Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn J Kelly
IN THE NEWS

John J Kelly

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government could decide on a possible indictment of a former nuclear weapon scientist as early as next week, according to senior administration officials. Wen Ho Lee, a U.S. citizen from Taiwan, was fired in March for alleged security violations at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Officials indicated the government will not prosecute Lee for allegedly passing nuclear secrets to China due to lack of evidence. However, the U.S. attorney in Albuquerque, John J.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
With one leading forecaster predicting 10 tropical storms, including a half-dozen hurricanes, emergency management officials gathered Wednesday to plan for the upcoming hurricane season. "We can change the impact of disasters. We, as a nation, can reduce the loss of life . . . by taking effective action now," Joe Allbaugh, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, told the opening session of the 2001 National Hurricane Conference.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wen Ho Lee walked out of court a free man Wednesday after a federal judge repeatedly apologized for incarcerating him for nine months without trial and angrily rebuked the Clinton administration for its handling of a case that "embarrassed this entire nation." In a morning marked by high drama, laughter and tears of joy, the former Los Alamos nuclear weapon scientist agreed in thickly accented English to a negotiated deal that brings an abrupt end to the highly controversial case.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | from United Press International
The Superior Court has upheld equal rights of a divorced couple of different faiths to the religious education of their children, saying a Catholic father must continue to take them to Jewish Sunday school, but can't be barred from taking them to Catholic Mass. In a 59-page opinion written by Judge John T.J. Kelly, issued last week, the court decided 2-1 that it would be a violation of the father's constitutional rights to prevent him from exposing his children to his culture.
NEWS
December 28, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jailed Los Alamos physicist Wen Ho Lee transferred some of America's most valuable nuclear weapons secrets into a computer network so accessible to the outside world that they were "open to not very sophisticated hackers on the Internet," a government witness said Monday. The testimony at a federal court hearing in Albuquerque came as U.S.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI has sent a team of experts on Chinese spying techniques to Los Alamos National Laboratory in a widening investigation of a former lab scientist who is suspected of passing vast amounts of nuclear weapon secrets to Beijing. The stepped-up FBI investigation is specifically looking at why Wen Ho Lee, the chief suspect in the espionage case, downloaded highly classified computer programs and data onto an unprotected office network in several distinct bursts between 1983 and 1995.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Subpoenas served Wednesday show that the Senate investigation of Democratic Party fund-raising will be an extraordinarily wide-ranging probe that seeks information involving hundreds of individuals and corporations in the United States and Asia.
NEWS
September 17, 1998 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno on Wednesday named New Mexico's chief federal prosecutor as "border czar" to succeed former U.S. Atty. Alan Bersin, who used the largely symbolic post in San Diego as an attention-getter for border issues including a major crackdown on illegal immigration. The appointment of U.S. Atty. John J. Kelly as Reno's special representative for the Southwest border took some California elected officials by surprise.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI agents shadow Wen Ho Lee constantly these days, watching and trailing the former nuclear weapons expert so closely that the feds call it "bumper-lock surveillance." "He hears footsteps behind him," one official said. "It's 24 hours a day, wherever he is. Multiple agents follow him."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling him brazen and uncommonly lucky, the FBI and San Diego police said Monday that luck simply ran out on the so-called A's Bandit, the ordinary-looking robbery suspect arrested Friday shortly after the 29th in a string of San Diego-area robberies that achieved national reknown. Young, preppie and clean-cut, the robbery suspect confounded authorities for three months precisely because he was so ordinary-looking, authorities said at a press conference shortly after David W.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|