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John Kasich

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NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A year ago, he was one of the more hated governors in America. Republican Gov. John Kasich had pushed through Senate Bill 5, legislation that limited collective bargaining rights for public employees in the state. He invoked the ire of longtime Republicans, including members of police and fire unions, and was roundly mocked after an initiative, Issue 2, repealed the law by a 2-1 margin. "I've got lots and lots of guys who said because of continued attacks on the unions, they no longer consider themselves to be Republican," Jay McDonald, the head of Ohio's Fraternal Order of Police, told The Times . But for better or worse, Kasich seems to have rebounded, and is playing a role in the election this year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
It is the center of the political universe in presidential contests. And now the war over the nation's new healthcare program has come to Ohio as well, with potential repercussions for the short- and long-term future of the state's governor, John Kasich. Kasich has been feuding with some of his fellow Republicans over whether to expand the Medicaid insurance program for state residents, under terms of the healthcare plan. GOP lawmakers stripped the expansion from the state's budget, prompting an end-run by Kasich to the state's obscure Controlling Board, which on Monday approved the expansion . (The board normally doesn't deal with matters as fraught as the multimillion-dollar federal benefit under Obamacare.)
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NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
It's the independent voters in Ohio who will help decide the general election in one of the nation's most important swing states. But comments by voters hitting the polls in Columbus on Super Tuesday indicate that Republicans may already have a handicap in November: the state's GOP governor, John Kasich. Kasich is beloved by many conservatives for keeping his promise to cut the state's deficit, but he also signed into law a bill, SB 5, that took away collective bargaining rights from public employees.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A year ago, he was one of the more hated governors in America. Republican Gov. John Kasich had pushed through Senate Bill 5, legislation that limited collective bargaining rights for public employees in the state. He invoked the ire of longtime Republicans, including members of police and fire unions, and was roundly mocked after an initiative, Issue 2, repealed the law by a 2-1 margin. "I've got lots and lots of guys who said because of continued attacks on the unions, they no longer consider themselves to be Republican," Jay McDonald, the head of Ohio's Fraternal Order of Police, told The Times . But for better or worse, Kasich seems to have rebounded, and is playing a role in the election this year.
OPINION
December 15, 1996 | Janet Hook
If balancing the federal budget required nothing but exuberance, Rep. John R. Kasich (R-Ohio) would have had Washington running in the black a long time ago. Kasich, the 44-year-old chairman of the House Budget Committee, is renowned on Capitol Hill for leavening dry-as-dust budget debates with a boyish enthusiasm that invites comparison to a hyperactive child.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
  Residents here were all for balancing Ohio's budget. They didn't expect that to mean their town would cease to exist. This small village of low-slung houses and squeaky swing sets in western Ohio's farm country has already laid off its part-time police officer and decided not to replace its maintenance worker, who recently retired. To save cash, Mayor William Rolston will propose Monday that the town turn off the street lights, and that Uniopolis disincorporate after more than a century in existence.
NEWS
April 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
House Budget Committee Chairman John R. Kasich, in a television interview, indicated that he would announce a bid for the presidency next year, but a spokesman said later that no decision had been made. The Ohio Republican was asked on NBC's "Meet the Press" when he would declare his intentions for the 2000 presidential race. "When is John Kasich going to announce when he is running for president?" NBC moderator Tim Russert asked. "Not until 1999," Kasich said.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
National Democrats including President Obama are lending support to an effort by Democrats and labor allies in Ohio to repeal legislation that curbed collective bargaining rights for state employees. Earlier this year, newly-elected Republican Gov. John Kasich signed Senate Bill 5, arguing that limiting state employee unions' ability to collectively bargain was part of the answer to state budget woes. A similar effort in Wisconsin led to recall attempts against a slate of Republican state senators, only several of which succeeded.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Conventions can be a long slog of speakers - five straight hours on Tuesday night, for example. But delegates perked up when a lifelong Republican firefighter named Doug Stern stood in front of a crowded arena and said he planned to vote for President Obama. “For the vast majority of my life, I've been a Republican,” Stern said. “But somewhere along the way, being a public employee - someone who works for my community - made me a scapegoat for the GOP.” Stern said he decided to vote for Obama after he saw the debilitating results of efforts to end collective bargaining for public employees in Ohio and other states.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Conventions can be a long slog of speakers - five straight hours on Tuesday night, for example. But delegates perked up when a lifelong Republican firefighter named Doug Stern stood in front of a crowded arena and said he planned to vote for President Obama. “For the vast majority of my life, I've been a Republican,” Stern said. “But somewhere along the way, being a public employee - someone who works for my community - made me a scapegoat for the GOP.” Stern said he decided to vote for Obama after he saw the debilitating results of efforts to end collective bargaining for public employees in Ohio and other states.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
