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John James

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Dynasty' Under Way: "Dynasty: The Miniseries," a two-part four-hour saga, began filming Wednesday in Los Angeles and Northern California with much of the original cast signed on: John Forsythe as rich, powerful Blake Carrington, Linda Evans as his loving wife, Krystle, and Joan Collins as his just plain nasty former wife, Alexis. ABC is booking the show for Oct. 20 and 22, against CBS' coverage of the World Series.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
As a little girl in Ohio in the mid-1800s, Genevieve "Gennie" Jones would accompany her country doctor father in his buggy as he visited patients. Along the way they'd discuss the natural world, which turned into a lifelong passion. Then in 1876, consumed with heartache from a broken engagement, Jones traveled to the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. Here she viewed John James Audubon's masterpiece, "Birds of America. " Inspired by the beautiful watercolor drawings, she returned home with a new sense of purpose, determined to create a companion book illustrating birds' nests and eggs.
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NEWS
December 18, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John James could barely hear the caller on the other end of the line. "I don't want my son and daughter-in-law to hear me," the woman whispered. She explained that her husband died last Dec. 22. They had been married 55 years. And although her son and daughter-in-law had just arrived to spend the holidays with her in Whittier, she was not happy. In fact, she wanted to cry because she missed her husband, especially now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2011 | By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
When outgoing New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson turned down a petition to pardon Billy the Kid (1859?-1881) last month, he obviously didn't have to deliver the bad news to the Kid's face. But when the subject of forgiving another 19th century outlaw arose in Los Angeles in 1933, the suspect claimed to be present. "I'm the original Jesse James," a white-haired gent confessed to officers at the old Central Police Station. The notion that he had been killed in 1882 by fellow gang member Bob Ford (known thereafter in Missouri as the Dirty Little Coward)
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Arthur Welmas and Linda Streeter Dukic decided to challenge the leadership of the tiny Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, they knew they were taking a calculated risk. But they never quite realized the extent of their gamble until the conclusion of a 3 1/2-hour misconduct hearing in the main gaming hall of the Cabazon Bingo Palace last week. Welmas and Dukic, whose recent drive to oust Tribal Chairman John James for alleged mismanagement failed by one vote, were fined $50,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
David Nelson, the elder son of Ozzie and Harriet Nelson and the last surviving member of the family that became an American institution in the 1950s and '60s as the stars of the classic TV sitcom "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet," died Tuesday. He was 74. Nelson died at his Century City home of complications from colon cancer, said publicist Dale Olson. "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" began on radio in 1944, focusing on the home life of bandleader Ozzie Nelson and his vocalist wife, Harriet Hilliard.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010
' Naturalist John James Audubon's "Birds of America" sold at auction in London on Tuesday for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. FOR THE RECORD: "Birds of America": A Quick Takes item in the Dec. 8 Calendar section said that a rare edition of John James Audubon's "Birds of America" had been sold at auction for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. That figure excluded the buyer's premium, which was added later and brought the price to $11,567,575.
NEWS
September 18, 1985 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Three centuries ago, the parents of a mousy 12-year-old gave up 300 acres of London real estate as a dowry in order to marry her to an eligible young aristocrat. This was no surprise as wealthy families owned most of 17th-Century London. Some may find it surprising, though, that 300 years and a social revolution later, many of these same families still have vast holdings in London. They are among the world's wealthiest private urban landowners.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
As a little girl in Ohio in the mid-1800s, Genevieve "Gennie" Jones would accompany her country doctor father in his buggy as he visited patients. Along the way they'd discuss the natural world, which turned into a lifelong passion. Then in 1876, consumed with heartache from a broken engagement, Jones traveled to the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. Here she viewed John James Audubon's masterpiece, "Birds of America. " Inspired by the beautiful watercolor drawings, she returned home with a new sense of purpose, determined to create a companion book illustrating birds' nests and eggs.
