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John James Audubon

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OPINION
May 28, 2010 | Danny Heitman
The oil spill disaster off the coast of my home state of Louisiana is stark evidence that humans have an awesome power to change the natural landscape, often for the worse. But landscapes also have the power to change us, as John James Audubon was reminded when he arrived in Louisiana in 1821. In Louisiana, Audubon encountered a biblical abundance of wildlife that transformed him and his bird art, enlarging his sense of possibility and refining his genius as an observer of the natural world.
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OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By Andrew Harmon
Over the last several months, a young brown pelican's obsessive preening regimen has dominated the view from my office window at the Northern California wildlife hospital where I work. We don't name the patients we care for - if animals could talk, I imagine the first thing they'd express is their dislike of anthropomorphism. But I can't stop thinking of him as Red, because of the colored temporary band on his right leg. Red's the closest thing I've had to a cubicle mate. He came to us in September with a severe injury to his left patagium (a fold of skin on the leading edge of the wing)
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NATIONAL
December 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A rare complete edition of John James Audubon's "The Birds of America" was auctioned in New York for $5.6 million, ending three years of legal wrangling over a decision by a financially strapped Providence, R.I., library to dispose of its most valuable holding. The 1838 edition of ornithologist Audubon's most famous work went to a person bidding by telephone, said Benedetta Roux, spokeswoman for Christie's auction house. She did not identify the bidder.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
As a little girl in Ohio in the mid-1800s, Genevieve "Gennie" Jones would accompany her country doctor father in his buggy as he visited patients. Along the way they'd discuss the natural world, which turned into a lifelong passion. Then in 1876, consumed with heartache from a broken engagement, Jones traveled to the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. Here she viewed John James Audubon's masterpiece, "Birds of America. " Inspired by the beautiful watercolor drawings, she returned home with a new sense of purpose, determined to create a companion book illustrating birds' nests and eggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
T he great 19th century artist John James Audubon is best known for his detailed portraits of birds featured in his seminal book, "The Birds of America." But the artist-naturalist, who lived from 1785 until 1851, also published a series of illustrations of four-legged mammals of North America, "The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America." The story of this publication is the subject of "John James Audubon in the West: The Last Expedition, Mammals of North America," Sunday through Sept.
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By Andrew Harmon
Over the last several months, a young brown pelican's obsessive preening regimen has dominated the view from my office window at the Northern California wildlife hospital where I work. We don't name the patients we care for - if animals could talk, I imagine the first thing they'd express is their dislike of anthropomorphism. But I can't stop thinking of him as Red, because of the colored temporary band on his right leg. Red's the closest thing I've had to a cubicle mate. He came to us in September with a severe injury to his left patagium (a fold of skin on the leading edge of the wing)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | Lisa Cornwell, Associated Press
As a child growing up in Cincinnati in the 1930s, John Ruthven would sit on the banks of the Ohio River sketching wildlife and imagining journeys with famed naturalist John James Audubon. Today, the 80-year-old artist is a National Medal of Arts recipient. "It was the crowning moment for what I have tried to accomplish with my work," Ruthven says of the honor he received in November from President Bush. Ruthven, often called by peers and fans a "20th century Audubon," began his career illustrating containers of Play-Doh.
OPINION
December 11, 2010 | Tim Rutten
We are told with numbing regularity these days that "print is dead" and that the Digital Age soon will sweep the bound, mass-produced book into history's bin of extinct curiosities alongside species once similarly numerous, like the woolly mammoth and the passenger pigeon. We will receive our wisdom, information and literary entertainment not from printed pages but in recovered pulses of code. This is to be the e-book epoch, the era of the Kindle. What does it signify, then, that in London this week, an auction at Sotheby's achieved a record price for a printed book ?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010
' Naturalist John James Audubon's "Birds of America" sold at auction in London on Tuesday for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. FOR THE RECORD: "Birds of America": A Quick Takes item in the Dec. 8 Calendar section said that a rare edition of John James Audubon's "Birds of America" had been sold at auction for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. That figure excluded the buyer's premium, which was added later and brought the price to $11,567,575.