"Welcome to Ohio," Mitt Romney told President Obama with more than a dash of sarcasm in an open letter on the eve of Obama's rally Saturday in Columbus. "I have a simple question for you: Where are the jobs?" Romney got an answer to that question last week from Ohio Gov. John Kasich. Campaigning for Romney outside the capital, the Republican governor could hardly have strayed further off message as he painted a bright picture of economic recovery in Ohio just as Romney was trying to do the opposite.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
It's the independent voters in Ohio who will help decide the general election in one of the nation's most important swing states. But comments by voters hitting the polls in Columbus on Super Tuesday indicate that Republicans may already have a handicap in November: the state's GOP governor, John Kasich. Kasich is beloved by many conservatives for keeping his promise to cut the state's deficit, but he also signed into law a bill, SB 5, that took away collective bargaining rights from public employees.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
  Residents here were all for balancing Ohio's budget. They didn't expect that to mean their town would cease to exist. This small village of low-slung houses and squeaky swing sets in western Ohio's farm country has already laid off its part-time police officer and decided not to replace its maintenance worker, who recently retired. To save cash, Mayor William Rolston will propose Monday that the town turn off the street lights, and that Uniopolis disincorporate after more than a century in existence.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
National Democrats including President Obama are lending support to an effort by Democrats and labor allies in Ohio to repeal legislation that curbed collective bargaining rights for state employees. Earlier this year, newly-elected Republican Gov. John Kasich signed Senate Bill 5, arguing that limiting state employee unions' ability to collectively bargain was part of the answer to state budget woes. A similar effort in Wisconsin led to recall attempts against a slate of Republican state senators, only several of which succeeded.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
After refusing to comment on a controversial effort by Ohio Gov. John Kasich to limit public employees' collective bargaining rights, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney on Wednesday delivered an enthusiastic endorsement of the measure. “I'm sorry if I created any confusion,” Romney said Wednesday at a campaign event outside a GOP office in Fairfax, Va. “I fully support Gov. Kasich's - I think it's called Question 2, in Ohio - fully support that.” He later added that he is “110% behind” the measure.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
The White House described this past weekend's golf summit as a "worthwhile encounter" between Washington's top Democrat and Republican, though differences clearly remain on a range of issues between the two leaders. Press Secretary Jay Carney said President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden were still talking about Saturday's outing on Monday morning, and that the president of course "enjoyed winning" on his team with House Speaker John Boehner. "It served the purpose that I spoke about, not to resolve the disagreements or the challenges that the leaders share, but to help create an environment where the talks as they go forward on deficit reduction, on dealing with the debt-ceiling vote, on all of the issues that leaders in Congress and the administration have to deal with -- it makes all of these conversations a little easier, a little more collegial.
NEWS
October 30, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Former President Bill Clinton campaigned in Ohio on Saturday, part of a last-minute push by Democrats to capture a state that has been traditionally important to the presidential aspirations of both parties. As he has throughout this midterm campaign season, Clinton slammed Republicans and compared their economic policies during the recession to his administration's positive efforts. "Their deal sounds good but it doesn't work," Clinton said. With just days to go before Tuesday's election, this weekend is whirlwind of stops, rallies and meet-and-greets as Democrats try to energize their base and Republicans continue their push to win the House and Senate.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
The White House described this past weekend's golf summit as a "worthwhile encounter" between Washington's top Democrat and Republican, though differences clearly remain on a range of issues between the two leaders. Press Secretary Jay Carney said President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden were still talking about Saturday's outing on Monday morning, and that the president of course "enjoyed winning" on his team with House Speaker John Boehner. "It served the purpose that I spoke about, not to resolve the disagreements or the challenges that the leaders share, but to help create an environment where the talks as they go forward on deficit reduction, on dealing with the debt-ceiling vote, on all of the issues that leaders in Congress and the administration have to deal with -- it makes all of these conversations a little easier, a little more collegial.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2011 | Christi Parsons
President Obama and House Speaker John A. Boehner played five hours of golf together Saturday, emerging with no deals on any of their current conflicts but showing signs that relations between them are cordial. In a bipartisan pairing, Obama and Boehner teamed up and beat Vice President Joe Biden and Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich in a game that went down to the wire on the 18th hole, according to White House officials, who provided no further details about the level of play.
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