contact with that congregation in an official capacity. " Hunter could not immediately be reached for comment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Watanabe is a Times staff writer.
The pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles apologized to his congregants Sunday for any embarrassment caused by disclosures that he had used church credit cards for sizable personal expenses and had failed to pay federal taxes for several years. Pastor John J. Hunter, 51, used church credit cards to pay for at least $122,000 in personal expenses, including family vacations, clothes, jewelry, bikes and auto supplies, The Times reported Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The judicial body of the African Methodist Episcopal church has denied the petition of the Rev. John J. Hunter, former leader of First AME in Los Angeles, to return to the helm of the storied black church. Hunter, who was abruptly moved from First AME in October, challenged his reassignment to Bethel AME in San Francisco after that congregation rejected him. He maintains that his rights as a minister were violated, saying Bishop Larry T. Kirkland moved him to a smaller church without the proper 90-day notice and without reason.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1992 | GARY GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brice Traynor's legal problems started when he ignored a school crossing guard in Ventura, and they escalated when he was sentenced for contempt of court after telling off a judge. But after serving five days on his contempt citation, the 83-year-old Ojai man isn't showing any signs of remorse. In fact, Traynor said Monday, he has as much contempt as ever for a judge who would put a man as old as he is behind bars just because he might have complained too loudly about a $106 fine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Watanabe is a Times staff writer.
The pastor of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church, one of the oldest and most prominent black congregations in Los Angeles, used church credit cards to pay for at least $122,000 in personal expenses over a three-year period, including jewelry, family vacations, clothing and auto supplies, according to documents and church sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. J. Edgar Boyd delivered his inaugural sermon Sunday as the new pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church in L.A., seeking to unite and heal a congregation that had become fractured over the troubles of its former leader. Addressing worshipers, a seemingly nervous Boyd used parables to talk about forgiveness. But to the thousands in the packed room, the message was clear: A new leader was at the helm to restore the image of the oldest black pulpit in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. John J. Hunter, who was abruptly reassigned from the oldest black church in Los Angeles last fall, scored a small but significant victory in his petition to reclaim the helm of First African Methodist Episcopal Church. A nine-member church judicial panel partly sided with Hunter and found that his new church, Bethel San Francisco, was out of line when congregants physically blocked him from taking the pulpit. The committee - the African Methodist Episcopal denomination's equivalent of a Supreme Court - has not yet issued a decision on the most contentious charge made by Hunter: that Bishop T. Larry Kirkland violated the Minister's Bill of Rights by abruptly transferring him without the proper 90-day notice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. John J. Hunter, who led protests against alleged police brutality and racism as head of a socially active congregation in Seattle, was named Monday to succeed the Rev. Cecil L. "Chip" Murray as senior pastor of First AME Church in Los Angeles. The appointment to succeed the legendary Murray, 75, who is retiring after 27 years at the helm of the city's oldest black church, was announced in St. Louis by the Right Rev. John R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
As the pastor of the oldest black church in Los Angeles, the Rev. John J. Hunter earned a generous salary, lived in a $2-million home and drove a Mercedes-Benz paid for by the church. His wife earned $147,000 a year running nonprofit organizations connected to the 19,000-member congregation. But over the last few years, the hilltop church in the West Adams district has fallen into debt. The First African Methodist Episcopal Church owes nearly $500,000 to creditors. Some vendors say they have not been paid in more than a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2013 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. John J. Hunter, who was abruptly reassigned from the oldest black church in Los Angeles last fall, scored a small but significant victory in his petition to reclaim the helm of First African Methodist Episcopal Church. A nine-member church judicial panel partly sided with Hunter and found that his new church, Bethel San Francisco, was out of line when congregants physically blocked him from taking the pulpit. The committee - the African Methodist Episcopal denomination's equivalent of a Supreme Court - has not yet issued a decision on the most contentious charge made by Hunter: that Bishop T. Larry Kirkland violated the Minister's Bill of Rights by abruptly transferring him without the proper 90-day notice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
As the pastor of the oldest black church in Los Angeles, the Rev. John J. Hunter earned a generous salary, lived in a $2-million home and drove a Mercedes-Benz paid for by the church. His wife earned $147,000 a year running nonprofit organizations connected to the 19,000-member congregation. But over the last few years, the hilltop church in the West Adams district has fallen into debt. The First African Methodist Episcopal Church owes nearly $500,000 to creditors. Some vendors say they have not been paid in more than a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - In an unprecedented move, officials of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black pulpit in the city, have rejected the troubled Los Angeles pastor assigned to lead its flock. The Rev. John J. Hunter was recently transferred from First AME, one of the nation's most prominent black churches, after an eight-year tenure marred by a sexual harassment lawsuit, a federal tax investigation and the questionable use of church credit cards. Hunter was slated to make his pastoral debut at Bethel AME this month, but church officials drafted an emergency resolution barring him from taking control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. J. Edgar Boyd delivered his inaugural sermon Sunday as the new pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church in L.A., seeking to unite and heal a congregation that had become fractured over the troubles of its former leader. Addressing worshipers, a seemingly nervous Boyd used parables to talk about forgiveness. But to the thousands in the packed room, the message was clear: A new leader was at the helm to restore the image of the oldest black pulpit in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe and Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
The pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black pulpit in Los Angeles, has been reassigned after a controversial eight years that included a sexual harassment lawsuit, a federal tax investigation and questionable use of church credit cards. Pastor John J. Hunter was moved to Bethel AME San Francisco by Bishop T. Larry Kirkland. Neither Kirkland nor Hunter could be reached for comment Friday. Kirkland appointed the San Francisco church's pastor, the Rev. J. Edgar Boyd, to take the helm in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
Nearly five years after replacing a legendary pastor in one of the nation's most prominent African American pulpits, the Rev. John J. Hunter counts his blessings. Since taking the helm of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles in October 2004, Hunter says, he has been privileged to bring 3,000 new souls to Jesus. He and his staff have launched such new community services as a summer enrichment program for children deprived of summer school by budget cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
Nearly five years after replacing a legendary pastor in one of the nation's most prominent African American pulpits, the Rev. John J. Hunter counts his blessings. Since taking the helm of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles in October 2004, Hunter says, he has been privileged to bring 3,000 new souls to Jesus. He and his staff have launched such new community services as a summer enrichment program for children deprived of summer school by budget cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - In an unprecedented move, officials of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black pulpit in the city, have rejected the troubled Los Angeles pastor assigned to lead its flock. The Rev. John J. Hunter was recently transferred from First AME, one of the nation's most prominent black churches, after an eight-year tenure marred by a sexual harassment lawsuit, a federal tax investigation and the questionable use of church credit cards. Hunter was slated to make his pastoral debut at Bethel AME this month, but church officials drafted an emergency resolution barring him from taking control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Watanabe is a Times staff writer.
The pastor of First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles apologized to his congregants Sunday for any embarrassment caused by disclosures that he had used church credit cards for sizable personal expenses and had failed to pay federal taxes for several years. Pastor John J. Hunter, 51, used church credit cards to pay for at least $122,000 in personal expenses, including family vacations, clothes, jewelry, bikes and auto supplies, The Times reported Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Watanabe is a Times staff writer.
The pastor of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church, one of the oldest and most prominent black congregations in Los Angeles, used church credit cards to pay for at least $122,000 in personal expenses over a three-year period, including jewelry, family vacations, clothing and auto supplies, according to documents and church sources.
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