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John J Sheehan

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NEWS
July 3, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gen. John J. Sheehan, the iconoclastic Marine who had been considered a candidate to become the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has given notice he will retire from the service on Oct. 1, officials said. Sheehan's decision is another sign of Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's determination to move cautiously in filling the chairman's post after the controversy that recently enveloped another candidate, Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston.
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NEWS
July 3, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gen. John J. Sheehan, the iconoclastic Marine who had been considered a candidate to become the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has given notice he will retire from the service on Oct. 1, officials said. Sheehan's decision is another sign of Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's determination to move cautiously in filling the chairman's post after the controversy that recently enveloped another candidate, Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston.
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NEWS
April 5, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's blasted the military's top-heavy bureaucracy, enraged the Air Force by appearing to put down air power and, at times, collided with his service's boss, the Marine commandant. For this crockery-breaking candor, the Clinton administration soon may give Gen. John J. Sheehan a job usually reserved for calm, conciliatory personalities: chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Sheehan, the imposing 6-foot-2 Marine who now runs the powerful Norfolk, Va.
NEWS
April 5, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's blasted the military's top-heavy bureaucracy, enraged the Air Force by appearing to put down air power and, at times, collided with his service's boss, the Marine commandant. For this crockery-breaking candor, the Clinton administration soon may give Gen. John J. Sheehan a job usually reserved for calm, conciliatory personalities: chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Sheehan, the imposing 6-foot-2 Marine who now runs the powerful Norfolk, Va.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rising temperatures and fading hopes could touch off rioting this summer among some 20,000 Cuban rafters--most of them single men--being held in barren detention camps at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the military chief of the U.S. Atlantic command warned Tuesday. "We could have riots by July," four-star Gen. John J. Sheehan, commander of U.S. forces in the Caribbean, said at a press conference here. "They need a sense of hope. My fear is that . . .
BUSINESS
March 3, 1996
* Takahide Kaneko has been appointed president of Ricoh Electronics Inc. in Tustin. He succeeds Katsumi Yoshida, who was named vice chairman of Ricoh Corp. in West Caldwell, N.J. Yoshida will also serve as chairman of Ricoh Electronics. Kaneko was previously manager of the purchasing division at Ricoh Co. Ltd. in Tokyo. * John J. Sheehan Jr. has joined Nationwide Health Properties Inc., a Newport Beach real estate investment trust, as vice president of development.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The images are haunting still: the twisted wrecks of helicopter gunships shot down in the Oct. 3, 1993, firefight that killed 18 U.S. Army Rangers in Somalia; the charred body of an American soldier paraded through the streets of Mogadishu by a chanting crowd. Vivid even now, they are driving the national debate--leading to today's scheduled vote in the Senate--over President Clinton's plan to send 20,000 U.S. ground troops on a potentially hazardous peacekeeping mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2007 | From the Washington Post
The White House wants to appoint a czar to oversee the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan with authority to issue directions to the Pentagon, State Department and other agencies but has had trouble finding anyone able and willing to take the job, according to people close to the situation. At least three retired four-star generals approached by the White House in recent weeks have declined to be considered for the job, the Post has learned. "The very fundamental issue is, they don't know where ...
NEWS
September 29, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress took the first step Wednesday toward limiting President Clinton's authority to deal with the crisis in Haiti, as the House Foreign Affairs Committee approved a resolution authorizing the presence of U.S. forces there only until March 1. The measure was backed on a 27-18 vote along party lines after a spirited debate in which both sides made it clear that they still have deep reservations about the Haiti mission.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top Air Force general broke ranks Wednesday with other high-level military leaders over the dangers of air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, asserting that U.S. planes could attack Serbian forces with "virtually no risk" to American pilots. The assessment by Gen. Merrill A.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations ordered nearly all of its personnel out of Haiti on Friday, after it became clear that army commander Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras was refusing to resign as promised and tensions grew in the chaotic capital. Concern that groups of gunmen organized by the military and police would resume the murderous violence that has marked life here in recent days triggered the evacuation, which involved about 260 U.N. officials and human rights observers.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will arrive today to mark the end of the major U.S. military presence here and will be greeted by a still-thankful nation, but one increasingly convinced that U.S. policy is to blame for Haiti's growing lawlessness and a brutal economic crisis. Clinton will officially turn over to the United Nations responsibility for following through on policies that began Sept. 19, when 20,000 U.S.
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