OPINION
December 11, 2010 | Tim Rutten
We are told with numbing regularity these days that "print is dead" and that the Digital Age soon will sweep the bound, mass-produced book into history's bin of extinct curiosities alongside species once similarly numerous, like the woolly mammoth and the passenger pigeon. We will receive our wisdom, information and literary entertainment not from printed pages but in recovered pulses of code. This is to be the e-book epoch, the era of the Kindle. What does it signify, then, that in London this week, an auction at Sotheby's achieved a record price for a printed book ?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010
' Naturalist John James Audubon's "Birds of America" sold at auction in London on Tuesday for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. FOR THE RECORD: "Birds of America": A Quick Takes item in the Dec. 8 Calendar section said that a rare edition of John James Audubon's "Birds of America" had been sold at auction for $10 million, making it the world's most expensive book. That figure excluded the buyer's premium, which was added later and brought the price to $11,567,575.
OPINION
May 28, 2010 | Danny Heitman
The oil spill disaster off the coast of my home state of Louisiana is stark evidence that humans have an awesome power to change the natural landscape, often for the worse. But landscapes also have the power to change us, as John James Audubon was reminded when he arrived in Louisiana in 1821. In Louisiana, Audubon encountered a biblical abundance of wildlife that transformed him and his bird art, enlarging his sense of possibility and refining his genius as an observer of the natural world.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A rare complete edition of John James Audubon's "The Birds of America" was auctioned in New York for $5.6 million, ending three years of legal wrangling over a decision by a financially strapped Providence, R.I., library to dispose of its most valuable holding. The 1838 edition of ornithologist Audubon's most famous work went to a person bidding by telephone, said Benedetta Roux, spokeswoman for Christie's auction house. She did not identify the bidder.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | Lisa Cornwell, Associated Press
As a child growing up in Cincinnati in the 1930s, John Ruthven would sit on the banks of the Ohio River sketching wildlife and imagining journeys with famed naturalist John James Audubon. Today, the 80-year-old artist is a National Medal of Arts recipient. "It was the crowning moment for what I have tried to accomplish with my work," Ruthven says of the honor he received in November from President Bush. Ruthven, often called by peers and fans a "20th century Audubon," began his career illustrating containers of Play-Doh.
BOOKS
October 10, 2004 | Avedis Hadjian, Avedis Hadjian is a former writer and editor for CNN online and an avid bird-watcher.
Great talents have deep roots. Richard Rhodes illustrates this with his "John James Audubon: The Making of an American," an unpretentiously titled book that is more than a mere biography: It is a comprehensive history of a man and his era.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
As a little girl in Ohio in the mid-1800s, Genevieve "Gennie" Jones would accompany her country doctor father in his buggy as he visited patients. Along the way they'd discuss the natural world, which turned into a lifelong passion. Then in 1876, consumed with heartache from a broken engagement, Jones traveled to the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. Here she viewed John James Audubon's masterpiece, "Birds of America. " Inspired by the beautiful watercolor drawings, she returned home with a new sense of purpose, determined to create a companion book illustrating birds' nests and eggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Under a Wild Sky John James Audubon and the Making of The Birds of America William Souder North Point Press/Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 368 pp., $25 * In "Under a Wild Sky," William Souder deftly weaves together the story of the self-taught artist and naturalist John James Audubon with the development of scientific inquiry in the early years of the republic and the lives of ordinary Americans as the new nation spilled westward over the mountains from the Eastern seaboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Under a Wild Sky John James Audubon and the Making of The Birds of America William Souder North Point Press/Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 368 pp., $25 * In "Under a Wild Sky," William Souder deftly weaves together the story of the self-taught artist and naturalist John James Audubon with the development of scientific inquiry in the early years of the republic and the lives of ordinary Americans as the new nation spilled westward over the mountains from the Eastern seaboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
T he great 19th century artist John James Audubon is best known for his detailed portraits of birds featured in his seminal book, "The Birds of America." But the artist-naturalist, who lived from 1785 until 1851, also published a series of illustrations of four-legged mammals of North America, "The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America." The story of this publication is the subject of "John James Audubon in the West: The Last Expedition, Mammals of North America," Sunday through Sept.
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