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John J Sweeney

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BUSINESS
August 25, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps the toughest task for the two opponents in the first-ever contested election for president of the AFL-CIO is finding areas where they disagree. The candidates--Thomas R. Donahue, interim AFL-CIO president, and John J. Sweeney, president of the Service Employees International Union--squared off in Los Angeles on Thursday in the first debate of their campaign. Sweeney, 61, portrayed himself as a risk taker who will push reforms through quickly.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 2009 | Patrick J. McDonnell
He came to power as an insurgent vowing to shake up the stodgy House of Labor that was the AFL-CIO. Fourteen years later, John J. Sweeney, an immigrants' son who rose to the pinnacle of U.S. unionism, is stepping down this month as president of the AFL-CIO. The labor movement remains deeply divided, its ranks greatly thinned, its top legislative goals unrealized and unemployment nearing 10%, the highest in more than a quarter of a century. Yet Sweeney, 75, departs as organized labor faces its best prospects in years.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 2009 | Patrick J. McDonnell
He came to power as an insurgent vowing to shake up the stodgy House of Labor that was the AFL-CIO. Fourteen years later, John J. Sweeney, an immigrants' son who rose to the pinnacle of U.S. unionism, is stepping down this month as president of the AFL-CIO. The labor movement remains deeply divided, its ranks greatly thinned, its top legislative goals unrealized and unemployment nearing 10%, the highest in more than a quarter of a century. Yet Sweeney, 75, departs as organized labor faces its best prospects in years.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney, the center of a storm in the labor movement, was reelected to a fourth term Wednesday, just days after the defection of two major unions that sought his ouster. One of those unions -- the Service Employees International Union -- was headed by Sweeney when he was first elected AFL-CIO president in 1995. It joined the Teamsters in leaving the AFL-CIO on Monday. Sweeney faced no opposition for the four-year term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1997
AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney came to Los Angeles Tuesday to tell the county Board of Supervisors that it needs to give county employees a long-awaited pay raise because union workers have gone without one during the county's fiscal crisis over the last few years. Sweeney, the nation's top labor leader, met personally with each supervisor, adding a powerful voice to the chorus of calls for raises for workers who have gone as long as five years without one.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney, the center of a storm in the labor movement, was reelected to a fourth term Wednesday, just days after the defection of two major unions that sought his ouster. One of those unions -- the Service Employees International Union -- was headed by Sweeney when he was first elected AFL-CIO president in 1995. It joined the Teamsters in leaving the AFL-CIO on Monday. Sweeney faced no opposition for the four-year term.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unions backing John J. Sweeney, the dissident labor leader fighting a historic battle for the presidency of the AFL-CIO, claimed Monday that their candidate had locked up his election victory. Sweeney, the 61-year-old president of the Service Employees International Union, is challenging incumbent AFL-CIO President Thomas R. Donahue in the first openly contested leadership battle in the 40-year history of the modern American labor federation.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside America's labor movement, AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney has emerged as a hero. His sweeping overhaul of the national labor federation--launched after he won his dissident election campaign in 1995--has energized union militants, impressed former opponents and captured enormous media attention. But the revolution led by Sweeney, who stands unopposed for reelection today at the AFL-CIO's convention in Pittsburgh, so far has made scant headway in changing American economic life.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an extraordinary action to draw international attention to a Los Angeles workplace dispute, the nation's top labor leader disclosed Wednesday that he will go to Japan to press the cause of workers seeking to unionize downtown Los Angeles' New Otani Hotel & Garden. The planned trip by John J. Sweeney, president of the AFL-CIO, is believed to be the first time that any head of the American labor movement has traveled abroad to lobby directly for a local union's campaign.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relaxed, his hands in his pockets, John J. Sweeney thanked a cluster of home care employees for toiling at low pay as attendants to the infirm and the elderly. In an instant, the ruddy-cheeked labor leader had established an easy rapport with his audience of Latino and African American workers. "My mother was a domestic worker," he explained. "I guess that's what started me on my path." For Sweeney, president of the Service Employees International Union, it was a customary scene.