BOOKS
April 22, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In this unpretentious, first-person account, John Horner describes his discoveries of some of the first fossilized dinosaur eggs, embryos and nests in North America, and offers his theories about dinosaur parental behavior. The arrangement of the nests, the size of the juvenile skeletons and the partially worn surfaces of the hatchlings' teeth suggest that adult maiasaurs ("good-mother lizards") protected and nurtured their young much the way some modern birds do.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010
' Naturalist John James Audubon's "Birds of America" sold at auction in London on Tuesday for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. FOR THE RECORD: "Birds of America": A Quick Takes item in the Dec. 8 Calendar section said that a rare edition of John James Audubon's "Birds of America" had been sold at auction for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. That figure excluded the buyer's premium, which was added later and brought the price to $11,567,575.
OPINION
May 28, 2010 | Danny Heitman
The oil spill disaster off the coast of my home state of Louisiana is stark evidence that humans have an awesome power to change the natural landscape, often for the worse. But landscapes also have the power to change us, as John James Audubon was reminded when he arrived in Louisiana in 1821. In Louisiana, Audubon encountered a biblical abundance of wildlife that transformed him and his bird art, enlarging his sense of possibility and refining his genius as an observer of the natural world.
BOOKS
October 10, 2004 | Avedis Hadjian, Avedis Hadjian is a former writer and editor for CNN online and an avid bird-watcher.
Great talents have deep roots. Richard Rhodes illustrates this with his "John James Audubon: The Making of an American," an unpretentiously titled book that is more than a mere biography: It is a comprehensive history of a man and his era.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Under a Wild Sky John James Audubon and the Making of The Birds of America William Souder North Point Press/Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 368 pp., $25 * In "Under a Wild Sky," William Souder deftly weaves together the story of the self-taught artist and naturalist John James Audubon with the development of scientific inquiry in the early years of the republic and the lives of ordinary Americans as the new nation spilled westward over the mountains from the Eastern seaboard.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Arthur Welmas and Linda Streeter Dukic decided to challenge the leadership of the tiny Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, they knew they were taking a calculated risk. But they never quite realized the extent of their gamble until the conclusion of a 3 1/2-hour misconduct hearing in the main gaming hall of the Cabazon Bingo Palace last week. Welmas and Dukic, whose recent drive to oust Tribal Chairman John James for alleged mismanagement failed by one vote, were fined $50,000 each.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Dynasty' Under Way: "Dynasty: The Miniseries," a two-part four-hour saga, began filming Wednesday in Los Angeles and Northern California with much of the original cast signed on: John Forsythe as rich, powerful Blake Carrington, Linda Evans as his loving wife, Krystle, and Joan Collins as his just plain nasty former wife, Alexis. ABC is booking the show for Oct. 20 and 22, against CBS' coverage of the World Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Under a Wild Sky John James Audubon and the Making of The Birds of America William Souder North Point Press/Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 368 pp., $25 * In "Under a Wild Sky," William Souder deftly weaves together the story of the self-taught artist and naturalist John James Audubon with the development of scientific inquiry in the early years of the republic and the lives of ordinary Americans as the new nation spilled westward over the mountains from the Eastern seaboard.
OPINION
May 28, 2010 | Danny Heitman
The oil spill disaster off the coast of my home state of Louisiana is stark evidence that humans have an awesome power to change the natural landscape, often for the worse. But landscapes also have the power to change us, as John James Audubon was reminded when he arrived in Louisiana in 1821. In Louisiana, Audubon encountered a biblical abundance of wildlife that transformed him and his bird art, enlarging his sense of possibility and refining his genius as an observer of the natural world.
BOOKS
April 22, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In this unpretentious, first-person account, John Horner describes his discoveries of some of the first fossilized dinosaur eggs, embryos and nests in North America, and offers his theories about dinosaur parental behavior. The arrangement of the nests, the size of the juvenile skeletons and the partially worn surfaces of the hatchlings' teeth suggest that adult maiasaurs ("good-mother lizards") protected and nurtured their young much the way some modern birds do.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John James could barely hear the caller on the other end of the line. "I don't want my son and daughter-in-law to hear me," the woman whispered. She explained that her husband died last Dec. 22. They had been married 55 years. And although her son and daughter-in-law had just arrived to spend the holidays with her in Whittier, she was not happy. In fact, she wanted to cry because she missed her husband, especially now.
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