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John Karevoll

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NEWS
October 7, 2003
Nothing does more to keep Southern Californians away from national forests than the Orwellian-named Adventure Pass ("Some Hiking Fees Questioned," Sept. 23). John Karevoll Running Springs
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BUSINESS
January 30, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
California's luxury housing market is booming. In activity reminiscent of real estate's bubble years, the number of homes statewide selling at more than $5 million reached an all-time high last year, while those selling at $1 million or more rose to the highest level since 2007, a real estate information service has reported. Sales are up because well-heeled U.S. and international buyers, confident that the housing recovery is solid, are looking for places to park their cash, real estate experts said.
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TRAVEL
July 6, 2003
I'm happy that Rosemary McClure and the kids enjoyed their drive around our San Bernardino Mountains ("In the Footsteps of Miners With Minors in San Bernardino," June 29). But I'm saddened that it is a violation of federal law to pull to the side of the road and get out of your car to enjoy the view without first purchasing an Adventure Pass. This law is up for renewal in the current appropriations bill, and some Washington lawmakers want to make it permanent. Right now is a good time to put pen to paper or pick up the phone and let them know what you think.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2008 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
Southern California home sales rose last month for the first time in nearly three years, as steep discounts lured buyers back into a market where values have tumbled 31% over the last year. Sales volume was up 13.8% overall from a year earlier, with Riverside County leading the way with a 48.6% jump, MDA DataQuick reported Monday. Los Angeles County was the exception, posting a 3.2% decline. The rise is being driven in part by buyers like Andre and Jody Ocampo, who attended an auction of 250 foreclosed homes at the Riverside Convention Center on Sunday, looking for a bargain.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2008 | Peter Y. Hong
Whether expensive homes in prestigious areas will escape the housing crash remains a hotly debated topic. I hear from many readers (and see some examples where I live) of houses still selling, sometimes quickly, and sometimes for prices higher than the owners paid just a couple of years ago. Yet economists I interview contend prices at the high end are just sticky -- they take longer to fall, but do so eventually. Holdout sellers at some point cave in, raising supply, and trade-up buyers from other areas don't have as much money to buy in the pricier neighborhoods, squeezing demand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2000 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County housing prices soared in April, but the number of homes sold slumped sharply, suggesting to analysts that the market may finally be slowing down just as it heads into what is typically the busiest part of the year. Sales across the county tumbled 14% from the same month last year, while the median price rose about 8% to $256,000.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
California's luxury housing market is booming. In activity reminiscent of real estate's bubble years, the number of homes statewide selling at more than $5 million reached an all-time high last year, while those selling at $1 million or more rose to the highest level since 2007, a real estate information service has reported. Sales are up because well-heeled U.S. and international buyers, confident that the housing recovery is solid, are looking for places to park their cash, real estate experts said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2008 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
Southern California home sales rose last month for the first time in nearly three years, as steep discounts lured buyers back into a market where values have tumbled 31% over the last year. Sales volume was up 13.8% overall from a year earlier, with Riverside County leading the way with a 48.6% jump, MDA DataQuick reported Monday. Los Angeles County was the exception, posting a 3.2% decline. The rise is being driven in part by buyers like Andre and Jody Ocampo, who attended an auction of 250 foreclosed homes at the Riverside Convention Center on Sunday, looking for a bargain.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2007 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
John Karevoll keeps a cartoon on his bulletin board that shows a man exclaiming: "It's all one big crapshoot." The caption: "Occasionally Ted is struck by a blinding moment of clarity." The residential real estate market has always been a matter of extreme interest to Californians, but rarely more than now. After years of boom and bubble, the market is deflating fast. A growing number of pessimists are sure the fallout will be lengthy and nasty.
NEWS
January 31, 1998
In another sign of an improving local economy, defaults on home mortgages--homeowners falling 90 days behind in payment--were down about 21% in the San Fernando Valley in 1997 compared with 1996, according to John Karevoll of Acxiom/DataQuick Information Services. As a result, foreclosures will "decline significantly" in 1998, he added.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2008 | Peter Y. Hong
Whether expensive homes in prestigious areas will escape the housing crash remains a hotly debated topic. I hear from many readers (and see some examples where I live) of houses still selling, sometimes quickly, and sometimes for prices higher than the owners paid just a couple of years ago. Yet economists I interview contend prices at the high end are just sticky -- they take longer to fall, but do so eventually. Holdout sellers at some point cave in, raising supply, and trade-up buyers from other areas don't have as much money to buy in the pricier neighborhoods, squeezing demand.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2007 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
John Karevoll keeps a cartoon on his bulletin board that shows a man exclaiming: "It's all one big crapshoot." The caption: "Occasionally Ted is struck by a blinding moment of clarity." The residential real estate market has always been a matter of extreme interest to Californians, but rarely more than now. After years of boom and bubble, the market is deflating fast. A growing number of pessimists are sure the fallout will be lengthy and nasty.
NEWS
October 7, 2003
Nothing does more to keep Southern Californians away from national forests than the Orwellian-named Adventure Pass ("Some Hiking Fees Questioned," Sept. 23). John Karevoll Running Springs
TRAVEL
July 6, 2003
I'm happy that Rosemary McClure and the kids enjoyed their drive around our San Bernardino Mountains ("In the Footsteps of Miners With Minors in San Bernardino," June 29). But I'm saddened that it is a violation of federal law to pull to the side of the road and get out of your car to enjoy the view without first purchasing an Adventure Pass. This law is up for renewal in the current appropriations bill, and some Washington lawmakers want to make it permanent. Right now is a good time to put pen to paper or pick up the phone and let them know what you think.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2000 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County housing prices soared in April, but the number of homes sold slumped sharply, suggesting to analysts that the market may finally be slowing down just as it heads into what is typically the busiest part of the year. Sales across the county tumbled 14% from the same month last year, while the median price rose about 8% to $256,000.
OPINION
January 13, 2002
Jeffrey Miles (letter, Jan. 5) repeats the oft-stated "we have the best, most effective health care system in the world." Not true, and it's not even close anymore. A check of the international studies of the last decade reveals that, by any measure, the single-payer systems in Europe and Canada provide more comprehensive coverage for more people at lower cost. John Karevoll Running Springs
BUSINESS
September 27, 1994 | Jack Searles
Sales of new and existing homes in Ventura County totaled 1,074 in August, up 18% from 909 in July and up 24% from 864 in August, 1993, reports Dataquick Information Systems. "Higher-priced homes are starting to move," Dataquick analyst John Karevoll reported. He adds that buyers are dodging rising interest rates by opting for adjustable-rate mortgages. . . .
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