Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn K Singlaub
IN THE NEWS

John K Singlaub

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 1987
John K. Singlaub, a retired U.S. Army major general, denied published reports that he recruited Vietnam War veterans to fight Communist rebels in the Philippines and dismissed reports linking him to a recent coup attempt against President Corazon Aquino. "Any discussion that I'm in any way involved in any political activity is a total lie," Singlaub told a Manila radio station in an interview from his home in Colorado. Singlaub acknowledged that he has worked for years in support of the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
October 6, 1991 | Ed Cray, An associate professor of journalism at USC, Cray is the author of "General of the Army," a biography of George G. Marshall (Touchstone)
Once he might have been the very model of the professional soldier, combat-tempered, well-schooled, a veteran of regular and irregular operations. He was brave. He assumed responsibility. And in an Army known for adaptability and improvisation, he was one of the more creative. Unfortunately for this modern major general, John Singlaub failed to learn the singular lesson of the American military: Soldiers have no public politics.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
White House aide Lt. Col. Oliver L. North sought out a British mercenary to destroy Soviet-made HIND-D assault helicopters in Nicaragua, retired Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub said Thursday in testimony before the House and Senate congressional committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, while once agreeing it might violate federal law for him to direct a resupply mission for the Nicaraguan Contras, coordinated arms shipments to them for two years while a congressional ban against U.S. military aid to the rebel forces was in effect, a retired Army general testified Wednesday. Retired Maj. Gen. John K.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The House and Senate committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal are scheduled to hear continued testimony today from retired Army Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub and from three private contributors to the Nicaraguan rebel cause: Ellen Garwood, William O'Boyle and Joseph Coors. Singlaub, a former chief of staff of U.S. forces in South Korea, was the contras' most visible private fund-raiser in the United States from 1984 until 1986, when Congress banned U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, while once agreeing it might violate federal law for him to direct a resupply mission for the Nicaraguan Contras, coordinated arms shipments to them for two years while a congressional ban against U.S. military aid to the rebel forces was in effect, a retired Army general testified Wednesday. Retired Maj. Gen. John K.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | Associated Press
A federal judge threw out a $24-million damage suit Thursday against former CIA officials, Contra leaders and cocaine traffickers accused of running an arms-for-drugs smuggling scheme. Chief U.S. District Judge James Lawrence King dismissed the case against Iran-Contra figures Richard V. Secord and Albert A. Hakim; Theodore G. Shackley, former CIA deputy director of operations; former Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub, and 25 other defendants, including leaders of Colombia's violent Medellin cartel.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, acting as unofficial quartermaster for the Nicaraguan resistance, doled out tens of thousands of dollars to contra leaders from his White House safe at a time when the Reagan Administration was prohibited by Congress from assisting the rebels, the man who acted as North's courier told Senate and House investigating committees Thursday. The testimony of Robert W.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Working out of a second-floor office in an ultramodern building in Makati, a suburb of Manila, a mysterious American group has spent the past several months acquiring walkie-talkies, metal detectors, computers and some of the most advanced office equipment in the Philippines. A brass sign outside the office provides few clues to what goes on within. "Restricted Area," it cautions. But in the past few weeks, this shadowy group has become the focus of controversy.
BOOKS
October 6, 1991 | Ed Cray, An associate professor of journalism at USC, Cray is the author of "General of the Army," a biography of George G. Marshall (Touchstone)
Once he might have been the very model of the professional soldier, combat-tempered, well-schooled, a veteran of regular and irregular operations. He was brave. He assumed responsibility. And in an Army known for adaptability and improvisation, he was one of the more creative. Unfortunately for this modern major general, John Singlaub failed to learn the singular lesson of the American military: Soldiers have no public politics.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | Associated Press
A federal judge threw out a $24-million damage suit Thursday against former CIA officials, Contra leaders and cocaine traffickers accused of running an arms-for-drugs smuggling scheme. Chief U.S. District Judge James Lawrence King dismissed the case against Iran-Contra figures Richard V. Secord and Albert A. Hakim; Theodore G. Shackley, former CIA deputy director of operations; former Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub, and 25 other defendants, including leaders of Colombia's violent Medellin cartel.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
White House aide Lt. Col. Oliver L. North sought out a British mercenary to destroy Soviet-made HIND-D assault helicopters in Nicaragua, retired Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub said Thursday in testimony before the House and Senate congressional committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The House and Senate committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal are scheduled to hear continued testimony today from retired Army Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub and from three private contributors to the Nicaraguan rebel cause: Ellen Garwood, William O'Boyle and Joseph Coors. Singlaub, a former chief of staff of U.S. forces in South Korea, was the contras' most visible private fund-raiser in the United States from 1984 until 1986, when Congress banned U.S.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, acting as unofficial quartermaster for the Nicaraguan resistance, doled out tens of thousands of dollars to contra leaders from his White House safe at a time when the Reagan Administration was prohibited by Congress from assisting the rebels, the man who acted as North's courier told Senate and House investigating committees Thursday. The testimony of Robert W.
NEWS
February 20, 1987
John K. Singlaub, a retired U.S. Army major general, denied published reports that he recruited Vietnam War veterans to fight Communist rebels in the Philippines and dismissed reports linking him to a recent coup attempt against President Corazon Aquino. "Any discussion that I'm in any way involved in any political activity is a total lie," Singlaub told a Manila radio station in an interview from his home in Colorado. Singlaub acknowledged that he has worked for years in support of the U.S.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Working out of a second-floor office in an ultramodern building in Makati, a suburb of Manila, a mysterious American group has spent the past several months acquiring walkie-talkies, metal detectors, computers and some of the most advanced office equipment in the Philippines. A brass sign outside the office provides few clues to what goes on within. "Restricted Area," it cautions. But in the past few weeks, this shadowy group has become the focus of controversy.
NEWS
December 20, 1987
The Internal Revenue Service has revoked the tax-exempt status of a foundation headed by retired Army Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub, saying it failed to prove it was not helping the Contras militarily in Nicaragua. The U.S. Council for World Freedom, which raises money to help foreign anti-communist movements, will file a federal court suit this week to fight the IRS decision, spokesmen said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|