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John J. Sweeney is widely credited with reinvigorating U.S. labor after years of complacency and shrinking relevance. Sweeney, now 65, has preached the importance of organizing almost nonstop since taking over leadership of the powerful AFL-CIO four years ago. The amiable, soft-spoken leader, the son of Irish immigrants, attended his first union meetings at the knee of his father, a New York bus driver. His mother was a domestic worker.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside America's labor movement, AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney has emerged as a hero. His sweeping overhaul of the national labor federation--launched after he won his dissident election campaign in 1995--has energized union militants, impressed former opponents and captured enormous media attention. But the revolution led by Sweeney, who stands unopposed for reelection today at the AFL-CIO's convention in Pittsburgh, so far has made scant headway in changing American economic life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1997
AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney came to Los Angeles Tuesday to tell the county Board of Supervisors that it needs to give county employees a long-awaited pay raise because union workers have gone without one during the county's fiscal crisis over the last few years. Sweeney, the nation's top labor leader, met personally with each supervisor, adding a powerful voice to the chorus of calls for raises for workers who have gone as long as five years without one.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1997
AFL-CIO President John Sweeney travels to Asia this weekend for meetings with labor leaders in Hong Kong and Japan. One of the main goals is to pressure the Japanese firms that own and manage the downtown Los Angeles New Otani Hotel & Garden, which has resisted a union-organizing drive by Local 11 of the Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union. Sweeney will also participate in an annual bilateral meeting with leaders of Japan's labor federation.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an extraordinary action to draw international attention to a Los Angeles workplace dispute, the nation's top labor leader disclosed Wednesday that he will go to Japan to press the cause of workers seeking to unionize downtown Los Angeles' New Otani Hotel & Garden. The planned trip by John J. Sweeney, president of the AFL-CIO, is believed to be the first time that any head of the American labor movement has traveled abroad to lobby directly for a local union's campaign.
OPINION
October 29, 1995 | Harry Bernstein, Harry Bernstein covered labor issues for The Times for 32 years. He interviewed John J. Sweeney after the convention ended in New York
Unions in America are in trouble. Membership, as a percentage of the work force, is less than half of its peak in the 1950s, corporations are battling them harder than at any time in recent years and a virulently anti-union majority in Congress is striving to pass legislation that will make them even weaker. On Wednesday, soft-spoken John J. Sweeney, 61, won the first contested election for the presidency of the AFL-CIO, the only federation of labor unions in the United States.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Union leader John J. Sweeney captured the presidency of the AFL-CIO on Wednesday, winning a landmark insurgent campaign launched to turn around the wounded and long-slumbering American labor movement. The campaign, along with marking the first contested election for the helm of the labor federation since the AFL and CIO merged in 1955, also rewrote U.S. labor history by putting the first minority into a top executive office.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Union leader John J. Sweeney captured the presidency of the AFL-CIO on Wednesday, winning a landmark insurgent campaign launched to turn around the wounded and long-slumbering American labor movement. The campaign, along with marking the first contested election for the helm of the labor federation since the AFL and CIO merged in 1955, also rewrote U.S. labor history by putting the first minority into a top executive office.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Union leader John J. Sweeney captured the presidency of the AFL-CIO on Wednesday, winning a landmark insurgent campaign launched to turn around the wounded and long-slumbering American labor movement. The campaign, along with marking the first contested election for the helm of the labor federation since the AFL and CIO merged in 1955, also rewrote U.S. labor history by putting the first minority into a top executive office.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Union leader John J. Sweeney captured the presidency of the AFL-CIO on Wednesday, winning a landmark insurgent campaign launched to turn around the wounded and long-slumbering American labor movement. The campaign, along with marking the first contested election for the helm of the labor federation since the AFL and CIO merged in 1955, also rewrote U.S. labor history by putting the first minority into a top executive office.
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