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John J Wasmuth

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1996 | RENE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John J. Wasmuth, a UC Irvine biochemist who helped discover the genes that cause dwarfism and other diseases, has died at age 49, university officials announced Tuesday. His family requested that the cause of his death on Friday be withheld, said UCI spokeswoman Susan Menning. Wasmuth, who was raised in a small Illinois farming community, became one of the world's most prominent genetic researchers. For more than a decade, he worked to discover genetic defects and the tests to diagnose them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1996 | RENE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John J. Wasmuth, a UC Irvine biochemist who helped discover the genes that cause dwarfism and other diseases, has died at age 49, university officials announced Tuesday. His family requested that the cause of his death on Friday be withheld, said UCI spokeswoman Susan Menning. Wasmuth, who was raised in a small Illinois farming community, became one of the world's most prominent genetic researchers. For more than a decade, he worked to discover genetic defects and the tests to diagnose them.
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NEWS
December 30, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
UC Irvine researchers report that they have identified a genetic abnormality they believe causes spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of death in infants. "This is a long-anticipated finding that should quickly improve accuracy in diagnosis of the forms of SMA," said Donald S. Wood, director of science technology for the Muscular Dystrophy Assn. "Most important, it will accelerate our continuing search for a form of treatment for SMA." No treatment now exists.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
UC Irvine researchers report that they have identified a genetic abnormality they believe causes spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of death in infants. "This is a long-anticipated finding that should quickly improve accuracy in diagnosis of the forms of SMA," said Donald S. Wood, director of science technology for the Muscular Dystrophy Assn. "Most important, it will accelerate our continuing search for a form of treatment for SMA." No treatment for the disease now exists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1987 | THOMAS. H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Researchers have identified a new genetic marker for Huntington's disease that brings them one step closer to identification of the defective gene that causes the disease, a team of investigators has reported. Discovery of the new marker sharply narrows the area of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) where researchers must search for the gene, reported the team, which is headed by geneticist James F. Gusella of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
UC Irvine researchers report that they have identified a genetic abnormality they believe causes spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of death in infants. "This is a long-anticipated finding that should quickly improve accuracy in diagnosis of the forms of SMA," said Donald S. Wood, director of science technology for the Muscular Dystrophy Assn. "Most important, it will accelerate our continuing search for a form of treatment for SMA." No treatment now exists.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To UC Irvine Prof. John J. Wasmuth, it is not speculation. It is a certainty. Three years from now a woman who suspects she is pregnant will go to her physician for tests. The physician will scrape a few cells from the 10-week-old fetus and send them off for genetic analysis. It will be routine; the results will come back in only a few days. The baby will be male. He will not have any of the more common, catastrophic birth defects. So far, so good. He will be prone to colon cancer in midlife.
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