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John J Sirica

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August 15, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired federal Judge John J. Sirica, the skeptical, activist jurist whose probing questions and tough legal tactics helped uncover the Watergate scandal of the Richard M. Nixon Administration, died Friday of cardiac arrest in Washington. He was 88. Sirica died at Georgetown University Medical Center, hospital spokeswoman Sandra Hvidsten said. She had no further details of the judge's illness. He was admitted to the hospital Tuesday for unspecified tests.
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NEWS
August 15, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired federal Judge John J. Sirica, the skeptical, activist jurist whose probing questions and tough legal tactics helped uncover the Watergate scandal of the Richard M. Nixon Administration, died Friday of cardiac arrest in Washington. He was 88. Sirica died at Georgetown University Medical Center, hospital spokeswoman Sandra Hvidsten said. She had no further details of the judge's illness. He was admitted to the hospital Tuesday for unspecified tests.
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NEWS
August 8, 1985
A UC Berkeley biologist whose planned outdoor tests with an altered "frost-fighting" bacteria was blocked by court order has received an award from the National Academy of Sciences. Steven Lindow, 34, an associate professor of plant pathology, who for 10 years has been studying how bacteria cause frost damage in crops, received the $15,000 Award for Initiatives in Research.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | United Press International
John J. Sirica, the tough-minded federal judge who guided the Watergate scandal from a third-rate burglary to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, said today that he has earned a vacation and is retiring effective Oct. 1. "I'm just tired," Sirica, 82, said. "After pretty near 30 years, there comes a time in a man's life when he has to take it easier."
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Dr. Charles Anthony Hufnagel, a cardiac surgeon who more than 35 years ago devised the first plastic heart valve, died on Wednesday at Sibley Memorial Hospital here. He was 72 and suffered from heart, lung and kidney ailments. In 1952, Hufnagel implanted the first artificial valve. It was in the heart of a 30-year-old woman at Georgetown University Medical School. The device developed by Hufnagel involved the insertion of a plastic valve into a damaged artery. A plastic ball encased in a tube forced the valve to open and close, permitting blood to flow into and out of the heart as it would through a normal artery.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
John J. Sirica, the federal judge whose dogged pursuit of the truth in the Watergate scandal unraveled Richard M. Nixon's presidency, died Friday. He was 88. Sirica died at 4:30 p.m. at Georgetown University Medical Center of cardiac arrest, said hospital spokeswoman Sandra Hvidsten. She did not have further details of the judge's illness or how long he was in the hospital.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | From the Washington Post
Gerhard A. Gesell, 82, the outspoken and liberal U.S. District Court judge who presided over some of Washington's most pivotal challenges to 1st Amendment rights and government power, died of liver cancer Friday at his home in Washington.
NEWS
July 4, 1986 | MIKE COWLING
--Judge John J. Sirica, who presided over the Watergate scandal from the "third-rate burglary" to the resignation of Richard M. Nixon as President, said he has earned the right to take it easy and will retire Oct. 1. "I'm just tired," said Sirica, 82. "After pretty near 30 years, there comes a time in a man's life when he has to take it easier." He was appointed to the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia in 1957. "This isn't anything sudden," Sirica said. "I'm in very good health.
NEWS
February 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
David L. Bazelon, the retired jurist who established a reputation for liberalism that defined societal and legal issues on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, has died of pneumonia at age 83. Bazelon, who pioneered the application of psychiatry to criminal law in expanding the insanity defense, served more than 30 years on the appellate court before stepping down in 1985, citing memory problems.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | Associated Press
1972 June 17: Five men--including James W. McCord Jr., security director for the Committee for the Re-Election of the President--are arrested at the Watergate office building for breaking into Democratic National Committee headquarters. Soon, G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt Jr., two others with connections to the president, are linked to the break-in. Sept. 15: Hunt, Liddy and the Watergate burglars are indicted by a federal grand jury. 1973 Jan.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chief U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson, whose authority over federal grand jury disputes includes the question of White House executive privilege, is known for her austere demeanor, tough courtroom discipline and deliberative manner in deciding cases. A former teacher in the rough-and-tumble District of Columbia school system, Johnson often takes no more from lawyers than she once did from the junior high school students she taught for four years. "She's very evenhanded.
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